May 20, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Crafts

  
  •  

    GRGL 311 - Advanced Glass

    3 credits
    Glass is considered as an expressive medium, and development toward a personal style is encouraged. Students work with hot glass in advanced offhand work, blowing into molds, casting, and enameling, as well as advanced stained glass work and incorporation of blown and cast pieces into two- and three-dimensional structures.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.


Crafts - Fibers

  
  •  

    CRFB 211 - Introduction to Fibers Mixed Media

    3 credits
    An introduction to both traditional and experimental uses of materials and structural processes in the fabric media. Assignments focus on the exploration of two- and three-dimensional forms in preparation for versatile approaches to the fibers media. A range of off-loom mixed media techniques are covered.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 212 - Introduction to Color and the Loom

    3 credits
    Students explore the potential of two- and three-dimensional forms in preparation for versatile approaches to the fibers media. Loom, woven structures, tapestry, and woven color are covered.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 221 - Fabric Resist & Embellishment

    3 credits
    Extends students’ basic color and drawing vocabulary through exposure to ancient techniques and tools of Indonesia, Japan, and Africa. Fabric dyeing and resist methods are addressed, including drawing and stamping with waxes, stitching and binding with threads, etc. Students acquire a broader sense of “”mark-making,”” an understanding of the special color properties of dyes, and an ability to use non-Western traditional craft methods to create contemporary art fabric.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 222 - Introduction to Constructed Surface

    3 credits
    Through a series of developmental assignments, students are provided with a solid technical and conceptual base in the fabric media. Non-loom constructions, color, and multifiber dye techniques are covered.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 223 - Fabric Printing

    1.5 credits
    Focuses on the fundamental principles of translating drawings and photographs into designs and images for screen-printed fabric, using a fine art approach. Exploration of myriad possibilities in creating fabric using silkscreen and fabric pigments.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 227 - Experimental Costume and Performance

    3 credits
    The garment provides a tangible yet pliable boundary between the space of self and the space of the world. In this introductory fibers studio, students learn costume construction fundamentals (hand and machine sewing, millinery, flat pattern design, etc.) and explore the garment as a vehicle for personal expression. Students are encouraged to experiment with technique, and a variety of both traditional and unconventional materials are used. Concurrent with studio work, students are introduced to the cultural, political, social, historic, and aesthetic dimensions of costume as it relates to contemporary art. The semester concludes with a collaborative performance.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 311 - Advanced Fibers Mixed Media

    3 credits
    Through a series of developmental assignments with a conceptual emphasis and by using acquired knowledge from previous semesters, students are encouraged to explore forms that reveal the inherent physical qualities and potential image-making possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven and mixed-media fabric techniques are used as appropriate, depending on the student’s interest in the development of a diverse range of two-dimensional constructions, sculptural forms, costume, etc.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRFB*211, CRFB*212, or CRFB*222

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 312 - Advanced Fibers Mixed Media

    3 credits
    Through a series of developmental assignments with a conceptual emphasis and by using acquired knowledge from previous semesters, students are encouraged to explore forms that reveal the inherent physical qualities and potential image-making possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven and mixed-media fabric techniques are used as appropriate, depending on the student’s interest in the development of a diverse range of two-dimensional constructions, sculptural forms, costume, etc.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRFB*211, CRFB*212, or CRFB*222

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRFB 322 - Advanced Textile Design

    1.5 credits
    This course uses the computer in the study of woven textile design. An introduction to fabric structures from simple, plain and rib weaves, through twills, satins, waffle weaves, double-cloth, composite structures, and color effects. Students learn the language of cloth through the incremental development of structures, first making notation of those structures by hand on point paper, and then using various computer software programs to develop a wide range of fabric structures. At least one structure is realized through weaving on a 32-harness handweaving computer loom.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRFB*211, CRFB*212, or CRFB*222

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    GRFB 311 - Advanced Fibers Mixed Media

    3 credits
    Through a series of developmental assignments with a conceptual emphasis and by using acquired knowledge from previous semesters, students are encouraged to explore forms that reveal the inherent physical qualities and potential image-making possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven and mixed-media fabric techniques are used as appropriate, depending on the student’s interest in the development of a diverse range of two-dimensional constructions, sculptural forms, costume, etc.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRFB 312 - Advanced Fibers Mixed Media

    3 credits
    Through a series of developmental assignments with a conceptual emphasis and by using acquired knowledge from previous semesters, students are encouraged to explore forms that reveal the inherent physical qualities and potential image-making possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven and mixed-media fabric techniques are used as appropriate, depending on the student’s interest in the development of a diverse range of two-dimensional constructions, sculptural forms, costume, etc.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRFB 322 - Advanced Textile Design

    1.5 credits
    This course uses the computer in the study of woven textile design. An introduction to fabric structures from simple, plain and rib weaves, through twills, satins, waffle weaves, double-cloth, composite structures, and color effects. Students learn the language of cloth through the incremental development of structures, first making notation of those structures by hand on point paper, and then using various computer software programs to develop a wide range of fabric structures. At least one structure is realized through weaving on a 32-harness handweaving computer loom.


Crafts - Glass

  
  •  

    CRGL 211 - Introduction to Glass Blowing

    3 credits
    Through demonstrations, assignments, and tutoring by the instructor, students are guided toward mastery in off-hand blowing. Blowing of well-balanced functional and non-functional forms is emphasized. Topics covered include the use of color in glass, two- and three-dimensional surface treatment, the relationship between volume and skin of forms, blowing into molds, and working in a variety of scales. The aesthetics of contemporary and historical glass are investigated as they relate to the student’s work.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 212 - Introduction to Glass Blowing

    3 credits
    Through demonstrations, assignments, and tutoring by the instructor, students are guided toward mastery in off-hand blowing. Blowing of well-balanced functional and non-functional forms is emphasized. Topics covered include the use of color in glass, two- and three-dimensional surface treatment, the relationship between volume and skin of forms, blowing into molds, and working in a variety of scales. The aesthetics of contemporary and historical glass are investigated as they relate to the student’s work.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 221 - Stained Glass

    3 credits
    Students work with transparent and opaque glass sheet to produce both two- and three-dimensional artwork. Techniques include glass cutting and grinding, use of caming and copper foil, soldering, enameling, sandblasting and carving, and kiln-firing. Typical projects include stained glass windows or panels, containers, and shallow bowls.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 222 - Glass: Material, Meaning and Metaphor

    3 credits
    “In this class, students will explore the plasticity, malleability and responsiveness of hot glass. Hollow and solid-forming techniques will be introduced in the hot shop; construction considerations of larger, non-functional glass assemblies will be introduced and refined; non-traditional combinations of glass with common metals and other materials will be covered. These exercises will result in a series of site-specific installations of both individual and group design. Students will be challenged to expand their sense of scale, to explore unconventional display alternatives, and to develop their resourcefulness in accommodating the demands of installing glasswork outside the gallery setting.”

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 223 - Glassblowing: Color and Glass

    3 credits
    This class will focus on the use of color in both functional and sculptural glasswork. Color chemistry, the history of color development, and trends in color use in contemporary glass production will be studied. The practices of creating component parts and of assembling complex, technically-sound and chemically-stable glass objects will take place in the glass hot shop, with finishing work done in the coldworking studio. Topics to be covered will include: compatibility testing and appraisal, cane-pulling techniques for both latitudinal and longitudinal caning design, proper application of cane in hot glass work, color overlay techniques, Incalmo, or fused bubble techniques, Swedish overlay, Ariel overlay, and fire-polishing techniques.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 224 - Glass in the Narrative Mode

    3 credits
    This class will introduce students to the wide range of glass applications outside the hot shop. ‘Warm’ glass techniques, such as fusing and slumping, will allow students to develop their own personal iconography in refined methods of combining glass and imagery through the manipulation of flat and frit glasses, working with bench torches to produce figurative or abstract glass elements, using cold-assembly techniques including UV cements and epoxies; sand-blasting and etching design approaches; kiln-casting of both free-standing glass work and elements to be combined into larger, more complex installations, engraving and enameling techniques, taking advantage of the transparent ‘canvas’ provided by glass; and investigating new technical and creative options for experimental, potentially transgressive stained glasswork.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 225 - Glassblowing: Form and Function

    3 credits
    This class will focus on traditional glass-blowing techniques. While a great emphasis will be placed on the production of vessels based on historical precedent, students will be also encouraged to use traditional craft to create non-traditional artworks. Through rigorous skill-building exercises in class and during individual practice time, students new to glassblowing will develop their hands and eyes. Students with previous glass experience will take their existing glassblowing skills to a new level of refinement. All students will use historic vessels as both a technical starting point and a springboard for creating glass components for art works. Class time will consist of short slide lectures, group discussions, hot shop demonstrations, and exercises.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRGL 311 - Advanced Glass

    3 credits
    Glass is considered as an expressive medium, and development toward a personal style is encouraged. Students work with hot glass in advanced offhand work, blowing into molds, casting, and enameling, as well as advanced stained glass work and incorporation of blown and cast pieces into two- and three-dimensional structures.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRGL*211, CRGL*212, or CRGL*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.


Crafts - Metals

  
  •  

    CRCM 211 - Introduction to Throwing

    3 credits
    Beginning studio work using the throwing process and related glazing and firing techniques. Problems are given with an emphasis on developing each student’s potential for personal expression and artistic invention.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 212 - Introduction to Throwing

    3 credits
    Beginning studio work using the throwing process and related glazing and firing techniques. Problems are given with an emphasis on developing each student’s potential for personal expression and artistic invention.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 213 - Introduction to Handbuilding

    3 credits
    Beginning studio work with clay using the handbuilding processes of slab, coil pinch, and pressing form molds, plus related glazing and firing techniques. Problems given emphasize developing each student’s potential for personal expression and artistic invention.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 214 - Introduction to Handbuilding

    3 credits
    Beginning studio work with clay using the handbuilding processes of slab, coil pinch, and pressing form molds, plus related glazing and firing techniques. Problems given emphasize developing each student’s potential for personal expression and artistic invention.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 220 - Ceramics

    1.5 credits
    Through lecture and demonstration, students learn basic skills such as handbuilding, throwing, and press molding with an introduction to loading and firing kilns. Mixing clay, slips, and glazes is also being covered. Graduate students may register for this course under GRCR 660.

  
  •  

    CRCM 221 - Introduction to Molding & Casting

    3 credits
    A course in model making, moldmaking, and casting techniques, using plaster and synthetic compounds. Emphasis is on developing proficiency in slip casting for use in the artist’s studio and in industry for serial production.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 222 - Plaster Workshop

    1.5 credits
    An introductory course in model making, moldmaking, and casting techniques, using plaster and synthetic compounds. This course emphasizes the usefulness of these media to designers and artists.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 223 - Ceramic Technology

    1.5 credits
    A lecture and laboratory course designed to investigate basic clay and glaze materials. Students gain an intuitive understanding of ceramic materials, their practical and aesthetic properties, and develop a series of personal glazes. The nature of clays and the relationship among clay bodies, slips, sigillatas, and glazes is also explored.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 224 - Large Scale Handbuilding

    1.5 credits
    The fundamentals of large-scale handbuilding in clay in two specific areas: a) building a three-dimensional form, using proper clay bodies, building interior support systems, building and drying methods for large work, and moving, loading, and firing techniques; b) covering large areas with smaller parts and exploring fitting and interlocking systems of wall relief or free-standing form. Problems are given with an emphasis on developing potential for personal expression and artistic invention.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 311 - Advanced Throwing

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration on the wheel. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, serial production, the table, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness with clay on the wheel. Senior Craft majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites CRCM*212 and CRCM*211

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 312 - Advanced Throwing

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration on the wheel. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, serial production, the table, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness with clay on the wheel. Senior Craft majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites CRCM*212 and CRCM*211

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 313 - Advanced Ceramics

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, production, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRCM*211, CRCM*212, CRCM*213, or CRCM*214

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRCM 314 - Advanced Ceramics

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, production, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRCM*211, CRCM*212, CRCM*213, or CRCM*214

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 211 - Introduction to Jewelry

    3 credits
    An exploration of notions of jewelry and body adornment as a means of personal expression. Projects range from precious jewelry making to adornment that extends into performance. Basic goldsmithing skills are taught as essential, while three-dimensional sketching and experimentation in mixed media are encouraged. Successful integration of design, material, and process is the goal. Projects provide students with broad exposure to the many possibilities inherent in jewelry and ornament as related to the human form.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 212 - Introduction to Jewelry

    3 credits
    An exploration of notions of jewelry and body adornment as a means of personal expression. Projects range from precious jewelry making to adornment that extends into performance. Basic goldsmithing skills are taught as essential, while three-dimensional sketching and experimentation in mixed media are encouraged. Successful integration of design, material, and process is the goal. Projects provide students with broad exposure to the many possibilities inherent in jewelry and ornament as related to the human form.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 221 - Introduction to Metalsmithing

    3 credits
    Metal is an extremely versatile material; though hard and durable, it is quite malleable and easily worked. This course covers direct working of metal. Sheet, wire, bar, and rod are given form by hammering, seaming, and bending, etc. The majority of work is done in bronze, brass, and copper, though steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and precious metals may be used, as well. Contemporary issues addressed include the object as sculpture, process as a source material, the importance of surface and detail, and functional objects made by artists.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 223 - Jewelry Rendering and Design

    3 credits
    Students explore two-dimensional pencil and gouache techniques effective in creating the illusion of finished pieces of jewelry. Emphasis is on the skill development necessary to communicate and evaluate ideas prior to making. Presentation and development of a portfolio are an integral part of the course. Formerly CR 243

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 225 - Enameling

    3 credits
    Enameling is the art of firing colored glass onto metal. The transparent, opaque, and opalescent enamel colors are layered to produce richness, detail, depth, and brilliance in this durable and painterly medium. Traditional techniques such as cloisonn?, grisaille, Limoges, basse taille, plique-a-jour, and champlev?, as well as contemporary and experimental processes are explored. Once they have gained a facility with the medium, students produce jewelry or small jewel-like paintings.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 226 - Introduction to Metal Casting

    3 credits
    Wax working for jewelry and small-scale sculpture, rubber molding processes, and lost wax/centrifugal casting of bronze and (optional) sterling silver and karat golds. Extensive technical information for students who are design-oriented. Assignments allow projects in all formats (design, one-of-a-kind jewelry, fine art, etc.) and students are encouraged to use techniques innovatively and expressively. Students taking the course a second time choose one aspect of the course (wax carving, wax modeling, wax impressions, vulcanized rubber molding, etc.) and produce a small body of work investigating that aspect in depth. Procedures for sending out work to professional contract casters are also covered.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 227 - Introduction to Electroforming

    3 credits
    Electroforming is the process of electrically depositing (plating) metal onto a non-metallic surface or object. Metal may be built up on non-porous materials such as wax, plastic, Styrofoam, glass, stone, etc. Wax or foam may be removed from electroformed objects to leave a strong, lightweight, self-supporting metal shell. Students work in electroformed copper; assignments are structured to allow students to work in accustomed formats and/or combine electroforming with other materials or processes.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 228 - Metal Furniture

    3 credits
    This course questions our cultural assumptions about furniture. Are common furniture forms dictated by functional requirements or arbitrary choices that have become traditional? Metal (steel, aluminum, bronze) is used for its strength and versatility; other materials are combined with metal according to student ideas and interests. Techniques include bending/forming of rod, tube and plate, oxyacetylene welding, brazing, mechanical fasteners/tap and die, riveting, and light blacksmithing. Typical student projects include small tables, lamps, chairs, outdoor/public furnishings, and experimental forms.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 229 - Small Scale Steelworking

    3 credits
    This course covers light blacksmithing, thin-sheet welding, and other techniques suitable for working steel at tabletop size. Aluminum and other metals may also be used where appropriate. The focus is on the possibilities of metal for the contemporary craftsperson. Contemporary issues include the functional object, the decorative impulse, process as a source of inspiration, and the importance of surface detail.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 311 - Advanced Jewelry/Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in jewelry concepts and techniques. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness and understanding of jewelry as a component of our culture, aid the student in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. More experienced students are encouraged to focus on one specialized area of the jewelry field. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Craft Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRMT*211, CRMT*212, or CRMT*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 312 - Adv. Jewelry/Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in jewelry concepts and techniques. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness and understanding of jewelry as a component of our culture, aid the student in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. More experienced students are encouraged to focus on one specialized area of the jewelry field. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Craft Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRMT*211, CRMT*212, or CRMT*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 321 - Advanced Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in metalsmithing skills. Technical demonstrations and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness of metal’s possibilities, increase metalworking skill, aid in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRMT*211, CRMT*212, or CRMT*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRMT 322 - Advanced Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in metalsmithing skills. Technical demonstrations and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness of metal’s possibilities, increase metalworking skill, aid in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRMT*211, CRMT*212, or CRMT*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    GRMT 311 - Advanced Jewelry/Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in jewelry concepts and techniques. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness and understanding of jewelry as a component of our culture, aid the student in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. More experienced students are encouraged to focus on one specialized area of the jewelry field. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Craft Projects III.

  
  •  

    GRMT 312 - Adv. Jewelry/Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in jewelry concepts and techniques. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness and understanding of jewelry as a component of our culture, aid the student in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. More experienced students are encouraged to focus on one specialized area of the jewelry field. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Craft Projects III.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRMT 321 - Advanced Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in metalsmithing skills. Technical demonstrations and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness of metal’s possibilities, increase metalworking skill, aid in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites Take 6 credits from: CRMT*211, CRMT*212, or CRMT*221

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRMT 322 - Advanced Metals

    3 credits
    Builds upon a basic grounding in metalsmithing skills. Technical demonstrations and conceptual projects vary from year to year so that students retaking the course will not find it redundant. The goals of the course are to increase awareness of metal’s possibilities, increase metalworking skill, aid in the development of a personal aesthetic, and develop thinking and problem-solving abilities. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.


Crafts - Wood

  
  •  

    CRWD 211 - Introduction to Woodworking

    3 credits
    Introduction to basic woodworking skills and processes, including sharpening and setting up hand tools and machinery, theory of solid wood joinery, and construction. In addition to building technical skills, emphasis is on contemporary and historical furniture design issues.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 212 - Introduction to Woodworking

    3 credits
    Introduction to basic woodworking skills and processes, including sharpening and setting up hand tools and machinery, theory of solid wood joinery, and construction. In addition to building technical skills, emphasis is on contemporary and historical furniture design issues. Prerequisites & Notes: Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 221 - Introduction to Furniture

    3 credits
    This course presents a series of design problems emphasizing exploration of ideas through drawing and model making. Historic and contemporary examples are studied. Fundamental joinery techniques are covered, but the emphasis is on design exploration, imagination, and inventiveness. Students provide their own materials and some hand tools.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 223 - Wood Carving

    1.5 credits
    An introductory course focused on the development of technical skills. A survey of historical and contemporary precedents exposes the student to the potential wood carving has as a vehicle for artistic expression. The class covers the selection, use, and sharpening of tools, materials and choice of woods, lamination and joinery used for carving, finishing techniques, and letter carving. Students provide their own carving tools.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 224 - Low-Tech Furniture

    3 credits
    Using materials gathered from both nature and the urban environment, students make chairs, tables and other functional objects. Inspired by the design inherent in natural materials, branches and twigs, artifacts, and found objects, the class conceives and executes a series of projects. Basic, non-technical construction methods and simple hand tools are stressed.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 225 - Making and Playing: Improvisational Musical Instruments

    3 credits
    The course will serve as an introduction to essential principals of sound mechanics and simple musical instrument design and building. Using essential materials and basic woodworking processes, these principals will be investigated in a manner that encourages spontaneity, critical awareness, and collaboration in design, making, and use. The goal is an integration of personal studio practice with the social environment of music and sound. The teaching method will combine lectures covering historical, cultural, and technical information with demonstrations of tool and material use. The importance of temporal and haptic experience in developing an appropriate level of workmanship will be stressed. Much student/faculty contact will be one on one and students will be expected to actively share critical input with each other. Students will learn to make simple musical instruments/sound objects that demonstrate the several basics means of sound production. A series of didactic demonstrations of mechanics, material possibilities, and techniques will be accompanied by presentations of ethnographic instruments, music, and social environments. Three projects of increasing complexity will ask for responses to this introductory material. Students will research and develop concept proposals for each assignment, working initially “”solo”” and later within the context of “”duets”” and “”ensembles.”” Within these varied contexts designs will be tested and implemented refining structure, material use, acoustic response, function relative to the body, and aesthetic content.

  
  •  

    CRWD 311 - Advanced Wood

    3 credits
    Covers tools, joinery, methods, and materials. Content progresses with increasing complexity, involving machining, hand tools, finishing, and surface treatments. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites CRWD*211 and CRWD*212

    Priority enrollment to Crafts & Multidisciplinary majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 321 - Advanced Furniture

    3 credits
    Continuation of CRWD 223 (Introduction to Furniture) involving more complex design projects, combinations of objects, and advanced model making and finishing techniques. Emphasis on imagination, inventiveness, and depth of content. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites CRWD*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    CRWD 322 - Advanced Furniture

    3 credits
    Continuation of CRWD 223 (Introduction to Furniture) involving more complex design projects, combinations of objects, and advanced model making and finishing techniques. Emphasis on imagination, inventiveness, and depth of content. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Prerequisites CRWD*221

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
  •  

    GRWD 311 - Advanced Wood

    3 credits
    Covers tools, joinery, methods, and materials. Content progresses with increasing complexity, involving machining, hand tools, finishing, and surface treatments. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRWD 321 - Advanced Furniture

    3 credits
    Continuation of CRWD 223 (Introduction to Furniture) involving more complex design projects, combinations of objects, and advanced model making and finishing techniques. Emphasis on imagination, inventiveness, and depth of content. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

  
  •  

    GRWD 322 - Advanced Furniture

    3 credits
    Continuation of CRWD 223 (Introduction to Furniture) involving more complex design projects, combinations of objects, and advanced model making and finishing techniques. Emphasis on imagination, inventiveness, and depth of content. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.


Dance

  
  •  

    DACP 160 - Rhythm and Dynamics in Dance

    1 credit
    Provides an understanding and experience of rhythm that enables students to hear, feel, count, and notate rhythmic structures and enhance sensibility and creativity.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 164 - Improvisation I

    1 credit
    This course comprises breathing and centering warm-ups, isolation exercises, and technical improvisation on movement qualities, including swinging, gliding, falling, rising, slow motion. Students learn to develop choreographic ideas through group improvisational structures.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 260 - Music for Dance Composition

    1 credit
    An exploration of various kinds of musical materials and literature, from Gregorian chant to New Music, relating the selection of music to the creation of dance composition. Improvisation utilizing different sounds and instruments.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 261 - Dance Composition: Solo Forms

    1 credit
    The course integrates the improvisational skills acquired earlier in Improvisation, and Music for Composition. Designed to provide the beginning choreographer with the tools needed to structure a dance composition in solo and duet forms.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 262 - Open Critique

    1 credit
    This course is designed for informal showings and feedback for choreographic works. Students have the opportunity to hear different and intersecting points of view about what motivates choreographers and their work.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACP 263 - Improvisation II

    1 credit
    Individual improvisations are performed on themes with objects in restricted or altered spaces and times. Various structures are used for group improvisation. Free improvisation with live music is stressed. Required of students majoring in Modern Dance.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 300 - Special Topics

    1 credit
    This topic will change by semester according to the expertise of the faculty and visiting artists and leaves room in the curriculum for emerging forms.

  
  •  

    DACP 361 - Dance Composition: Duets

    1 credit
    Continuation of DACR 261. Problem-solving and analysis of materials through individual projects. Special emphasis on choreography for duets.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 362 - Dance Composition: Group Forms

    1 credit
    Continuation of DACR 261. Problem-solving and analysis of materials through individual projects. Special emphasis on group choreography.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 380 - Elements of Performing

    1 credit
    Analyzes the qualities of dance technique that serve the ultimate goal of performance as an artist. Students work with the elements of the art of dance performance and discover how inner focus, motivation, dynamics, muscle intensity, rhythmic timing, breathing, and movement texture are the essentials.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 461 - Advanced Dance Composition

    1 credit
    Continuation of DACR 361 & 362. Senior elective course to assist students in preparation of their Senior concerts.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACP 463 - Contact Improvisation

    1 credit
    Emphasizes the development of tools and skills necessary for realizing individual professional goals, vehicles and processes for change in the various fields of dance within our society. This course develops an awareness of managing life and work as a professional in dance. Topics include basic business principles as well as career self-management and an overview of career opportunities. Guest speakers include faculty and staff from within the University as well as experts from the field.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 101 - Tap Dance I

    1 credit
    Basic vocabulary of tap and development of rhythmically accurate footwork and accompanying body movements.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 102 - Tap Dance II

    1 credit
    Basic vocabulary of tap and development of rhythmically accurate footwork and accompanying body movements.

    Prerequisites DACR*101

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 111 - Ballet I

    2 credits
    Fundamentals of ballet technique including barre and center floor work. The course serves to introduce and develop basic ballet technique and vocabulary. Body placement and alignment is stressed through an understanding and application of these basics. Continuous advancement and development is provided from beginning to advanced levels throughout this four-semester sequence (Ballet I-IV).

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 112 - Ballet II

    2 credits
    Fundamentals of ballet technique including barre and center floor work. The course serves to introduce and develop basic ballet technique and vocabulary. Body placement and alignment is stressed through an understanding and application of these basics. Continuous advancement and development is provided from beginning to advanced levels throughout this four-semester sequence (Ballet I-IV).

    Prerequisites DACR*111

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 121 - Jazz Dance I

    1 credit
    A presentation of styles designed to broaden knowledge and technique of concert and theater jazz dance. Classes employ floor stretches and center barre warm-up procedures. Movement patterns emphasize simultaneous coordination of multiple rhythm patterns in different parts of the body. Combinations advance from simple to complex throughout this four-semester sequence (Jazz Dance I-IV).

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 122 - Jazz Dance II

    1 credit
    A presentation of styles designed to broaden knowledge and technique of concert and theater jazz dance. Classes employ floor stretches and center barre warm-up procedures. Movement patterns emphasize simultaneous coordination of multiple rhythm patterns in different parts of the body. Combinations advance from simple to complex throughout this four-semester sequence (Jazz Dance I-IV).

    Prerequisites DACR*121

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 131 - Modern Dance I

    2 credits
    Basic technique of modern dance for the development of skills, intellectual understanding, kinetic perception, and maximum versatility. Includes barre work, center floor, isolation, falls and recovery, and contractions and release. Part of two-year sequence (Modern Dance IIV). Required of all Dance majors.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 132 - Modern Dance II

    2 credits
    Basic technique of modern dance for the development of skills, intellectual understanding, kinetic perception, and maximum versatility. Includes barre work, center floor, isolation, falls and recovery, and contractions and release. Part of two-year sequence (Modern Dance I-IV). Required of all Dance majors.

    Prerequisites DACR*131

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 150 - Contemporary Art Practices

    3 credits
    In this course, the ever-expanding field of contemporary art will be explored to include dance and performance through the lens of practice. Students will learn to look for and recognize shared aesthetic values and relationship within and across varying disciplines. How can we think about practice as the place and the space for working through an idea? What are the relationships of practice to the studio? What are the relationships between practice, the studio and process for an artist working today? How do these varied practices and processes contribute to conversations about contemporary art and performance today? How can practice become a “meeting ground” for discussion across varying disciplines? Students will immerse themselves in screenings of video work and seek out as many pertinent performances/exhibitions as possible throughout the course. We will also read selected texts & blogs. Class sessions will include visiting artists and speakers who help deepen and bring.

  
  •  

    DACR 151 - Dance History I

    3 credits
    The study of the interaction between dance and the society in which it develops, emphasizing the changing role and nature of dance. Course deals with dance from the Renaissance through Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe. Dance History II surveys dance from pre-World War II to the present.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 152 - Dance History II

    3 credits
    The study of the interaction between dance and the society in which it develops, emphasizing the changing role and nature of dance. Course deals with dance from the Renaissance through Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe. Dance History II surveys dance from pre-World War II to the present.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 153 - Fundamentals of Dance I

    1 credit
    Basic aesthetic considerations of the dance art form. The first semester examines the nature and forms of dance, dance in relation to other arts, and its language and literature. It continues with the care of the dancer’s body, injury prevention, nutrition, and dieting.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 154 - Fundamentals of Dance II

    1 credit
    A continuation of DACR 153 with additional consideration of the principles of Effort Shape (a system of movement analysis) and choreography.

    Prerequisites DACR*153

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 155 - Dance Ethnology

    1 credit
    A survey of the broad perspectives of dance as an expression of culture through investigation of Western and non-Western dance forms.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 160 - Rhythm and Dynamics in Dance

    1 credit
    Provides an understanding and experience of rhythm that enables students to hear, feel, count, and notate rhythmic structures and enhance sensibility and creativity.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 163 - Eurythmics

    1 credit
    A beginning course in dance theory and composition that explores the development of rhythm perception through movement improvisation. Students receive weekly movement assignments directed toward specific rhythm and dance problems.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 164 - Improvisation I

    1 credit
    This course comprises breathing and centering warm-ups, isolation exercises, and technical improvisation on movement qualities, including swinging, gliding, falling, rising, slow motion. Students learn to develop choreographic ideas through group improvisational structures.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 171 - Nutrition

    1 credit
    The study of nutrition and its application to food selection, with special emphasis on the nutritional needs of the dancer.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 172 - Dance Therapy

    1 credit
    An examination of the use of dance movements as therapeutic tools in working with the physically and mentally handicapped.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only. Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits).

  
  •  

    DACR 173 - Kinesiology

    1 credit
    A study of the mechanics of the body in motion based upon the background provided in Anatomy for Dancers. Muscular and biomechanical aspects are presented, with a stress on overuse syndrome and prevention of dance injuries.

    Priority enrollment to majors in the School of Dance.

  
  •  

    DACR 175 - Body Pathways I

    1 credit
    Body Pathways is a core course in the first year Foundation Series designed to introduce students to the following: conditioning & assessment; awareness for alignment, placement and strength; experiential anatomy; and varying somatic practices for sustaining the body in dance. This course provides students with ongoing and consistent body assessment tools that will keep them dancing in a healthier, stronger way throughout their careers in dance. The course takes the alongside detailed explanation of body mechanics informed by somatic principles.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 176 - Body Pathways II

    1 credit
    Body Pathways is a core course in the first year Foundation Series designed to introduce students to the following: conditioning & assessment; awareness for alignment, placement and strength; experiential anatomy; and varying somatic practices for sustaining the body in dance. This course provides students with ongoing and consistent body assessment tools that will keep them dancing in a healthier, stronger way throughout their careers in dance. The course takes the alongside detailed explanation of body mechanics informed by somatic principles.

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 211 - Studio Practice: Ballet III

    2 credits
    Continuation of DACR 111 & 112.

    Prerequisites DACR*112

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 212 - Studio Practice: Ballet IV

    2 credits
    Continuation of DACR 111 & 112.

    Prerequisites DACR*211

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

  
  •  

    DACR 221 - Studio Practice: Jazz Dance III

    1 credit
    Continuation of DACR 121 & 122.

    Prerequisites DACR*122

    Open to majors in the School of Dance only.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 15