Aug 18, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOGUE]

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Fine Arts - Painting & Drawing

  
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    FAPT 212 - Drawing Studies

    1.5 credits
    A studio course advancing the objectives of Drawing: Form/Space. Emphasis is on two essential concerns: process and purpose. Students are expected to carry out sustained involvement in specific projects focused on method and content. Studio practices include both open-ended invention and closed-system approaches. This kind of sustained focus on a variety of techniques and themes culminates in a final term project.

    Prerequisites FNDP*151 and FNDP*161

  
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    FAPT 213 - Figure Drawing

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students work from the clothed and nude model and are introduced to the range of approaches relevant to the act of direct observation. This course encourages the students to clarify what they are looking for when they are drawing the human body. Proportion, anatomy, psychology, posture, kinetics, weight, volume, tactility, and environment are a few of the considerations that have an impact on the diverse ways in which figure drawings can be made.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 214 - Abstract Drawing

    3 credits
    An assignment-critique format, which examines the nature of abstraction in the context of drawing disciplines. Options in media, tools, methods, and formats are considered in relation to the purposes of a given project. In general, abstraction calls for an appreciation of the intrinsic properties of the materials used in a work, the formal characteristics of toolmarkings, and the significance of pictorial structures.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 215 - Figure Composition

    1.5 - 3 credits
    A drawing course emphasizing the development of images using multiple figure arrangements. Assignments are designed to foster awareness of the significance of poses and groupings relative to formal design virtues, narrative, and symbolism.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 221 - Painting Studio

    1.5 credits
    A general study of painting subjects, such as the still life, landscape, the city, the human figure, and its environs. This course usually includes a subtitle, such as Figure in the Landscape, which defines the thematic basis for the studio projects.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111 and FNDP*121

  
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    FAPT 222 - Watercolor

    1.5 credits
    A course in which the preferred medium is transparent watercolor, the particular characteristics of which are explored. Both perceptual and non-perceptual approaches are introduced.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 227 - Figure Painting

    3 credits
    Painting projects are designed to develop awareness of the many issues to be considered in creating forms that represent the human being. Working from the live models as well as from other visual sources, including photography and fine-art masterworks, students investigate conceptual and stylistic possibilities in depicting the human figure. Concerns for gesture, weight, color, proportion, scale, apparel, portraiture, space and light, composition, and narration can all be circumstances in which the human figure is the center of interest.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 233 - Landscape Painting

    3 credits
    Projects examine possible ways of seeing and interpreting the traditional components of the landscape: city, country, land, water, sky, light, and atmosphere. Procedures can include working from on-site experience, memory, and other research information.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 234 - Pictorial Elements

    1.5 credits
    Projects assignments will explore the potential of form-making through focused study of the abstract elements of line, shape, color, tone, and texture.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 235 - Earthspace

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course explores the dynamic forces of nature and their impact on the Earth, including weather activity such as wind, rain, lightning, formation of clouds, tornados, hurricanes, tidal waves, and other dramatic events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mudslides, blizzards, dust storms, drought, erosion. Projects are undertaken through imagination, experimentation, as well as through use of both anecdotal and scientific resources and are developed by means of both drawing and painting tools and media.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

  
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    FAPT 237 - Representational Painting

    3 credits
    A studio course addressing the traditional and contemporary concepts and approaches to representational images. Emphasis is placed on the relation between content and form. Exploration in color, space, texture, shape, composition, and style are evaluated in the context of intention, aspects of recognition, and precedent. Paintings are generated out of direct observation of nature and human models as well as from the student’s own resources. Projects may focus on contemporary prototypes (paintings since 1945), specific domains such as American Portraiture, or paradigms from the entire lineage of East/West traditions of representational art.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 238 - Abstract Painting

    3 credits
    The genesis of abstraction can be nature, an idea, or an emotion. An abstract painting is one in which the pictorial form is primarily a product of invention and imagination. It may or may not reflect a reality outside itself. Assignments investigate a range of concepts, sources, and procedures.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 241 - Mixed Media

    3 credits
    A diversity of drawing and painting media and methods, including collage and construction, are explored, discovered, invented, and intermixed in order to develop a versatile repertoire of studio skills.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

  
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    FAPT 243 - Collage: The Constructed Image

    3 credits
    Studio projects are assigned that promote the development of images through the aggregation of fragments. Collage as a principle of construction examines compositional notions of unity and harmony and can involve the interaction of diverse and incongruous materials, methods, styles, and/or images.

    Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman year (15 credits).

  
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    FAPT 301 - Junior Painting

    3 credits
    Students maintain individual spaces in the Junior Studio where they can develop a more professional working routine. They are expected to show increasing personal initiative and direction. Regular critiques on both an individual and group basis connect the student to the values of the past and the present, stimulate interest in the major questions of our time, and provide resources for progress. This course embraces a plurality of ideas about painting and, linked with the goals of FACR 301, advocates a spirit of experimentation and research.

    Prerequisites FAPT*201

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing and Multidisciplinary majors.

  
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    FAPT 302 - Junior Painting

    3 credits
    Continuation of FAPT 301.

    Prerequisites FAPT*201, FAPT*202, or equivalent

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing and Multidisciplinary majors.

  
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    FAPT 303 - Color Studies

    1.5 credits
    Studio group projects and independent projects consider the purposes and effects of color organization, color perception, and color theory. Color is approached as emotive, symbolic, descriptive, and structural.

    Prerequisites FAPT*202

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing majors.

  
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    FAPT 306 - Junior Seminar

    1.5 credits
    A discussion format aimed at investigating and understanding the content of, the motivations for, and the influences on contemporary painting. Emphasis is on exploring the theories, questions, and issues that create the intellectual content for contemporary artists. Students are given reading assignments as preparation for the seminar dialogue. Selected texts include artists’ documents, critical writings, and classic essays covering such areas as aesthetic principles, political and cultural realities, and psychological perspectives. Class sessions emphasize group discussions based on viewing slides, PowerPoint presentations and other appropriate visual material, reading assignments, and various written and oral forms of student presentations.

    Prerequisites FAPT*202

    Open to Painting/Drawing majors only.

  
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    FAPT 307 - Junior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    This course will be a continuation of information and experiences encountered in FAPT 211: Drawing Form and Space and the introduction of more sophisticated concepts in pictorial art. Drawing will be considered as a preparatory form-making act in the painting process and as expression in its own right.

    Prerequisites FAPT*211, FAPT*212, FAPR*205, or equivalent

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing majors.

  
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    FAPT 308 - Junior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    This course will be a continuation of information and experiences encountered in FAPT 211: Drawing Form and Space and the introduction of more sophisticated concepts in pictorial art. Drawing will be considered as a preparatory form-making act in the painting process and as expression in its own right.

    Prerequisites FAPT*211, FAPT*212, FAPR*205, or equivalent

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing majors.

  
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    FAPT 401 - Senior Painting

    3 - 4.5 credits
    Critical commentary centers on four areas of concern: 1. The character of the work: its formal properties, its physical properties, aspects of intelligibility. 2. Intention - the investigation of motives and choices. 3. Context: ways that a work relates to a larger body of work, both generic and stylistic. 4. Quality: approaches to questions of value. There are individual critiques each week and periodic group critiques, sometimes involving the participation of a visiting artist.

    Prerequisites FAPT*302

    Priority enrollment to Painting/Drawing and Multidisciplinary majors.

  
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    FAPT 402 - Senior Painting

    6 credits
    The Painting major formulates a senior thesis project. Working with senior faculty who read and critique early drafts, the student develops a formal written thesis and a body of artwork to be presented at the end of the term to a review panel. This panel is comprised of Studio faculty, Liberal Arts faculty, and student peers.

    Prerequisites FAPT*302

    Open to Painting/Drawing majors only.

  
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    FAPT 403 - Drawing References

    1.5 credits
    Advanced drawing projects focus on the relation between a given work and its references and resources. Emphasis is on understanding the nature of references or resource material and the manner in which references or resources influence the outcome of a work. This studio/critique course aims at enhancing students’ ability to connect their personal and subjective interests to the larger context of nature, history, and culture.

    Prerequisites FAPT*307 FAPT*308 FAPR*301 or FASC*301

  
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    FAPT 404 - Drawing References

    1.5 credits
    Continuation of FAPT 403.

    Prerequisites FAPT*307 FAPT*308 FAPR*301 or FASC*301

  
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    FAPT 405 - Senior Seminar

    1.5 credits
    This seminar focuses on pictorial art and its role in culture, both in historic and contemporary contexts. Issues surrounding the various purposes of art and how the culture deals with artists will be explored. Emphasis is placed on student participation.

  
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    FAPT 411 - Senior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    Advanced drawing, specialized projects.

    Prerequisites FAPT*304

  
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    FAPT 421 - Advanced Painting Projects

    1.5 credits
    Painting assignments deal with the implications of the formats, processes and pictorial structures of painting. Students are expected to give individualized responses to these issues and convene in group critiques to discuss the results.

    Prerequisites FAPT*302

    Open to Painting/Drawing majors only.

  
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    FAPT 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 9 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.


Fine Arts - Printmaking

  
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    FAPR 125 - Freshman Non-Toxic Printmaking

    1.5 credits
    This is an introductory overview to printmaking processes that use non-toxic methods. This includes intaglio, (using water process photographic plates), drypoint, relief, collograph, monotype, and paper litho. Emphasis on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of various non-toxic process. Students will experience the wide possibilities of expression inherent in printmaking.

  
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    FAPR 141 - Freshman Screenprinting

    1.5 credits
    An introduction and investigation of various stencil methods, based on three primary types of screen stencils, cut paper, blockout/resist, and photo emulsion, using water-based inks on both paper and fabric. Emphasis on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen-printed opaque and transparent colors, and the use of editions in a collaborative class image exchange. Additionally, the various media unique to printmaking are shown and discussed, to introduce the beginning student to the wide possibilities of expression inherent in printmaking.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    FAPR 143 - Freshman Etching

    1.5 credits
    This printmaking course introduces the hands-on process used on metal plates to create images with line, tone, and texture. Color and monochromatic idea development is encouraged in this print medium that is a favorite of historic and contemporary artists. A class portfolio of prints are exchanged by the participants.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    FAPR 201 - Relief/Monotype

    3 credits
    Introduction to the graphic and expressive qualities of woodcut, linoleum, and collograph processes printed in monochrome and color. Monoprinting with direct drawing and painting on Plexiglas and metal plate are also explored.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

    Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits). Priority enrollment to Printmaking, Multidiscip, majors, Fine Arts majors and Book Arts minor.

  
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    FAPR 205 - Concepts/Works on Paper

    3 credits
    Offers an opportunity for idea development, visual perception, and the organization of experience into compositions. Primary emphasis is on developing visual expression, skill in using various materials, and growth of critical evaluative abilities through group discussions and critiques. Contour drawing, collage, Xerox transfer and other experimental drawing and printing techniques are explored. Students are encouraged to combine media.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors. Open to Fine Arts majors only.

  
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    FAPR 206 - Screenprinting Studio

    3 credits
    The graphic qualities of expression in screenprinting are presented through historic and contemporary examples and demonstration of the methods. Various stencil processes from direct-drawn to photographic and computer-generated are explored in water-based opaque and transparent inks. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the qualities of these methods and the development of personal ideas.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking, Multidiscip majors, Fine Arts majors and Book Arts minor.

  
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    FAPR 211 - Relief Printing

    1.5 credits
    This course offers an introduction to the basic relief printing methods of linoleum cut and woodcut. Black and white and color are explored. Both printing by hand and printing on an etching press is introduced. Special emphasis is placed on personal expression.

  
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    FAPR 212 - Screenprinting

    1.5 credits
    Introduction and investigation of stencil methods in screenprinting with water-based inks. Idea development and acquisition of visual skills in expression in color, line, and form through drawn, photographic, or computer-generated stencil processes.

  
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    FAPR 213 - Etching/Monotype

    1.5 credits
    Individual expression with the graphic qualities of etched and directly drawn ideas created on the metal plate by hand or acid etching in color and monochrome. Processes also include printing from drawing and painting directly on Plexiglas and metal plate with oil and water based materials.

  
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    FAPR 214 - Nonsilver Printmaking Process

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students are introduced to the basic techniques of nonsilver by building images in color with layers of brushed-on light-sensitive emulsion. Light-resists can range from photogram objects to drawings and paintings to film or paper negatives. Processes covered are Vandyke brown, cyanotype, and gum bichromate.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors. Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits).

  
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    FAPR 221 - Lithography

    1.5 credits
    This course offers students an introduction to lithographic drawing and printing methods using stone and metal plates. Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas through the medium and explore it with regard to their major field.

  
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    FAPR 231 - Papermaking

    1.5 credits
    Through slide lectures and demonstrations, this studio course introduces students to all aspects of traditional Western and Japanese papermaking techniques including pulp preparation, sheet formation, pressing, and drying sheets. Students learn refined, professional methods as well as explore the creative versatility of pulp. Classes include: casting three-dimensional objects and bowls, building subtle relief images in colored pulp, and painting with pulp. Various fibers explored throughout the semester include garden vegetables and indigenous plants.

  
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    FAPR 233 - Bookbinding Methods

    1.5 credits
    A workshop class familiarizing the student with the characteristics and handling qualities of materials used in various book structures. Structures covered include pamphlet binding, multi-signature books, clamshell boxes, portfolios, accordion structures, and oriental binding. Emphasis is placed upon both the use of conservationally sound materials and the use of these structures as vehicles for the student’s creative expression.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors and minors.

  
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    FAPR 241 - Etching Studio

    3 credits
    The graphic qualities of expression in etching/intaglio are presented through historic and contemporary examples and demonstration of the methods. Handwork on metal plate includes drawn drypoint, etching, and tonal processes. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the qualities of these methods and the development of personal ideas.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking, Multidiscip majors, Fine Arts majors and Book Arts minor.

  
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    FAPR 301 - Printmaking Workshop

    3 credits
    This course concentrates on contemporary printmaking practices. Focus will be on the exploration of a variety of printmaking applications. Students should take at least one area of printmaking and challenge the potential for art making with that medium. Drawings are expected as a way of generating and developing ideas.

    Open to Printmaking majors only.

  
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    FAPR 302 - Printmaking Workshop

    1.5 credits
    An investigation into the combination of previously studied printmaking media including, but not confined to: relief, intaglio, screenprinting, lithography, and photo & digital imaging. Students are encouraged to investigate unorthodox uses of materials and techniques through the creation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional work.

    Prerequisites FAPR*201 and FAPR*204

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors.

  
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    FAPR 303 - Print Study Seminar I

    1.5 credits
    Students meet at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the Print Study room to discuss and study original prints and rare books from the museum collection. Masters of the 15th through the 18th centuries are introduced and researched. Various print processes that parallel the material covered in the course will be researched in the printmaking studios.

    Open to Printmaking majors only. Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    FAPR 304 - Book Arts: Concept and Structure

    3 credits
    An opportunity to explore the integration of type and relief image in unique and editioned book structures. Hands-on experience in dealing with composition (metal) type and computer typesetting is on an intermediate level. Relief printing, photopolymer plates, color reduction printing, and related traditional and contemporary methods of multiple image making are pursued. Special emphasis on development of a personal visual language.

    Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits). Priority enrollment to Printmaking, Multidiscip, majors, Fine Arts majors and Book Arts minor.

  
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    FAPR 305 - Lithography

    3 credits
    All of the basic techniques of drawing, imagemaking and printing skills that are necessary to produce hand-pulled lithographs from stones and plates are taught. An emphasis is placed on visual expression and development of ideas through group discussions and critiques.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking, Multidiscip majors, Fine Arts majors and Book Arts minor.

  
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    FAPR 314 - Advanced Non-Silver

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Opportunity for continued development of images and skills in combinations of non-silver processes. Introduction of palladium printing and the use of the Scitex Image Setter in the Imaging Lab.

    Prerequisites FAPR*214

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors.

  
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    FAPR 321 - Advanced Lithography

    1.5 credits
    Students will further investigate and develop image-making, through lithography. In this course students will be encouraged to use lithography in dynamic and unexpected ways. Students at this advanced level in fine arts should expect to focus attention on concept, content and formal concerns and to research historic and contemporary litho prints and practices. The skills learned will include, large format stone printing, multicolor separation and registration, and offset litho techniques. They will have the opportunity to perfect their technical skills thereby producing printed works of greater scope and complexity consistent with their interests and experience.

    Prerequisites FAPR*305

    Open to Printmaking majors only.

  
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    FAPR 323 - Intro to Offset Lithography

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students are offered a hands-on course that develops skills in image preparation and printing techniques using offset lithography. An emphasis is placed on personal imagery where both hand-drawn and photographic methods of image making are investigated.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors and minors. Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits).

  
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    FAPR 324 - Advanced Offset Lithography

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students have the opportunity for a continued investigation of offset lithography with advanced projects.

    Prerequisites FAPR*323

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors.

  
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    FAPR 325 - Book Arts: Structures

    1.5 credits
    Historical book forms serve as models and as a departure point for innovative new work. Among the new structures presented are accordion bindings and variations, pop-ups, carousel books, tunnel books, and box structures. Students are encouraged to explore new applications and to experiment by combining images and text with book structures. Prior bookbinding experience is suggested. May serve as a follow-up course for FAPR 233. Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors and Book Arts minors.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors and minors.

  
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    FAPR 326 - Advanced Screenprinting

    1.5 credits
    Students will further investigate and develop image-making, through screenprinting. In this course students will be encouraged to use screenprinting in dynamic and unexpected ways. Students at this advanced level in fine arts should expect to focus attention on concept, content, and formal concerns and to research historic and contemporary screenprints and practices. They will have the opportunity to perfect their technical skills thereby producing printed works of greater scope and complexity consistent with their interests and experience.

    Prerequisites FAPR*206

    Open to Printmaking majors only.

  
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    FAPR 327 - Advanced Etching

    1.5 credits
    Students will further investigate and develop image-making, through intaglio printmaking. In this course students will be encouraged to use intaglio in dynamic ways. Students at this advanced level in fine arts should expect to focus attention on concept, content, and formal concerns and to research historic and contemporary intaglio prints and practices. The skills learned will include, relief etching, multicolor separation and registration, stencil techniques, a la poupee, and chine colle. They will have the opportunity to perfect their technical skills thereby producing printed works of greater scope and complexity consistent with their interests and experience.

    Prerequisites FAPR*241

  
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    FAPR 328 - Advanced Relief

    1.5 credits
    Students will further investigate and develop image-making, through relief printmaking. In this course students will be encouraged to use relief in dynamic and unexpected ways. Students at this advanced level in fine arts should expect to focus attention on concept, content, and formal concerns and to research historic and contemporary relief prints and practices. The skills learned will include, large format carving and printing, multicolor separation and registration, and photographic relief techniques. They will have the opportunity to perfect their technical skills thereby producing printed works of greater scope and complexity consistent with their interests and experience.

    Prerequisites FAPR*201

    Open to Printmaking majors only.

  
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    FAPR 336 - Advanced Book Arts: Concepts and Structures

    1.5 credits
    Because Artists’ Books function as an “”alternative space”“, one can examine contemporary, historical, and independent approaches to the printed page and how it represents itself in ways different to painting, sculpture or film. Students will continue to explore the potential of letterpress and other printmaking processes while considering the books structure as an integral part of the process. Emphasis will be on edition work, one of a kind and collaborative book works. Consideration is placed on pace and development of information, in relation to the viewers’ hand. Manipulating word and image in unconventional ways as inventive departures from existing means of describing reality.

    Prerequisites FAPR*304

  
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    FAPR 401 - Printmaking Workshop II

    3 credits
    Students continue to develop their ideas, images, and technique while establishing their direction and personal original expression. The workshop atmosphere permits a comfortable handling of all procedures and printmaking processes. Students are expected to participate in a group exhibition.

    Prerequisites FAPR*305

    Open to Printmaking and Multidisciplinary majors only.

  
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    FAPR 402 - Thesis Workshop

    3 credits
    Offers the student the opportunity to develop a body of work in preparation for portfolio and exhibition presentation. An emphasis is placed on the development of ideas and content in the individual students work, which is supported by a series of individual and group critiques by faculty and visiting artists. The student is expected to participate in group exhibitions as well as a solo exhibition and to present a professional portfolio of work.

    Prerequisites FAPR*201, FAPR*204, and FAPR*305

    Open to Printmaking majors only.

  
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    FAPR 403 - Print Study Seminar II

    1.5 credits
    The historical and conceptual context of prints, portfolios and book arts of the 19th and 20th centuries are studied at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Written and printed expression of the ideas and processes involved are integrated into this course of study.

    Open to Printmaking majors only. Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    FAPR 411 - Digital Printmaking

    3 credits
    This course offers the students an opportunity for continued investigation within the various printmaking processes. Photoshop is introduced with an emphasis on using the computer as an imagemaking tool within the context of printmaking. The emphasis is on the integration of idea and process. Graduate students may register for this course under GRPR 633.

    Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors; Book Arts and Digital Fine Arts minors.

    Restrictions Computer Literacy Required
  
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    FAPR 434 - Book Production

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This advanced course focuses on the development and production of a printed book or portfolio of works: design and formatting of a publication including the investigation of sequence, page design, and binding possibilities; hands-on experience in the preparation of images for press production, pre-press techniques; and assisting the Master Printer in the printing. All work is produced in the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts, the University’s offset lithography facility. Students may choose to collaborate on projects or work independently.

    Open to majors in the College of Art, Media, and Design only. Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    FAPR 481 - Collaborative Printmaking

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students will be involved in the business, technology, and experience of printing limited editions for faculty, other students, or professional artists. During this process they will work with the artist in preparing the idea, then proofing and printing the edition. Advanced students only; they must demonstrate mark-making and editioning abilities.

  
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    FAPR 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.


Fine Arts - Sculpture

  
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    FASC 101 - Freshman Sculpture

    1.5 credits
    An introduction to sculptural thinking and methods using a variety of materials and processes, including modeling and fabrication. Form-making options are undertaken that are especially suited to acquaint beginning students with the diversity of sculptural activity.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Restricted to Undergraduate students only. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    FASC 201 - Sculpture I

    3 credits
    Emphasizes the fundamental and formal aspects of sculpture. Projects are assigned to help the student experience and understand the unique expressive values of mass, space, plane, line, balance, rhythm, scale, movement, and time transformation. This course also serves to introduce the student to a variety of materials and techniques. Assigned projects, group critiques and slide lectures.

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 202 - Sculpture I

    3 credits
    Emphasizes the fundamental and formal aspects of sculpture. Projects are assigned to help the student experience and understand the unique expressive values of mass, space, plane, line, balance, rhythm, scale, movement, and time transformation. This course also serves to introduce the student to a variety of materials and techniques. Assigned projects, group critiques, and slide lectures.

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 203 - Introduction to Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    Modeling from life for the beginner, stressing direct observation, eye-hand coordination, and depth discrimination. Both perceptual and conceptual skills are developed and fundamental studio practices are taught, such as armature construction, clay utilization, and modeling techniques. Works are fired in clay or cast in plaster.

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 211 - Structure of the Figure

    3 credits
    Anatomic and morphological analysis of male and female bodies for artists through a three-dimensional constructional method. Proportions, anatomic structure, surface topology, morphological variation, and the body in movement are covered. Directed toward two-dimensional artists as well as sculptors. The means by which the body’s salient features can be recognized from any viewpoint in any pose is stressed.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 212 - Structure of the Figure

    3 credits
    Focus shifts second semester to important, small body parts specifically, the head/neck, forearm/hand and foot. Life-scale skeletal structures are modeled directly in pigmented wax on which all muscle layers are applied. Lectures include skeletal structure, joint construction and limitations of movement, muscular function and form, and superficial structures. Class is divided into two halves - lecture and studio.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 221 - Introduction to Sculpture Projects

    3 credits
    An open studio oriented toward helping the development of individual initiative. Stress on how ideas are transformed into sculptural statements through aesthetic reasoning and the internal logic of a sculpture’s color, material, and physical construction.

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 222 - Introduction to Sculpture Projects

    3 credits
    An open studio oriented toward helping the development of individual initiative. Stress on how ideas are transformed into sculptural statements through aesthetic reasoning and the internal logic of a sculpture’s color, material, and physical construction.

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 231 - Molding and Casting

    1.5 credits
    Covers processes and techniques utilizing plaster, rubber, plastics, clays, and wax for making hard and flexible molds and for casting sculpture in durable materials. Provides a thorough foundation in foundry practices, including wax preparation, investing, pouring bronze or aluminum, chasing, finishing, and patinating finished metal casts.

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 232 - Molding and Casting

    1.5 credits
    Covers processes & techniques utilizing plaster, rubber, plastics, clays, & wax for making hard & flexible molds & for casting sculpture in durable materials. Provides a thorough foundation in foundry practices, including wax preparation, investing, pouring bronze or aluminum, chasing, finishing, & patinating finished metal casts.

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 300 - Jr. Sculpture I

    3 credits
    This course is designed to help each student begin to understand his own aesthetic proclivities, and to place these within an art historical context. The emotional, intellectual, philosophical, and historical implications of various movements in art history are explored in order to begin to understand their relationship to the personal artistic development of each student within the history of sculpture. An emphasis is placed on the development of ideas and content in the individual student’s work, which is supported by a series of individual and group critiques by faculty and visiting artists. Weekly class meetings will include slide talks related to current assignments, films, discussions, and field trips to exhibitions around the Philadelphia area. This will be followed by personal conferences with the instructor.

    Prerequisites FASC*201 or FASC*202

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 301 - Jr. Sculpture II

    3 credits
    This course is designed to help each student begin to understand his own aesthetic proclivities, and to place these within an art historical context. The emotional, intellectual, philosophical, and historical implications of various movements in art history are explored in order to begin to understand their relationship to the personal artistic development of each student within the history of sculpture. An emphasis is placed on the development of ideas and content in the individual student’s work, which is supported by a series of individual and group critiques by faculty and visiting artists. Weekly class meetings will include slide talks related to current assignments, films, discussions, and field trips to exhibitions around the Philadelphia area. This will be followed by personal conferences with the instructor.

    Prerequisites FASC*201 or FASC*202

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 331 - Carving

    1.5 credits
    Introduces the student to carving, one of the basic methods of forming sculpture. Students learn to prepare, maintain, and use the tools of the carver. They are introduced to the characteristics of suitable carving materials. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of the formal and expressive potentials of carved sculpture.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 363 - Medallic Sculpture

    1.5 credits
    The Medallic Arts have a long history beginning with monetary coins in the ancient world, developing through Renaissance medals into a vital and international art form that now includes small free-standing sculpture. The link between all of these is not only size, but the need for the work to have a specific communicative function, while at the same time exploring the contemporary sculptural issues. This is a studio course with a lecture component to give the student a history of the discipline. Projects are designed to challenge the student conceptually and to introduce forms and techniques such as bas relief, carving, mold making casting and fabricating, all on a small scale. There will be annual opportunities to exhibit the finished sculpture internationally.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

  
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    FASC 364 - Installation and Performance

    3 credits
    This course explores the concepts and practice of installation and performance art and their development during the past century. Four primary aspects of Installation are explored: the multisensory immersive environment; the site-specific work; work responsive to the history, usage, or natural aspects of a particular site or location; interactivity or installations in which the audience is encouraged to participate; and the performance art ranging from theatrical situations through the private acts of the artist that explore particular behavioral, experiential, or social issues and is documented through photos, videos, etc. The history of installation and performance work is discussed through a series of lectures and video presentations that examine the art historical, social, cultural, and psychological concerns from which these art forms are derived. Students are expected to be resourceful and inventive when realizing their work.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation or MMDI*101 and MMDI*102

  
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    FASC 401 - Sculpture III

    3 credits
    Terms like site-specific, monumental, genre, narrative, emblematic, environmental, etc., reflect the cluster of types of sculptural imagery. This studio-criticism course is concerned with the ideational and technical issues raised by various types of sculptural imagery that are assigned in turn. The relationship that sculptures have with the context they exist in and the purpose they serve is stressed.

    Prerequisites FASC*301

    Open to Sculpture & Multidisciplinary majors only.

  
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    FASC 402 - Sculpture III

    3 credits
    Terms like site-specific, monumental, genre, narrative, emblematic, environmental, etc., reflect the cluster of types of sculptural imagery. This studio-criticism course is concerned with the ideational and technical issues raised by various types of sculptural imagery that are assigned in turn. The relationship that sculptures have with the context they exist in and the purpose they serve is stressed.

    Prerequisites FASC*401

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 411 - Advanced Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    For students seriously involved with the figure, this course provides an atelier to continue figure modeling on increasingly advanced levels and a context to help formulate a personal figurative sculptural idiom. Works are sculptured at various scales, including life size, and independent projects are undertaken in consultation with the faculty. Critiques involving the meaning and sculptural significance of the works are an integral part of the ongoing class activity.

    Prerequisites FASC*211, FASC*212, or FASC*203

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 412 - Advanced Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    For students seriously involved with the figure, this course provides an atelier to continue figure modeling on increasingly advanced levels and a context to help formulate a personal figurative sculptural idiom. Works are sculptured at various scales, including life size, and independent projects are undertaken in consultation with the faculty. Critiques involving the meaning and sculptural significance of the works are an integral part of the ongoing class activity.

    Prerequisites FASC*211, FASC*212, or FASC*203

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 413 - Projects in Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    Allows the student to move beyond modeling the figure as an academic study. Exploration using the figure in expressive contexts is emphasized.

    Prerequisites FASC*211, FASC*212, or FASC*203

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 421 - Advanced Projects

    3 credits
    Provides a studio context where maturing self-initiated areas of concentration in sculpture can be developed to fruition on an advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical emphasis is placed through both open and devised assignments on how materials and forms compatible to personal statements are found. Graduate students may register for this course under GRSC 621.

    Prerequisites FASC*221 or FASC*222

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 422 - Advanced Projects

    3 credits
    Provides a studio context where maturing self-initiated areas of concentration in sculpture can be developed to fruition on an advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical emphasis is placed through both open and devised assignments on how materials and forms compatible to personal statements are found. Graduate students may register for this course under GRSC 621.

    Prerequisites FASC*221 or FASC*222

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 433 - Metals

    1.5 credits
    Forming metal sculpture has contributed much to the history of sculpture, particularly in the present, where the idiom has become as familiar as carving and modeling. Concurrently offering both basic and advanced technical instruction in welding and forging, using both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, this course is concerned with both the technical and aesthetic aspects of metal sculpture.

    Priority enrollment to Sculpture and Multidiscipli majors.

  
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    FASC 440 - Sculpture Since 1945

    1.5 credits
    Lectures, discussions, projects concerning various artists, movements, concepts, philosophies, and critical theories influencing contemporary art with an emphasis on sculpture. Focus on the currents since 1945.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Priority enrollment to Fine Arts majors.

  
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    FASC 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.


Foundation Program

  
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    FNDP 101 - Sketching and Drawing

    1.5 credits
    This course provides individuals who are not majoring in visual arts with the basic skills required to represent the form of simple objects and the presence of space on a two-dimensional surface. No prior drawing experience or portfolio of work is required to enroll in this course. In-class projects focus on fundamental principles, while homework assignments support the students as they develop the ability to sketch and draw, and think and plan, using manual drawing tools and materials.

    Priority enrollment for Theater Design and Technology majors. Not open to students in the College of Art, Media, and Design.

  
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    FNDP 102 - Sketching the Human Figure

    1.5 credits
    This course provides individuals who are not majoring in visual arts with an introduction to some of the materials, strategies, and methods useful when drawing the human figure. No prior experience or portfolio of work is required. The course uses the figure as subject. Analytical and responsive approaches are compared and a range of materials are used. The figure, its volume and structure, and immediate spatial environment are studied, and the ability to capture the gesture, appropriate scale, proportion, and mass of the figure are stressed. Homework assignments apply principles learned in class.

    Priority enrollment for Theater Design and Technology majors. Not open to students in the College of Art, Media, and Design.

  
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    FNDP 103 - Color Basics

    1.5 credits
    This course provides individuals who are not majoring in visual arts with the basic skills required to work with color. No prior experience or portfolio of work is required. The course introduces the basic color vocabulary and begins training the eye to perceive and apply the distinctions of hue, value, tone, and temperature. Methods of color classification set the stage for a sequence of projects designed to help students develop the ability to begin working with color formally and descriptively. Homework assignments apply principles learned in class.

    Not open to students in the College of Art, Media, and Design. Priority enrollment for Theater Design and Technology majors.

  
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    FNDP 104 - Materials, Tools and Form

    1.5 credits
    “This course instructs students in those basic manual skills that help them build three-dimensional objects and spatial works. No prior experience with manual media or a portfolio of work is required. Paper and wood are the primary materials used and all assignments include instruction on how to best use these materials. Assignments that focus on the design of spaces and environments are included. Instruction is conducted in the Foundation studio and wood shop, and all students are given an orientation to the safe use of that facility and all its power tools.”

    Not open to students in the College of Art, Media, and Design. Priority enrollment for Theater Design and Technology majors.

  
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    FNDP 105 - Visual Thinking

    3 credits
    Introduces students to the basic language of the visual arts through the study of color, composition, perspective, light, and design. Students develop perceptual skills and understanding using a variety of digital and traditional media to create both representational and nonrepresentational imagery. Text is also introduced as a design element that can be incorporated and manipulated to serve various conceptual and visual aims.

  
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    FNDP 111 - Drawing

    3 credits
    Drawing is approached as a process by which the student examines and investigates the visual world. Line, mark, and shape are among the drawing elements emphasized in the first semester. Students observe the form and structure of various subjects while they improve their skills, strengthen their vision, and begin to define their drawing vocabulary. Graphite pencils and a range of appropriate papers are the most frequently used materials. Focus is on the challenges and rewards of developing perceptual skills.

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 112 - Drawing

    3 credits
    Building on the sensibilities, skills, and information of FNDP 111, students refine their perceptual abilities, utilize a wider range of media, and develop additional drawing strategies. Students study complex natural and organic form, including the human figure in both line and tone. Controlling proportion, building volume, engaging the illusion of space, while at the same time developing the desired quality of light and illumination are issues explored in this semester. Faculty bring skills, projects, and information developed in the two- and three-dimensional classes into the service of drawing.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 142 - Time and Motion

    3 credits
    An introduction to the fundamental principles of time-based art. Serial and sequential principles are developed through the evolution of related sequential images into narrative works using manual and digital assemblage, montage and collage. Students explore two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes and forms utilizing digital video capture of kinetic works, objects, and performance. Students work with digital video recording, editing, and sound applications while investigating the dynamics of time.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111, FNDP*121, and FNDP*131

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 151 - Two Dimensional Design Principles

    3 credits
    This course introduces the fundamental language of the visual arts within the two-dimensional plane, The first semester defines and investigates the visual elements of point, line, shape, pattern and value. These fundamental elements are analyzed as independent units and brought together supporting and animating one another in a variety of formats. The investigation of compositional forces, interactions of shape with format, historic origins, mathematical structures, time-based and sequential concepts are explored. Perceptual skills are developed using a variety of traditional and digital media. Examination of principles of movement in two-dimensional space using animated imagery and digital animation software is incorporated. The discovery of the power of the underlying fundamentals and their application defines the more complex subject of this class.

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 152 - Two Dimensional Design

    3 credits
    This course builds on the projects and skills established in FNDP 151. The majority of FNDP 152 is devoted to the study of color. With color comes additional visual enrichment, light and luminosity, a specialized language and the necessity to mature manual and digital skills, and control new media and concepts. The major works of the semester are based in the use of digital media as well as acrylic paints that require skills of mixing and application. Color theories are discussed, projects requiring tinting, shading, and toning clarify these basic concepts and master works are studied. Ideas developed in the class are shared with the other Foundation courses and skills from 3D and Drawing are imported to support current 2D projects. As the semester progresses, representational and non-representational images are developed as students work to integrate past experience, refine their skills of observation and explore more complex principles of organization. Instructor permission required.

    Prerequisites FNDP*151

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 161 - Three Dimensional Design/Time Motion

    3 credits
    An introduction to the fundamental principles of three-dimensional and time-based work. Concepts of space, movement, mass, volume, and the qualities and properties of materials as well as kinetic works are explored using traditional and digital processes. As the semester progresses the construction of three-dimensional objects emphasizing serial and sequential concepts combines with the use of video for motion capture and other means of exploring fundamental time-based works. The course emphasis is on processes of thinking and planning, thoughtful articulation of form, principles of perception and an appreciation and refinement of acuity in regards to static and kinetic forms.

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 162 - Three Dimensional Design

    3 credits
    Building on the skills, language, and sensibilities of FNDP 161, the second semester undertakes more complex projects. Some projects often involve the combining of several materials and require the assembly of multiple parts. The semester explores the challenges of scale and engages time and movement as ideas. The introduction of environmental works, setting in place new principles of three-dimensional organization, researching the order in nature and taking up the challenge of representation in three dimensions are some of the arenas in which students work. Faculty relate works and share principles with either the two-dimensional, drawing, or time motion classes and attempt to harvest skills and sensibilities developed in those classes to inform of projects in Three-Dimensional Design.

    Prerequisites FNDP*161

    Open to Foundation majors only.

 

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