Oct 23, 2018  
2006-2007 University Catalogue 
    
2006-2007 University Catalogue []

Financial Aid


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Chris Pesotski

cpesotski@uarts.edu
Director of Financial Aid
Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall
215-717-6170

The University of the Arts offers a variety of financial aid programs to assist students in meeting their educational goals. Aid may be offered in the form of grants, scholarships, loans, or employment and is funded through federal, state, institutional, or private organizations. Grants and scholarships are considered gift aid and need not be repaid. Loans, which must be repaid, are usually offered at a low interest rate and have an extended repayment period.

Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of education and the family’s federally expected calculated contribution to these costs, the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Where need exists, the University assists in meeting costs within the resources available to the institution.

Eligibility for aid is based upon the applicant’s financial need, the ability to meet individual program requirements, and the availability of funding.

Nearly 80 percent of the University’s students enrolled on a full-time basis are eligible for some type of need-based aid. All undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Information on application procedures, types of aid, program requirements, educational costs as determined by the University, and the students’ rights and responsibilities is detailed in this section. Most general questions will be answered below. Contact the Financial Aid Office for assistance with any specific questions you may have.

Eligibility Criteria

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In order to qualify for financial aid a student must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen, or eligible non-citizen per Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) regulations
  • Be admitted to the University
  • Not have received a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent - some forms of aid, however are offered to post-undergraduate students as specifically noted under “Bachelor’s Degree Holders.”
  • Not have received aid for the maximum number of allowable semesters (eight).
  • Not have defaulted on a previous federal loan.
  • Be matriculated in a program that terminates in a degree or certificate.
  • Be enrolled as a full-time student. (A full-time undergraduate student is one who is registered for at least 12 credits per semester.) The University offers some types of financial aid to part-time students. For undergraduates, part-time is defined as 6-11.5 credits. For graduate students, part-time is defined as 4.5-8.5 credits. Some forms of aid are offered to less than full-time students as specifically noted under “Part-Time Students.”
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University.
  • Apply for financial aid by the deadline.
  • Demonstrate financial need as determined by the analysis of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

 

Deadlines

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Deadlines are used to assist the University in determining how many students wish to be considered for aid from the available funds. We also use deadlines so that we will receive the necessary information and be able to forward a response to you, in time for you to make important decisions regarding your enrollment plans.

Students who miss the filing deadlines may receive less financial aid than students who apply on time. Late applicants may note be able to register for or attend classes if their late application results in outstanding balances.

All eligible students are considered for financial assistance regardless of filing date, depending upon availability of funds. However, University-administered funds will not be used to replace federal or state grants or loans for which a student may have been eligible but for which he/she failed to apply successfully.

Currently Enrolled Students

The University of the Arts’ postmark deadline for submission of the FAFSA is March 15.

All students who plan to attend the University during the Fall or Spring semesters must file the FAFSA by the above deadline. Incomplete applications and applications submitted after March 15 will be considered only after on-time applications have been awarded. Some types of aid (University Grants, Scholarships, SEOG Grants, Perkins Loans, Federal Work Study, and PHEAA Grants) are awarded on an on-time basis and may not be available to otherwise eligible but late applicants.

New Students

The University of the Arts’ postmark deadline for submission of the FAFSA is March 1.

All students who plan to attend the University during the Fall or Spring semesters must file the FAFSA by the above deadline. Incoming students are considered on a rolling, funds-available basis after the March 1 deadline. Applicants are advised to submit all application materials by March 1 or as soon as possible. Some sources of funding (as above) are limited and will not be available to otherwise eligible but late applicants.

PHEAA State Grant Deadlines - All Students

The state’s deadline for receipt of the completed FAFSA application is May 1, 2006, for the following year (2006-2007). Applications received after that date may render a student ineligible for PHEAA Grants as well as the other types of aid specified above.

Duration of Eligibility

Under federal and University guidelines, undergraduate students may continue to receive financial aid for only eight semesters, or until the first baccalaureate degree or its equivalent has been earned.

Students are no longer eligible for aid once they have either completed the requirements for the degree or have completed the equivalent number of credits.

Students may not receive undergraduate grants to complete minors, double degrees, or teacher certification programs that extend beyond eight semesters.

Students are not permitted to delay graduation in order to continue their eligibility for aid.

Students can also exhaust their eligibility for financial aid by failing or withdrawing from courses.

If you have questions about your status please contact the Financial Aid Office.

 

Financial Aid Application Procedure

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School Code

The University of the Arts Federal Title IV code is 003350.

To be considered for financial aid, students must be accepted for admission to the University or be currently enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University.

All students who wish to be considered for financial aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The information must be released to the U.S. Department of Education and to the University.

A student cannot be considered for any type of financial aid until a correct and complete FAFSA has been processed.

The University does not require the CSS, ACT, FAF, Profile, or other financial aid applications to be considered for financial assistance.

The Department of Education has provided an easy way to apply electronically for aid. With Internet access, the FAFSA can be completed and filed at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Transfer students may be required to submit financial aid transcripts to the University from post-secondary institutions attended in the current year, whether or not aid was received. This regulation applies to transfer students who enroll beginning in January. It does not apply to transfer students who enroll beginning in September.

Declining Financial Aid

If a student declines his/her offer of financial aid or admission, the University will rescind all offers of financial assistance (scholarships, grants, loans, and work study). If that student later decides to enroll at the University, he/she will be reconsidered for assistance at that point. Eligibility for financial assistance may be greatly reduced at a later point and will be determined on a funds-available basis.

A student may choose to decline a portion of his/her financial aid award by sending a letter to the Office of Financial Aid noting the type and amount of aid the student is declining.

State Grant Information

Residents of Pennsylvania (per PHEAA’s guidelines) will be evaluated for a PHEAA Grant by filing the FAFSA. PHEAA deadline May 1. FAFSA serves as the state grant application.

Residents of Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Ohio, Rhode Island, Vermont, or West Virginia, please note these additional deadlines:

Connecticut deadline February 1: state grant application required.

District of Columbia deadline June 28: district grant application required.

Rhode Island deadline March 1: FAFSA serves as state grant application.

West Virginia deadline June 28: state grant application required.

Students who are residents of these states and are currently receiving a state grant MUST file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). A separate state grant application form may also need to be submitted to the higher education assistance agency in the student’s home state.

If the state grant can be used in Pennsylvania, it is “portable.” Portable state grants may be less at UArts than if used at a college in a student’s home state.

Residents of states not listed above are prevented by their state from using their state grants in Pennsylvania.

Verification

Your application for financial aid may be selected for a process called verification.

The purpose of verification is to find and correct common mistakes made during the filing of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). All need-based aid packaging must be put on hold until a student provides the necessary information necessary to complete the verification process. If the verification process is not completed, a student will not be considered for any need-based financial aid. Thus, it is important to return the information and requested documentation as soon as possible. Processing usually takes about three weeks, but can take longer in peak processing periods.

The federal government randomly selects FAFSA applicants for verification. Students may also be flagged for verification if conflicting information is reported on the FAFSA.

Frequently Asked Questions About Verification:

Why was I selected for Verification? - The federal government randomly selects FAFSA applicants for verification. Students may also be flagged for verification if conflicting or confusing information is reported on the FAFSA.
When will I be notified if I am selected for Verification? - You will be notified of your selection for verification approximately 7-10 days after your FAFSA results have been received by UArts. The result of your FAFSA is referred to as a Student Aid Report (SAR).
What will I need to provide if I am selected for Verification? - If your application is selected for further review, you will be asked to submit signed statements confirming information you reported when completing the FAFSA. The Office of Financial Aid will send a letter requesting the needed documentation. Examples of documentation include copy of tax forms and the verification worksheets.

 

 

Types of Aid

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Each student who completes a FAFSA will be considered for all of the following types of aid. Parental enrollment will not be considered when eligibility for University aid is calculated.

Institutional Scholarships and Grants

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University Scholarships

University Scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic excellence and demonstrated talent. The Presidential, Promising Artist, and Artist Grant are types of University Scholarships.

University Scholarships are awarded when students are admitted. Those students who demonstrate exceptional artistic ability and outstanding academic achievement will be considered for University scholarships.

To assist students and their families with financial planning for their enrollment, scholarship amounts are fixed and renewable so long as the student makes academic progress.

Named Scholarships

The University offers a number of scholarships that have been donated by individuals or groups to help support promising artists. These named scholarships are awarded based on need and/or and merit and/or other criteria.

University Grant

University Grants are generally need-based and are awarded by the Financial Aid Office to supplement all other financial aid assistance.

Students must be enrolled for at least 12 credits in order to receive Institutional Aid that is merit or need-based.

 

Federal/State Grants

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Pell Grant

The Pell Grant is a federally funded program that awards individual grants in amounts ranging from $400 to $4,050. Pell Grants are awarded to students who have not received a bachelor’s degree nor been aided for the maximum number of semesters allowed and meet all other eligibility criteria.

Eligibility is determined by the federal government and notification is sent directly to the student in the form of a Student Aid Report (SAR). The student should expect to receive the SAR approximately four weeks after the FAFSA has been filed. The SAR should be reviewed for accuracy and corrected if necessary. The correct SAR should be retained by the student as confirmation of receipt of the FAFSA. Students must enroll for at least three credits in order to be eligible for the Pell Grant.

University scholarships are awarded when students are admitted. Those students who demonstrate exceptional artistic ability and outstanding academic achievement will be considered for University scholarships.

To assist students and their families with financial planning for their enrollment, scholarship amounts are fixed and renewable so long as the student makes academic progress.

PHEAA Grant

Awards are made to Pennsylvania residents who have not attained the bachelor’s degree nor been aided for the maximum number of semesters allowed (eight).

Eligible students must demonstrate financial need, Pennsylvania residency, and be enrolled for at least six credits. To continue to be eligible for state grant assistance, a full-time student must complete a minimum of 24 credits per academic year.

An award letter may indicate an estimated state grant amount; however, eligibility is determined by the state and official notification is sent directly to the student beginning in May.

NOTE: Students must meet state residency requirements in accordance with PHEAA guidelines. PHEAA’s filing deadline is May 1.

Other states have scholarship programs for their residents. Information and applications are available from the respective state boards of education.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG is a federally funded University administered program. These grants are awarded to needy students who do not hold a bachelor’s degree. Typically, FSEOG grants are first awarded to Pell Grant recipients who have met the filing deadlines on a funds-available basis.

Outside Scholarships

The University encourages students to explore all options for outside scholarship assistance. Local businesses, foundations, churches, unions, civic organizations, etc., often sponsor scholarships that can be used toward educational costs.

A good place to begin the search for outside scholarships is online at www.fastweb.com. This is a free scholarship search service.

The University of the Arts does not recommend that students pay fees for financial aid information, or for scholarship searches.

Students who receive outside awards or scholarships are required by Federal regulation to notify the Office of Financial Aid. Notification of all grants and scholarships will be included in the award letter.

Student Loans

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Federal Student loans are available at low interest rates, and with extended repayment terms to assist students in meeting both tuition and living expenses. Because loan indebtedness has serious implications, students should carefully consider the amount of their borrowing (both yearly and cumulative) and borrow the minimum necessary to reasonably meet those expenses that remain above the Financial Aid Award.

All students, regardless of state of residency, may borrow from a Pennsylvania bank and are urged to do so. New students should go to http://www.aessuccess.org to complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN). Students who have previously received a Stafford using an MPN are not required to file another MPN for 10 years. Students and parents who wish to use PHEAA lenders must submit all loan applications (MPN and PLUS) directly to PHEAA. Students and parents who wish to use out-of-state guarantors must submit loan applications to the University’s Financial Aid Office.

If the student has previously borrowed under any of the student loan programs, he or she is encouraged to use the same bank to avoid having multiple loan payments upon graduation.

All loan applications are based on the FAFSA application; thus this application must be completed before the loan application. While the loan application is an element of the Financial Aid application process, it is also a separate transaction between the student and his or her bank. It is critical that the student understand that it is he or she alone who is responsible for repaying funds borrowed, and that for most students this will be the most serious long-term financial obligation yet undertaken.

All first-time borrowers are required to complete an Entrance Interview form before the University will release loan funds. This can be done at http://www.aessuccess.org.

 

Student Loan Programs

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Federal Stafford Student Loan (Stafford)

A Stafford loan cannot be approved until a complete FAFSA has been processed.

Students wishing to use proceeds from the Stafford loan must submit a complete application by March 15. Students can apply electronically at http://www.aessuccess.org.

Under federal regulations, only one Stafford loan may be processed for each student each year.

Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate students are required to register for at least six credits each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford program. Stafford loan eligibility is determined based upon the number of credits the undergraduate student has completed, according to the following schedule:

0 - 29.75 credits

  Freshman maximum   $2,625

30 - 59.75 credits

  Sophomore maximum   $3,500

60 - 89.75 credits

  Junior maximum   $5,500
90 + credits   Senior maximum   $5,500

The above loan amounts may be subsidized or unsubsidized depending upon the student’s financial eligibility. If the loan is subsidized the student is not responsible for making any interest or principal payments during enrollment. If the loan is unsubsidized the student is responsible for making interest payments during enrollment.
Undergraduate students who are independent and dependent students whose parents cannot qualify for the PLUS loan are eligible for the following additional amounts under the Unsubsidized Stafford Program:

0 - 29.75 credits   Freshman maximum   $4,000
30 - 59.75 credits   Sophomore maximum   $4,000
60 - 89.75 credits   Junior maximum   $5,000
90 + credits   Senior maximum   $5,000

Most Stafford loans will be disbursed to the University electronically and will not require the student’s signature.
If a student loan is disbursed by check, it cannot be credited to his/her account until he/she signs the check. (Stafford loan checks will be available in the Finance Office for signature; PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent borrower.)

Graduate Students

Graduate Students are required to register for at least 4.5 credits each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford program.

Subsidized Stafford Loan

Subsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to   $ 8,500
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to   $10,000
     
Total graduate maximum Stafford eligibility per academic year   $18,500

Parent Plus Loan For Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

The parent of a dependent student may borrow up to the cost of education (which includes living expenses) minus any other financial aid the student is scheduled to receive. Repayment begins 60 days after loan funds have been disbursed. The PLUS loan interest rate is variable and caps at nine percent. Approval for the PLUS loan is based upon credit history.

Typically the loan application process requires six to eight weeks. In order to deduct the anticipated proceeds from a PLUS loan from the invoice, the loan must have been approved. The PLUS loan cannot be certified until a complete FAFSA has been processed.

Disbursement Amounts

The lender may deduct origination and insurance fees from Stafford, PLUS, and other alternative loans before they are disbursed. These fees can total up to four percent (or more for some alternative loans) of the principal amount; thus, the amount available from the loan to pay educational costs may be less than the amount borrowed.

The lender will deduct origination and insurance fees from Stafford and PLUS loans before they are disbursed. These fees can total up to four percent of the principal amount borrowed. Thus, the amount available from the loan to pay educational costs may be less than the amount initially borrowed.

Students who are in default on a federal loan are not eligible for Stafford or Perkins loans or other financial aid while enrolled at The University of the Arts.

PHEAA Loan Line (to check on the status of your loan): 1-800-692-7392 or http://www.aessuccess.org.
Remember: If a student uses his/her Stafford or PLUS loan proceeds toward the fall invoice, he/she must submit the loan application(s) by March 15.

Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins)

Perkins is a federal loan that is need-based and is awarded by the University. The Federal Perkins Loan is currently offered at a fixed five percent interest rate and is repayable to the University over a maximum 10-year period. Repayment begins nine months after graduation or cessation of at least half-time enrollment at an eligible institution in an approved program of study.

Because Perkins loan funds are limited, this loan is offered to the earliest applicants whose Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is lowest. Perkins loans are usually awarded to Freshman and Sophomore students (Junior and Senior students have greater eligibility for Stafford loans). Notification of eligibility for this loan is included in the award letter.

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins promissory note in the Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be credited until a complete, correct note is negotiated.

NJ CLASS Loan

If a student’s parent is a New Jersey resident, he/she may be interested in the NJ CLASS loan, which may allow payments to be deferred while the student is enrolled. For information and application forms call 1-800-792-8670 or visit http://www.hesaa.org.

Student Employment

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Federal Work Study (FWS)

FWS is a federally funded program administered by the University. Eligibility for this program is based upon the availability of funds to the University and the student’s EFC.

The Financial Aid Office will make a determination of the student’s eligibility to earn money through the FWS Program. Notification of eligibility will be included in the Award letter.

An FWS award is not an offer or a guarantee of a job; it is the amount a student is eligible to earn should she or he secure a job. Work study awards are not applied against the invoice. Payment is made directly to employed students by a University payroll check.

Eligible students are permitted to work up to 20 hours weekly when classes are in session. Students are paid at least minimum wage, and hours may be arranged to accommodate the class schedule. The FWS award can be used between July 1, 2006, and June 30, 2007.

Jobs are usually available throughout the University in academic departments, security, University offices, the library, etc. Positions require various levels of skill and experience.

For students who are interested in working in the larger community, there are several off-campus work study positions available. These jobs are located at sites such as community and arts organizations, theaters, and museums.

The Student Employment Handbook contains expanded information about FWS and NFWS, job openings, and additional information for fall placement. The handbook is available in the Financial Aid Office in late summer.

Non-Federal Work Study (NFWS)

Students who do not qualify to work under the Federal Work Study program may work on campus under the NFWS program.

Information about job availability and placement is as listed in the Federal Work Study section.

The Student Employment Handbook details all of the regulations governing the Federal and non-Federal Work Study programs.

Students are reminded that falsifying time cards is a criminal offense, which can subject them to criminal prosecution, disciplinary action, expulsion, and loss of all financial aid.

 

Award Notification

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Award letters will be sent to new students beginning in March and to returning students beginning in June. The Financial Aid Office staff will be available to counsel students at any point during the application process. Students should be aware that some aid is conditional on the availability of funds to the University, and if these funds are reduced, the University will reduce aid accordingly.

Students must return a signed award letter with acceptance of aid. Failure to return the award letter may result in cancellation of aid.

If an award is estimated, that means some additional steps must be taken before the student can receive those funds, such as completing verification. To receive the Stafford, the student must submit the loan application and his/her funds must be disbursed. Stafford loan proceeds are disbursed electronically or by paper check. He/she must endorse the Perkins loan promissory note in order for this loan to be credited to his/her account.

Additional steps are required to claim these forms of financial aid:

Federal Work Study

In order to claim a FWS award the student must locate an eligible job. Once hired, the student must come to the Financial Aid Office to complete the necessary payroll paperwork. Students cannot work, nor can they be paid, until this paperwork is submitted and proper identification is documented. FWS cannot be deducted from the tuition invoice.

Pell Grant

Approximately four weeks after the FAFSA is filed, the student will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). This document will notify a student as to Pell Grant eligibility. All of the information on the SAR must be correct and complete.

The award letter will list the Pell Grant amount. Changes to the FAFSA information may affect the student’s Pell Grant eligibility.

Perkins Loan

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins promissory note in the Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be credited until a complete, correct note is negotiated.

PLUS and Stafford Loans

These loans must be applied for through the student’s lender. Proceeds from these loans are disbursed to the University. Most Stafford loans will be disbursed to the University electronically and will not require the student’s signature. If a student loan is disbursed by check, it cannot be credited to his/her account until he/she signs the check. (Stafford loan checks will be available in the Student Billing Office for signature; PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent borrower.)

The award notice is subject to revision under the following circumstances:

  1. If government funding levels to the University are reduced, individual awards will be adjusted accordingly.
  2. Verification - The Financial Aid Office is required by federal regulation to resolve any discrepancies in information submitted per verification with that already in a student’s file. Any discrepancies may result in revision to a student’s aid amounts and/or types.
  3. As above, if at any point in the year we become aware of information that conflicts with other documentation in the student’s file, we will resolve the discrepancy and revise the award accordingly.
  4. Outside Scholarships - Per federal regulation, a student is not permitted to be “overawarded.” That is, a student’s total amount of scholarships, grants, loans, and work study may not exceed the student’s calculated need. If a student would be overawarded due to an outside scholarship, we are required to adjust the other elements of the aid package to eliminate the overaward. We encourage students to seek outside scholarships, and will adjust institutional aid only if absolutely necessary.
  5. The University may substitute other aid funds of equal amount and type at any point in the year at its discretion and without any notice.
  6. If the student changes enrollment status

Special Circumstances

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Income Reduction

The FAFSA collects information about a family’s income and assets from the previous year (2005). For most people this information is a good predictor of the current year’s (2006) income, since most people do not experience wide swings in income from year to year.

If, however, a family’s income in the current year will be significantly different (more than 10 percent) from last year’s, the family should notify the Financial Aid Office in writing, including all available documentation. Reductions in income that are caused by involuntary job loss, unusually high unreimbursed medical expenses, separation, divorce, death of a wage earner, or the like will be considered.

If a family’s circumstances meet these criteria, the University will calculate the financial aid award based upon the estimated current year (2006) figures for the fall semester. At the end of the fall semester the family will be required to provide documentation (such as final pay stub or an estimated 2006 return) for evaluation of the spring semester’s award.

Unfortunately, the University is not able to consider reductions in income due to voluntary job changes, back taxes owed, high consumer debt, multiple mortgages, employment bonuses received in the previous year, overtime, self-employment losses, fluctuations in income from commission sales, or discretionary purchases.

Divorce or Separation

When a married student or parent separates from or divorces his/her spouse subsequent to the filing of the financial aid application, the custodial parent should notify the Financial Aid Office in writing.

In the case of separation or divorce, the Financial Aid Office is permitted to discuss the student’s record only with the custodial parent.

Death

Sadly, the University occasionally is called upon to assist a student whose parent or spouse has died subsequent to the filing of the financial aid application. Should this occur, the Financial Aid Office should be contacted immediately, and it will offer every assistance possible.

Dependency Override

The Financial Aid Office is occasionally asked to re-evaluate a student’s status due to the student’s assertion that he or she should be considered independent of parental support.

The guidelines for dependency are set by federal law, and thus each student must first be evaluated against them. A dependent student is someone who is younger than 24, is not a veteran, is not a graduate or professional student, is not married, is not an orphan or ward of the court, or does not have legal dependents.

An independent student is someone who is older than 24, a veteran, a graduate or professional student, married, or has legal dependents. (See the FAFSA.)

Federal and institutional policy is that the first responsibility for college costs is the student’s and his/her family’s; thus appeals are rarely granted.

A student who wishes to be considered independent must write a letter of appeal to the Financial Aid Office. The letter must clearly state the reasons for appealing the dependency status. The student will be required to document his/her means of support as well as other items. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

Other Appeals

The Financial Aid office cannot consider proposals based on any circumstances other than those listed above. Regrettably, the University cannot reconsider the financial aid award in response to offers from competing institutions or as a means of recognizing the student’s academic or artistic achievement.

 

Academic Progress

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Students who receive assistance in any form, which includes but is not limited to University grant, scholarship, State grant, Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, FWS, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal PLUS/Stafford, etc., must maintain satisfactory academic progress in their program of study in order to continue to receive those funds.

Satisfactory academic progress for students at the University is defined as

  1. earning between 12 and 18 credits each semester, and
  2. maintaining a minimum cumulative and semester grade-point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 (“C” average).

If a student’s semester or cumulative grade-point average is below 2.0 (“C” average), he or she may be placed on probation and will be required to attain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average by the end of the next semester and meet other requirements as specified by the Academic Review.

Students may be required to maintain a GPA higher than 2.0 or earn minimum grades in particular courses in some departments or majors. Thus, it is possible to be placed on probation at higher GPAs.

A student who does not meet the requirements will jeopardize his/her financial aid eligibility.

Students who have had two semesters of consecutive academic probation are not eligible to receive financial aid of any type during a third consecutive semester of academic probation.

Students who are placed on Academic Probation will lose their University-sponsored scholarship, e.g.: Presidential, Promising Artist, and Artist Grant.

Students who have been dismissed from the University are not eligible for financial assistance of any kind during the first semester of re-enrollment, when the first semester of re-enrollment is at least the student’s third semester of censure.

Insufficient Credit Accumulation

In addition to the qualitative standard “good standing” (GPA), students are also required to meet a quantitative measure of academic progress (rate of credit accumulation). Students who receive merit- and/or need-based aid must earn sufficient credits each semester toward graduation. Students who enroll for at least 12 credits during a given semester must complete, with a grade of “D” or higher, at least 12 credits in order to continue to receive financial assistance.

Although 12 credits is the minimum per-semester credit accumulation to maintain eligibility for financial assistance, the student will NOT be on track to graduate in four years at this rate. Also, “D” grades will cause the student to fail the qualitative (GPA) progress standard.

Each student’s total credit accumulation is reviewed at the end of each semester. Students who complete fewer than 24 credits per academic year will be placed on FINANCIAL AID PROBATION for the following semester. If, by the end of the probationary semester, the student has not earned at least 36 credits (for the three-semester period being reviewed), the student then loses his/her eligibility for financial assistance. Students may fail the quantitative standard regardless of GPA.

The student’s eligibility for financial assistance will be restored when the student has earned at least 36 credits and has met all other academic progress requirements.

PHEAA Grants

The state grant agency requires that a student earn a minimum of 24 credits each academic year in order to continue to receive state grant assistance. Any student who earns fewer than 24 credits will not be eligible for his/her state grant for the first semester of the following year. Students who enroll for a single semester are required to earn at least 12 credits to retain their PHEAA Grant. The University will not replace funds for which the students have lost eligibility.

Financial Aid Academic Progress Appeals

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University-Administered Financial Aid

The University reviews the academic standing of all students at the conclusion of each semester. Students who have not met the academic progress standards required for continued financial aid eligibility have the following options for appealing loss of aid.

Please note-under federal privacy guidelines we are only permitted to discuss academic matters with the student.

If the student wishes to appeal the loss of financial aid, except PHEAA state grant, he or she may do so in writing to the Financial Aid Office. (PHEAA state grant appeals must be addressed to PHEAA). Appeals are reviewed by the Financial Aid Appeal Committee. Appeal letters must be written by the student and must document significant, unusual circumstances that contributed to academic difficulties. (Significant circumstances include events like major illness, severe injury, or family upheaval such as death or divorce.) Students are required to provide documentation of the circumstances upon which the appeal is based.

In order to be considered, the appeal letter requesting reinstatement of aid for a given semester must be received in the Financial Aid Office prior to the first day of classes for that semester. Students are cautioned that the committee that reviews financial aid appeals meets on an as-needed basis and generally requires approximately three weeks to respond to appeals. Appeals that are submitted close to the beginning of any semester are unlikely to be reviewed prior to the start of classes. Thus, students should be prepared to pay their invoice in full. If the appeal is granted the student will be reimbursed from any credit balance created by reinstated financial aid.

The University does not have the authority to make exceptions to federal financial aid policies and will not entertain any requests to do so. For example, federal law requires that students be enrolled on an at least half-time basis for Stafford loan eligibility. The University cannot and will not make exceptions to this and other federal regulations.

Students who have been placed on academic probation and wish to appeal their probationary status should follow the guidelines under the Academic Review section in this catalog.

For those financial aid policies under which the University has discretionary authority to make exceptions, the Financial Aid Appeal Committee’s decisions are final and cannot be further appealed.

PHEAA State Grant Appeals

The University has no authority to make exceptions to PHEAA state grant policies. Students wishing to appeal the loss of state grants must write a letter of appeal to PHEAA. Appeal letters must include documentation of those significant events (major illness, severe injury, or family upheaval such as divorce or death) that impacted the student’s academic performance. Students wishing to appeal the loss of state grant eligibility are urged to do so as soon as such information is known, as the state requires several weeks (typically 8-10) to respond to appeals.

 

Change in Enrollment Status

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Unless specifically designated otherwise, all awards are issued based upon the student’s anticipated enrollment as a full-time undergraduate (completing 12 credits or more per semester, in a degree-granting program).

Students who become less than full-time or who enroll as “non-degree” may lose their eligibility for aid in full or in part.

The Financial Aid Office periodically reviews all student accounts and will immediately remove any aid credited to the account of a student who has failed to satisfy progress or enrollment requirements as above.

Students who are considering withdrawing (either from the University or from individual classes) are urged to meet with a financial aid counselor to discuss the impact of the withdrawal on their eligibility for aid. Please read the information about refunds in the “Tuition and Expenses” section of this Catalog.

Students are reminded that withdrawing from their courses (either in full or in part) may cause them to lose their eligibility for aid in current and future semesters.

To avoid unexpected balances, students must contact the Financial Aid Office with any questions pertaining to this subject.

Graduate Students

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Graduate students are eligible to apply for Stafford loans and should refer to the section on student loans for further information. Graduate students may also be eligible for assistantships or fellowships through the department in which they are enrolled. Contact the departmental office for additional information and application instructions.

Graduate students are required to maintain satisfactory academic progress in order to continue to receive financial aid as specified in this catalog.

Students who have attained a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent are not eligible to receive Pell, PHEAA, FSEOG, FWS, Perkins, and most other forms of financial aid including institutional grants.

Graduate students who are in default on a federal student loan are not eligible to receive assistance of any type while enrolled at the University.

The following Website is helpful for graduate students: http://www.gradschools.com.

 

Summer MFA Students

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Students who enroll at least half-time (4.5 credits) in the Summer MFA program may borrow under the Stafford Loan program.

Students who matriculated as of June 2000 and follow the 12, 4.5, 4.5 credit pattern are permitted to borrow during all semesters of enrollments and qualify for deferments; these students may borrow up to $18,500.

Students who matriculated prior to June 2000 and follow the 10, 3, 3 credit pattern are not permitted to borrow during the fall and spring semesters. Summer MFA students who are enrolled less than half-time are not permitted to borrow and do not qualify for deferments.

 

Transfer Students

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Transfer undergraduates are eligible for aid and should apply following the same application procedures as other undergraduates (with exceptions listed below).

All transfer students may be required to submit a Financial Aid Transcript (FAT) from each prior post-secondary institution attended in the current year, whether or not financial aid was received while enrolled. This regulation applies to transfer students who enroll beginning in January. It does not apply to transfer students who enroll beginning in September.

Transfer students who have borrowed the undergraduate maximum under the Stafford program are not eligible for continued Stafford assistance while enrolled at the University.

Any transfer student who is in default on a federal loan is ineligible for financial aid of any type while enrolled at the University.

Transfer students who enroll for the spring semester should be aware that financial aid received for enrollment during the fall semester at another institution is not transferable. Students must reapply for most forms of aid at the University. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information and instructions.

 

Bachelor’s Degree Holders

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Students who have earned a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent and who enroll as undergraduates are eligible to apply for Stafford loans (with exceptions below). In some cases these students may also be eligible for University-sponsored aid. Students are not eligible to receive Pell, PHEAA, FSEOG, and Perkins.

Students who have already borrowed the undergraduate maximum under the Stafford program are ineligible for continued Stafford assistance while enrolled at the University.

Those who are in default on a federal student loan are not eligible for aid of any type while enrolled at the University.

Part-Time Students

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Part-time students who are enrolled in degree programs may be eligible for Pell, University, and PHEAA grants, as well as Stafford loans.

Part-time students are subject to all requirements governing the financial aid programs, except that they be enrolled full-time.

Part-time students are not eligible for merit-based aid.

Part-time students should follow application procedures as detailed in this catalog.

 

Continuing Education Students

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Students who enroll through the Continuing Education program are eligible for a very limited selection of loan programs. Continuing Education students are not eligible for any other type of financial aid. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

International Students

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Students who are neither U.S. citizens nor eligible noncitizens (as confirmed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service) are not eligible to receive any form of Federal Title IV financial aid while enrolled at The University of the Arts.

International students will be reviewed for scholarships when offered admission. Those students who demonstrate exceptional academic and artistic ability in their portfolio review or audition will be considered for the University’s Scholarship Program.

International students may be eligible to borrow money through a very limited selection of loan programs. International students must have a U.S. citizen co-signer. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

Useful Website: http://www.edupass.org.

 

Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study

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Foreign and summer study opportunities are available through programs hosted by other regionally accredited U.S. institutions. Students who wish to study abroad or at another U.S. school for one or two semesters as part of the degree program at UArts will need the advice and approval of their department chair/director, and a written agreement in advance of the courses noting how they will transfer back into the degree program. Interested students should begin by making an appointment with the Director of International Student Programs to discuss their plans at least six months before the program begins.

Appointments with the Registrar, Financial Aid, and Billing offices are also recommended when planning for off-campus study. As part of this process, students must complete the Petition for Off Campus Study. This Petition process serves several purposes: it maintains the student’s status at UArts as an active degree candidate; it documents the approval of off-campus coursework for transfer credits; and, when applicable, registers the student for the place-holder credits necessary to the financial aid allocation process. Refer to the [Registering for Other Categories of Study] for more information on the petition process.

Please note, in some cases, the student may register and pay tuition at the host institution. In other cases, it may be to the student’s advantage to register and pay tuition at UArts. The following information should be used to assist in determining if study abroad will be a viable option, and to help plan for the related financial responsibilities. If the host school is more expensive, the student will be responsible for the difference of cost.

Financial Aid that can be used abroad or at another school includes:

  1. Federal Pell Grant
  2. Federal SEOG
  3. Federal Perkins Loan
  4. PHEAA State Grant
  5. Federal Stafford Loan
  6. Federal Plus Loan

These forms of aid are subject to reduction if costs for study abroad programs are less than costs at The University of the Arts.

Financial Aid that cannot be used abroad or, at another institution includes all University-sponsored aid, such as:

  1. Talent Scholarship
  2. Presidential Scholarship
  3. University Grant
  4. Promising Artist Award
  5. Artist Grant
  6. Named Scholarships
  7. Graduate Grants, Scholarships, and Assistantships

Students who plan to study abroad should apply for financial aid adhering to normal deadlines and procedures. Additionally, such students must provide The University of the Arts’ Financial Aid Office with the following:

  1. Contact person at coordinating university or college including their address, telephone, and fax numbers.
  2. Power of Attorney, duly executed (if documents will require your signature in your absence).
  3. Consortium Agreement, completed (available from the Financial Aid Office).
  4. Contact Financial Aid Office before final departure. It will be necessary to maintain close contact with our office to assure aid is processed before you leave the country.

Reminders:

  1. The study abroad program must be approved by both the academic dean and the University’s Office of the Registrar. Contact those offices for additional information and procedures.
  2. Students must begin all paperwork at least six months prior to the semester abroad.
  3. In most countries students will not be permitted to earn wages, so they should be prepared to have sufficient spending money.
  4. Students may not use financial aid for unapproved programs abroad. In order to be eligible for financial aid, the student must enroll through a college or university that is approved for participation in the Federal Title IV programs.
  5. Students may not use the extended payment plan (TMS) to pay for tuition.

 

Budgets

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Educational costs include not only tuition and fees, but also indirect costs such as room, food, books, supplies, and personal expenses. Direct costs reflect the actual amount a student will be billed by the University. Indirect costs are what a typical student might expect for out-of-pocket expenses such as supplies, books, clothing, food, medical expenses, personal items, and transportation over a nine-month period.

Naturally, one’s own habits and personal spending patterns will dramatically influence these costs. Therefore, these are estimates only.

These factors are used in formulating a student’s budget and determining financial need. The Financial Aid Office will assign each student a budget depending on the information provided on the FAFSA. If the budgets shown below differ significantly from the expenses you expect to incur, please inform the Financial Aid Office.
While certain academic departments may recommend that students have their own computers, the University’s students are not required to provide their own computers. Therefore, the University will not accept responsibility for the funding of student-owned machines. Students interested in purchasing computers are welcome to contact the Academic Computing Office for advice on hardware and software selection, and information on the educational discounts available. For more information, please refer to the Academic Computing section of the portal at http://myuarts.uarts.edu.

 

Estimated Expenses for 2006-2007

These figures are intended for your use in estimating your costs for the upcoming academic year.

    Commuter   Resident/
Off-Campus
  Graduate
Tuition (12-18 credits)  

$24,730

 

$24,730

 

$24,730

General Fee  

$950

 

$950

 

$950

Housing  

-

 

$6,345

 

-

Subtotal  

$25,680

 

$32,025

 

$25,680

   

 

 

 

 

 

Indirect Expenses  

 

 

 

 

 

Books & Supplies  

$2,000

 

$2,000

 

$2,000

Housing  

$4,322

 

-

 

$8,631

Food  

$1,566

 

$1,566

 

$1,566

Personal Expenses  

$1,622

 

$1,622

 

$1,622

Transportation  

$1,068

 

$801

 

$1,068

Estimated Total  

$36,258

 

$38,014

 

$40,567

Definitions

Commuters

Students who live within reasonable commuting distance of the University and reside with parents or relatives.

Resident/Off-Campus

Students who reside in University-owned housing or who reside in housing that is owned by neither the University nor their parents or relatives. Students who live within commuting distance of the University will not be funded as residents, or as off-campus.

Graduate Students

Most graduate students maintain their own homes and have correspondingly higher living expenses. Graduate students who live with parents or relatives will be assigned a commuter budget.

Part-Time Students

Budgets for part-time students are determined on an individual basis.

Tuition Tax Benefits

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 includes tax credits for education. The Hope Scholarship is a tax credit of up to $1,500 that covers 100 percent of the first $1,000 in qualified tuition and related expenses, and up to 50 percent of the second $1,000, required for enrollment during the first two years of college.

The Hope tax credit is generally available for tuition and fees paid, less grants and scholarships, for classes that begin on or after January 1, 1998. The credit is phased out for single taxpayers with adjusted gross income between $40,000 and $50,000 ($80,000 to $100,000 for joint returns). Students who do not qualify for the Hope Scholarship may qualify for the Lifetime Learning Credit.

For specific information about how these tax credits may affect you, contact your tax professional.

 

Confidentiality and Privacy of Financial Aid Information

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FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974)

Under FERPA, educational privacy and access rights accrue to the student when she/he turns 18 OR enrolls in a post-secondary institution. The University of the Arts is a post-secondary institution. Persons who have applied to but who have not attended the University as an enrolled student are not covered under FERPA. Under institutional policy, applicants are extended the same privacy and access rights to their Financial aid information as students.

Applicants, students, and parents should be aware of the following institutional Financial Aid privacy policies.

The Office of Financial Aid staff is permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose a student’s financial aid information to the following parties:

  1. The student
  2. The student’s parent(s) whose information appears on the FAFSA
  3. Other University officials having a legitimate educational reason to know the student’s financial aid information (e.g. staff in the billing office so that they can manage the student’s account)
  4. External agencies and organizations such as guarantors, lenders, state grant agencies, and auditors that have a legitimate reason to know the student’s financial aid information (i.e. staff at such agencies authorized to process loans and grants for the student)
  5. External federal agencies granted such rights under FERPA (e.g. DOE, INS, CSPCA, et cetera). Under FERPA, institutions are required to disclose a student’s information (sometimes without notification to the student) in response to commands from the courts (typically subpoenas) and demands from specific federal agencies. The Financial Aid staff will comply with all lawfully issued demands for information from the entities identified in the FERPA regulations and will (or will not) notify the student as required.

Students and parents should be aware that their signatures on the FAFSA and other financial aid documents (e.g. loan applications) authorize the release of their information to certain federal and state agencies. Please read the FAFSA and other financial aid documents for more information.

Depending upon the scope of the information requested by the student or other authorized parties, the Financial Aid Office may require time to present the records requested. When the information requested cannot be produced immediately the Financial Aid Office may require such time as is permitted under FERPA regulations to retrieve and present the records requested.

The Financial Aid staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose a student’s financial aid information to others including but not limited to:

  1. the student’s parent(s) or stepparent(s) whose information does not appear on the FAFSA (the non-filing parent) without written permission from the student and the filing parent
  2. the student’s parent(s) or stepparent(s) whose information does appear on the FAFSA when the parents have separated or divorced and the other parent has been identified as the custodial parent, without written permission from the student and the custodial parent
  3. high school guidance counselors and teachers
  4. the student’s spouse
  5. interested relatives, neighbors, and friends

The Office of Financial Aid Staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose academic information (which includes but is not limited to scholarship eligibility, financial aid eligibility, grades, grade-point average, academic standing, or probationary status) to anyone (except the federal and state agencies responsible for processing the student’s financial aid or having authority under FERPA to access such information) other than the student (whether or not the student is dependent, whether or not the parent pays the invoice) without the student’s written authorization.

Disclosure Authorization

When extraordinary circumstances exist that prevent the student from accessing and understanding Financial Aid information the Financial Aid staff will discuss normally confidential information with the individual(s) the student designates on the disclosure authorization form. Students may request a disclosure authorization form from the Financial Aid Office. Students must complete and sign the disclosure authorization form in the Financial Aid Office in the presence of a Financial Aid staff member. Students can rescind the disclosure authorization at any time. Due to the highly sensitive nature of financial aid and academic information, facsimiles, photocopies or mailed disclosure authorization forms will not be accepted.

Rights and Responsibilities

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The receipt of financial aid is a privilege, which creates both rights and responsibilities.

Students have the right to know the method used to determine their need; the right to have access to information and records used in determining need; and the right to be awarded aid as equitably as funds permit.

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for accurately portraying financial resources and circumstances and notifying the Financial Aid Office of any changes in status; for applying in a timely manner; and for maintaining satisfactory academic progress and good standing.

Students who fail to maintain adequate progress may be placed on probation. Failure to correct academic deficiency will result in the loss of financial aid until the required credits and grade-point average have been earned.

Students or parents who knowingly provide false information on any financial aid form (financial aid forms include but are not limited to the FAFSA, verification forms, Work Study time cards and loan applications) will be denied financial aid and will be refused for all subsequent years without the possibility of appeal. Additionally, students so identified will be billed for all aid disbursed and may face prosecution by the Department of Education, which may result in fine, imprisonment, or both.

While the Financial Aid Office staff is available to assist students through the application process, it is the student’s responsibility to see to the correctness and completeness of his or her application. If a student receives notification that his/her FAFSA or loan application is incomplete, the student must determine what is necessary to complete the application(s) and submit the required information.

An application for financial aid will have no effect on the decision concerning admission. The admission decision is made without access to financial aid data.

Application for 2007-2008

  • File the 2007-2008 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 15, 2007.
  • Register for the Fall 2007 semester in April 2007.

Additional Sources of Financial Aid

A helpful way to begin the search for additional financial assistance is on the Internet at http://www.fastweb.com. Additional financial aid Websites are listed below. Students are cautioned not to pay for financial aid information; these are free Websites. The Financial Aid Office also maintains a notebook of scholarships.

http://www.pheaa.org
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov
http://www.finaid.org
http://www.fastweb.com
http://www.wiredscholar.com
http://www.ed.gov
http://www.usagroup.com
http://www.cns.gov

 

For Additional Information

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Listed below are numbers to call if a student receives an incomplete notification or does not receive notification within six weeks of application filing.

To check the status of your FAFSA:
     
1-319-337-5665
1-800-4-FEDAID
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov
   
     
PHEAA Grant Line
1-800-692-7435
http://www.pheaa.org
  PHEAA Loan Line
1-800-692-7392
http://www.pheaa.org
     
The University of the Arts
1-800-616-ARTS
http://www.uarts.edu
  Office of Financial Aid
1-215-717-6170
fax 1-215-717-6178
http://www.finaid@uarts.edu

 

 

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