Oct 23, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue []

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Industrial Design

  
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    IDES 301 - Studio 3: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    Following a year of basic design process, methods, and vocabulary introduction, the Junior Studio sequence focuses on solving more advanced design process and project opportunities through applied integration with Human Factors, Design Semantics, and Design Communication skills. The first semester offers more advanced design projects exploring user-centered design and creative exploration of industrial materials usage. The second semester continues with a focus on collaboration with various community groups and/or industry-sponsored projects.

    Prerequisites IDES*202, IDES*222, and IDES*231

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 302 - Studio 3: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    Following a year of basic design process, methods, and vocabulary introduction, the Junior Studio sequence focuses on solving more advanced design process and project opportunities through applied integration with Human Factors, Design Semantics, and Design Communication skills. The first semester offers more advanced design projects exploring user-centered design and creative exploration of industrial materials usage. The second semester continues with a focus on collaboration with various community groups and/or industry-sponsored projects.

    Prerequisites IDES*301

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 321 - Studio 4: Techniques

    3 credits
    Assists the student in developing graphic communication skills using computational media and applying these skills to both two- and three-dimensional images and presentations. The student is taught to conceptualize, develop, detail, present, and communicate design ideas through graphic design, computer imaging, three-dimensional computer modeling, basic animation, and interactive design presentation. The first semester focuses on integrating graphic software and the development of printed presentations. The second semester focuses on the development of interactive digital presentations.

    Prerequisites IDES*202, IDES*222, and IDES*231

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 322 - Studio 4: Techniques

    3 credits
    Assists the student in developing graphic communication skills using computational media and applying these skills to both two- and three-dimensional images and presentations. The student is taught to conceptualize, develop, detail, present, and communicate design ideas through graphic design, computer imaging, three-dimensional computer modeling, basic animation, and interactive design presentation. The first semester focuses on integrating graphic software and the development of printed presentations. The second semester focuses on the development of interactive digital presentations.

    Prerequisites IDES*321

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 331 - Human Factors Seminar

    3 credits
    The object of this research-intensive course is to develop an ability to apply technology effectively to meet human needs through the study of human engineering principles for the design of products and equipment. Human anatomy, anthropometrics and motion, and strength of body components are considered as are sensory systems, human perception, and sensitivities. Lectures are complemented by laboratory experiments designed to teach students methods of testing and evaluating their own product design concepts in human terms. Concepts of scientific writing and reporting are demonstrated through the documentation of coursework.

    Prerequisites IDES*301, IDES*232, IDES*321, and IDES*332

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 332 - Design Semantics Seminar

    3 credits
    This seminar addresses design as a languaging process of social interaction. Semantic principles and design vocabulary are introduced through lectures, weekly readings, discussions, and exercises. Students work on individual as well as team-based projects to increase their competence in translating these ideas, concepts, and principles into design practices, applying replicable design methods towards proposing particular products whose meanings matter and whose use is dominated by facets of human understanding.

    Prerequisites IDES*202, IDES*222, and IDES*231

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 371 - Architectonics

    1.5 credits
    An elective course intended as a multidisciplinary forum for the investigation, appreciation, and design of architectural space, structures, and systems. Using in-class exercises as a laboratory for creative and collaborative exchange, students learn alternative design processes, design vocabulary, user-centered experience and design. This course develops concepts and analytical studies of objects/spaces through various 2D and 3D drawing/modeling techniques and culminates in an actual built/altered environment. Graduate students may register for this course under GRID 624.

  
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    IDES 401 - Studio 5: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    These studio courses focus on decisive and responsible positions in formulating new design directions. Building upon past learning, projects sharpen fundamental skills of sketching (2D & 3D), design drawing, computer modeling, prototyping and conceptual diagramming. Students are encouraged through critical discourse and research on historical and contemporary material of cultural shifts to formulate their own ideology. Project proposals forward questions such as social context, ergonomics, and ecological consequences. Students are expected to identify local stakeholders (industry, users, designers, etc.) and ask them to be topic advisors as appropriate. First-semester projects are dedicated to three fast-paced, highly theoretical, predefined topics. The next semester is devoted to further development of one of these projects. This final semester-long project works toward project closure and pragmatic articulation, ready to be shown both inside and outside an academic context.

    Prerequisites IDES*302, IDES*322, IDES*331, and IDES*332

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 402 - Studio 5: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    These studio courses focus on decisive and responsible positions in formulating new design directions. Building upon past learning, projects sharpen fundamental skills of sketching (2D & 3D), design drawing, computer modeling, prototyping and conceptual diagramming. Students are encouraged through critical discourse and research on historical and contemporary material of cultural shifts to formulate their own ideology. Project proposals forward questions such as social context, ergonomics, and ecological consequences. Students are expected to identify local stakeholders (industry, users, designers, etc.) and ask them to be topic advisors as appropriate. First-semester projects are dedicated to three fast-paced, highly theoretical, predefined topics. The next semester is devoted to further development of one of these projects. This final semester-long project works toward project closure and pragmatic articulation, ready to be shown both inside and outside an academic context.

    Prerequisites IDES*401

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 421 - Studio 6: Professional Communication

    3 credits
    Refines the students’ written, verbal, and visual presentation skills and assists them in developing communication materials for their senior theses and industry-sponsored projects. Intensive group critique of individual presentations prepared outside of class. Students develop self-promotion, presentation, and correspondence materials utilizing service bureaus and contemporary technologies such as digital files, fax, and the World Wide Web to prepare and transmit this information.

    Prerequisites IDES*302, IDES*322, IDES*331, and IDES*332

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 422 - Studio 6: Professional Communication

    3 credits
    Refines the students’ written, verbal, and visual presentation skills and assists them in developing communication materials for their senior theses and industry-sponsored projects. Intensive group critique of individual presentations prepared outside of class. Students develop self-promotion, presentation, and correspondence materials utilizing service bureaus and contemporary technologies such as digital files, fax, and the World Wide Web to prepare and transmit this information.

    Prerequisites IDES*421

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 431 - Design Theory Seminar

    3 credits
    In this industrial design seminar, students investigate design philosophies, issues, and pedagogy, from a historic as well as contemporary international design context. Students study various definitions of design, explore design theories and issues, and consider theoretical relationships with other applied arts.

    Prerequisites IDES*302, IDES*322, IDES*331, and IDES*332

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 432 - Design Practice Seminar

    3 credits
    Exposes the student to industrial design professional practice through discussion, lectures, and research. The following subjects are addressed: 1. Running a practice, 2. Legalities and contracts, 3. Publications/exhibitions, 4. Client interaction, 5. Job search, recruiters and directories, 6. Networking (etiquette and strategy), 7. Work structure (internship, freelance, in-house etc.). Visitors and field trips represent a broad spectrum of the design community including design shop owners, design curators from galleries or museums, industrial design entrepreneurs, and copyright lawyers.

    Prerequisites IDES*431

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.


Liberal Arts

  
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    LACR 008 - English as Second Language

    3 credits
    LACR 008 prepares students for whom English is a second language to produce the kinds of writing and presentations expected of them on the college level, and to improve their reading and critical thinking skills. This course focuses on prose techniques. Students will learn to respond in writing and speaking to readings and to the work of other students. The workshop format engages students in collaborative learning activities. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam, the Michigan Placement Test, and TOEFL scores. Students will receive a grade, but this course does not count toward graduation. Successful completion of this course will permit the students to enter LACR 009, LACR 100, or LACR 101, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

  
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    LACR 009 - Fundamentals of Composition I

    3 credits
    LACR 009 develops students’ critical reading and writing skills so that they may employ the writing processes expected at the college level. The emphasis is on reading comprehension and writing processes (analyzing, applying, and evaluating), as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Develop critical reading and writing skills: describing, summarizing, evaluating, and interpreting. 2. Compose a thesis and support it in the body of the essay in well-structured paragraphs. 3. Analyze sources (locate the author’s thesis and evidence). 4. Apply source material through quotation, paraphrase, and summary. 5. Understand how to avoid intentional or unintentional plagiarism. 6. Access source material in the stacks of the library. 7. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. This course does not count toward graduation. Successful completion will permit students to enter LACR 100 or LACR 101, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

  
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    LACR 100 - Fundamentals of Composition II

    3 credits
    In LACR 100 the emphasis is on the reading and writing processes that lead to argumentation, as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Students practice critical reading and writing skills in order to develop academic essays: describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. They are introduced to the library’s holdings and taught to access and assess source material. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Demonstrate the critical reading and writing skills needed to construct academic essays – describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. 2. Compose a question-based research paper (about four pages in length) and support a thesis in the body of the essay in properly structured paragraphs. Apply source material avoiding intentional or unintentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase, and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography) Synthesize source material to support a deductive argument 3. Assess scholarly sources (locate the author’s thesis, evaluate evidence, and weigh credibility). 4. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 5. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. Successful completion of LACR 008 or LACR 009 may be required as a result of the English Placement Exam. This course substitutes for LACR 101 and successful completion of this course will permit students to enter LACR 102 or LACR 103, depending on the teacher’s recommendation, in the following semester.

    Successful completion of LACR*008 where required a, result of English placement exam. Successful completion of LACR*009 where required as a, result of English placement exam.

  
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    LACR 101 - First-Year Writing I

    3 credits
    LACR 101 is the first part of a year-long writing, reading and research course that teaches the fundamental aspects of the responsible student-scholar. The emphasis is on the reading and writing processes that lead to argumentation, as well as on the technical aspects of writing, specifically essay structure, paragraph construction, grammar, punctuation and spelling. Students practice critical reading and writing skills to develop academic essays: describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying and synthesizing. They are introduced to the library’s holdings and taught to access and assess source material. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Demonstrate the critical reading and writing skills needed to construct academic essays describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying, and synthesizing. 2. Compose a question-based research paper (about four pages in length) and support a thesis in the body of the essay in properly structured paragraphs. *Apply source material avoiding intentional or intentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography). *Synthesize source material to support a deductive argument. 3. Assess scholarly sources (locate the authors thesis, evaluate evidence, and weigh credibility). 4. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 5. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling) to write clear sentences. Enrollment is based on performance on the English Placement Exam and SAT/ACT scores. Successful completion of LACR 008 or LACR 009 may be required as a result of the English Placement Exam.

    Successful completion of LACR*008 where required a, result of English placement exam. Successful completion of LACR*009 where required as a, result of English placement exam. Enrollment in BS, BFA, or BM degree program required.

  
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    LACR 102 - First-Year Writing II

    3 credits
    A continuation of LACR 101, LACR 102 is the second part of a year-long course that builds on and develops the writing and reading processes that lead to argumentation. During this term an inquiry-based research paper is the focus, as well as grammatical and structural elements of writing college-level essays. The independent research project allows students to utilize the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 101-describing summarizing, analyzing. applying, and synthesizing-to develop a scholarly argument. To illustrate the importance of context in the process of research, a curriculum that is focused around a chosen historical period is examined. Students continue to access and assess the source material available from the library. By the end of this course successful students will: 1. Employ and further develop the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 101-describing, summarizing, analyzing, and synthesizing-to compose a major research essay (about seven pages in length) and build an argument based on previous scholarship, elaborating upon an authors argument orally and in writing. *Conduct independent research through book, periodicals, reference works, on-line databases, interviews, etc. *Synthesize primary and secondary source material to develop a scholarly argument. *Apply source material avoiding intentional or unintentional plagiarism through direct quotation and paraphrase and cite in MLA format (in-text citations and bibliography).*Create an annotated bibliography with five to seven sources that illustrates the ability to access and assess various types of source material. 2. Assess primary and secondary sources (locate authors thesis evaluate evidence, weigh credibility). 3. Access source material through the library holdings: reference section, on-line databases, stacks, and in-library periodicals. 4. Recognize and edit patterns of grammatical error (sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, verb tense, punctuation, and spelling)to write clear sentences.

    Prerequisites LACR*101 or LACR*100

  
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    LACR 103 - Fundamentals of Composition III

    3 credits
    A continuation of LACR 100, LACR 103 is the second part of a year-long course that builds on and develops the writing and reading processes that lead to argumentation. During this term an inquiry-based research paper is the focus, as well as the grammatical and structural elements of writing college-level essays. The independent research project allows students to utilize the critical reading and writing skills introduced in 100 or 101 – describing, summarizing, analyzing, applying and synthesizing – to develop a scholarly argument. To illustrate the importance of context in the process of research, a curriculum that is focused around a chosen period is examined. Students continue to access and assess the source material available from the library. As this course is six hours per week, one-to-one time with the instructor is built into the class, so students can work on individual reading and writing issues.

    Prerequisites LACR*100

  
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    LACR 210 - Texts & Contexts: Perspectives on The Humanities

    3 credits
    Perspectives on the Humanities addresses significant works from the ancient world, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, and the present day. The course serves five functions: to help students develop their skills in critical reading and writing; to introduce study of traditionally defined periods in the history of culture; to introduce a thematic approach to Humanities topics; to examine key primary texts from various periods and consider them alongside comparable art works; to explore the possibility that conventional ideas of period studies are open to challenge and reinterpretation. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Read and interpret college level texts, demonstrating competence in these critical reading skills: a. Summarizing and paraphrasing; b. Recognizing and outlining main ideas and themes, rhetorical strategies, chains of evidence; c. Drawing relevant connections between and among texts; d. Evaluating the effectiveness of an argument, the strategy of its presentation, and the evidence produced; e. Describing, analyzing, and evaluating the effectiveness of artistic writing. 2. Demonstrate their competence in reading assigned texts through progressively sophisticated writing assignments, including summarizing, paraphrasing, interpretation, analysis, and evaluation. 3. Demonstrate competence in assessing and using secondary sources including proper MLA citations and bibliography. 4. Outline the broad development of Western Civilization and discuss key components of Classical, Renaissance, and Romantic/Modern culture. 5. Express both subjective and objective evaluations of cultural artifacts and movements in reasoned and persuasive argument in both personal and scholarly writing.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Enrollment in BS, BFA, or BM degree program required.

  
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    THEA 356 - Advanced Playwriting

    3 credits
    A follow-up to Playwriting. Students further develop their writing and revising skills. In addition, the class analyzes selected contemporary plays and write playwrights’ critiques of modern theatrical practices. Students complete a polished one-act or radio drama.

    Prerequisites THEA*355


Liberal Arts - Art History

  
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    LAAH 111 - Art History Survey I

    3 credits
    A survey of Western visual arts and architecture from the earliest extant examples, cave painting and sculpture from Austrian and southern Europe to the arts of the Renaissance in Europe in the 14th-15th centuries. Students will be asked to visit and do research on the art in local museums and galleries in order to gain a foundation for the work from their textbook, and asked to place, evaluate, and comprehend the history of the world in which many of them make their art. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Evaluate the formal qualities of works of art. 2. Contextualize works of art within an art-historical style/time period. 3. Articulate the relationships between cultures and periods in the work of particular artists and styles. 4. Illustrate their understanding of art as it has been defined in human experience and as it may relate to their lives as artists. 5. Demonstrate their understanding of how even the most ancient examples of art may be sources for contemporary art. 6. Demonstrate their descriptive and critical writing skills with respect to works of art observed in museum settings. 7. Learn to use the appropriate vocabulary for discussing works of art in an Art Historical context.

    Enrollment in BS, BFA, or BM degree program required. Successful completion of LACR*009 where required as a, result of English placement exam. Successful completion of LACR*007 where required a, result of English placement exam. Successful completion of LACR*008 where required a, result of English placement exam.

  
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    LAAH 112 - Art History Survey II

    3 credits
    Following the first half of the Survey of Western Art, this course will consider Western visual arts and architecture from the Renaissance in Europe in the 14th-15th centuries to the present. As in the first semester, students will be asked to visit and do research on the art in local museums and galleries, and consider this more modern world as it relates to their own art and thought. They will be tested regularly and expected to write short essays about the work they have studied firsthand. By the end of this course, successful students will: 1. Evaluate the formal qualities of works of art. 2. Contextualize works of art within an art-historical style/time period. 3. Articulate the relationship between cultures and periods in the work of particular artists and styles. 4. Illustrate their understanding of art as it has been defined in human experience and as it may relate to their lives as artists. 5. Demonstrate their understanding of how even the most ancient examples of art may be sources for contemporary art. 6. Demonstrate their descriptive and critical writing skills with respect to works of art observed in museum settings. 7. Learn to use the appropriate vocabulary for discussing works of art in an Art Historical context.

    Enrollment in BS, BFA, or BM degree program required. Successful completion of LACR*009 where required as a, result of English placement exam.

  
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    LAAH 811 - Ancient Art

    3 credits
    A consideration of art and myth in Western Civilization as they are represented in their earliest forms beginning in ca. 3000 BCE in the cultures of the Ancient Middle East, Egypt, and the Aegean. It concludes with the arts of Classical Greece in the 5th-4th centuries BCE in recognition of their seminal influence on the arts of the West.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 813 - Medieval Art

    3 credits
    This course examines the sculpture, architecture, painting and decorative arts of Europe from the early Christian period in the 3rd century C.E. to the proto-Renaissance in Italy in the 14th century. The course focuses on the emergence and flowering of a European mystical Christian vision as distinct from the earlier monumental classical vision Greece and Rome.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 815 - Art in Renaissance Europe

    3 credits
    The painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts of the 14th and 15th centuries in the major artistic centers of Northern Europe and in Italy are studied. The course compares and contrasts the works of painters such as Jan Van Eyck and Masaccio; and sculptors such as Claus Sluter and Donatello, who enriched both the habitations and churches of their secular and religious patrons and the proud and expanding mercantile cities in which they lived.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 817 - Baroque Art

    3 credits
    This course studies the work of the major European painters and sculptors of the 17th century; Bernini, Rubens, Velasquez, Rembrandt, Poussin and Vermeer. More specialized artists - painters of landscape, still life genre, and the portrait - will also be considered.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 819 - 19th Century Art

    3 credits
    This course investigates change and diversity as represented by the major painters, sculptors and architects of Europe and America in this emerging Modernist century. Style categories under consideration include Neo-classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 821 - American Art to 1945

    3 credits
    A survey of American art, architecture, and design, emphasizing the 19th and early 20th centuries. The material covered is divided into a series of sections or themes and is considered in relation to tradition. Each section or theme is studied through the work of the major artists who best represent it.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 823 - Introduction to Art Historical Methodologies

    3 credits
    Introduction to Art Historical Methodologies will explore the theoretical threads that shape art history and, overall, how art historians construct methodological approaches. For an art historian, competing or contrasting theories are not mutually exclusive tools. In other words, historians may use a number of theories to shape an argument. The methodological framework is the foundation of the text, but the author may not reveal the theoretical structure explicitly. Critically reading to recognize how art historians build interpretive methods is the aim of this introductory course.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 830 - Modern Art

    3 credits
    At the beginning of the 20th century, artists responded to new technological forces and the pressures of mass culture in styles such as cubism, constructivism, and surrealism - styles that are still being explored by our contemporaries. The course surveys the period 1880-1980, emphasizing the continuity of the modern artist’s situation and role.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 831 - American Art Since 1945

    3 credits
    In 1945, World War II ended and the focus of modern art shifted from Paris to New York City. The course begins with Abstract Expressionism; studies other major American styles, such as pop art and minimalism; and concludes with post-modernist development such as performance and decoration by artists. Graduate students may register for this course under GRLA 631.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 832 - European Art Since 1945

    3 credits
    Art since World War II has been dominated by the New York market and by the issue of abstraction; in Europe, however, artists continued to use the human figure as a vehicle for social and ethical concerns, and, more recently, their engagement has become a model for younger artists in both Europe and America. The course will look at crafts and book arts as well as fine arts; it will also make use of plays and films.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 835 - Akhenaton and the Amarna Period: Revolution and Reaction in Ancient Egypt

    3 credits
    This course examines the Amarna Period of the Egyptian New Kingdom and its most famous ruler, Akhenaten. The course will review the history of the Old and Middle Kingdoms as prelude to the study of Akhenaten’s revolutionary reign.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 LACR*210;

  
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    LAAH 851 - History of Industrial Design

    3 credits
    A survey of industrial design in the West, paying particular attention to developments in the 20th century.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Industrial Design majors.

  
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    LAAH 853 - History of Crafts

    3 credits
    A survey of the principal movements and tendencies in Western crafts since the middle of the 19th century. Main topics include the arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, the Bauhaus, the interrelationships among fine arts, crafts, and design, and postmodernism.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
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    LAAH 854 - History of Communication Design

    3 credits
    A survey of two-dimensional design in the West, with particular attention to developments in the 20th century.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Graphic Design majors.

  
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    LAAH 855 - History of Photography

    3 credits
    An introduction to the significant photographers and their work in the history of the medium, including technical developments and their impact, the major visual and aesthetic trends in the development of photography and their relationship to art in general, and the larger social context in which photography has developed.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Photography majors.

  
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    LAAH 861 - Arts of China

    3 credits
    This course covers ceramics, sculpture, painting, and other arts of China from the Neolithic through the last Chinese dynasty, that is from roughly 10,000 BCE to 1911. (If time permits some comments may be made about 20th century Chinese art.) A brief introduction to the historical and social background of each period will be presented as the outstanding arts and art styles of each period are examined. Particular attention will be paid to what, if any, uniquely Chinese characteristics are evident in the arts of China. Art recovered from major archaeological discoveries in China including the ‘terra cotta’ warriors found near the tomb of China’s first emperor will be introduced and reviewed. Important masterworks of Chinese art in all media will also be analyzed and discussed. The influence of religion on Chinese art, particularly Buddhism, will be addressed, and we will also look at Chinese painting in some detail, especially at how figure painting came to be eclipsed by landscape painting. One quiz, mid-term and final examinations, and one short paper.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 862 - Arts of Africa

    3 credits
    Artistic, religious, sociological, and geographic aspects of societies in sub-Saharan Africa are studied in order to establish continuity as well as distinction between their art forms. Black American folk art, an extension and transformation of African art, is analyzed.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 863 - Arts of India

    3 credits
    Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Indus Valley civilization of the second millennium B.C.E. through the different periods of the Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic dominance to the Raiput painting of the 18th century C.E. The different art styles are related to their historical, religious, and social background.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 864 - Art of Islam

    3 credits
    The course covers architecture, architectural decoration, calligraphy, book illustration, textile and ceramic art of the Middle Eastern countries from the beginning of the Islamic era (7th century C.E.-8th century C.E.). It studies the impact of Islamic religion on the character of Islamic art and architecture. It also studies the various regional styles within this unified visual mode of expression. From time to time Islamic and Christian cultures will be compared so as to understand better the similarities and differences of the two.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 865 - Arts of Japan

    3 credits
    This course covers the architecture, ceramics, painting, and sculpture of Japan from 11,000 BCE to the 19th century CE, and if time permits into the 20th, and 21st centuries. It considers and examines the special characteristics of Japanese art, and analyzes the influence of Chinese art and culture on Japanese art and culture. Particular attention will be paid Buddhist art, especially that influenced by Zen Buddhism. In addition, Japan’s unique achievements in illustrated narrative hand-scrolls of the 12th and 13th centuries and decorative screens of the 16th-18th centuries will be highlighted. One quiz, one paper, a mid-term, and final examination.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 931 - History and Aesthetics of 20th Century Performance Art

    3 credits
    This course traces the evolution of Performance Art including its roots in Futurism, Constructivism, the Bauhaus, Dada, Surrealism, Fluxus movement, parallel movements in Japanese Butoh dance, European Figurentheater, developments of media in performance, autobiographical performance, and spectacle. Video slides are shown to portray the visual impact of the genre.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 933 - Modern Architecture

    3 credits
    The course investigates modern architecture, its theoretical premises, and the social context that generated it. Students will also inquire into modern architecture’s legacy: postmodern architecture.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 935 - Dada and Surrealism

    3 credits
    The history of the post-World War I antirational movements Dada and Surrealism. Since these were literary and political as well as artistic movements, attention is given to texts by such authors as Artaud, Breton, Freud, Jarry, Rimbaud, and Tzara, as well as to works of art.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 937 - Abstract Expressionism

    3 credits
    Abstract Expressionism was the most important movement in post-WWII American art. This course surveys its origins, accomplishments, and decline.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 970 - Major Artists

    3 credits
    The course concentrates on a single artist or a group of related artists. Among the artists who have come under this intense investigation have been Donatello, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, and Picasso. The course has been designed to give students an in-depth knowledge of one artist’s life and art or the artists of a single school.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 973 - Women Artists

    3 credits
    A chronological survey of professional female painters and sculptors active in Western Europe and the United States, from the 16th century to the present. The role played by women artists in earlier ages, other nations, and different media is also examined. Three written assignments.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 974 - Topics in Design

    3 credits
    A seminar in the history of design. Each semester the course is taught, a different aspect of design history is studied. Individual designers under consideration have been Wright, Le Corbusier, and Aalto; other topics have been particular design histories: crafts history, graphic design history, industrial design history; and particular styles of design: The Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Bauhaus, de Stijl and Constructivism, Art Deco, and Post-Modernism.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LAAH 975 - “dirty Pictures” a History of Art Censorship

    3 credits
    “There has been some form of art censorship, virtually everywhere in the world, as long as there has been art. For centuries visual artworks deemed offensive have been altered or destroyed, their audiences restricted and their creators fined, imprisoned, harassed, and/or physically harmed. The purpose of this course is to examine important cases of art censorship, to try and understand why this phenomenon has been so widespread and long-lasting and to consider its implications within, and beyond, the art community today and for the future. After briefly surveying the history of art censorship in the Western world from antiquity through the mid-20th century, this course will focus on five recent case studies - particularly notorious instances of art censorship that occurred in the U.S. between 1982 and 2004. We will examine the basic facts of each case, then review and discuss the principal responses it has generated and its subsequent implications, from several points of view. Some of the complex questions to be explored will include: Exactly what constitutes ‘censorship’? Under what circumstances might censorship be justified? Should different criteria be applied to potentially controversial public art, vs. the art displayed in art galleries and museums?”

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103


Liberal Arts - Languages & Literature

  
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    LALL 801 - French I

    3 credits
    Students study the basic elements of French grammar through conversation and drills derived from readings of easy modern prose and from a cultural reader.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 802 - French I

    3 credits
    Students study the basic elements of French grammar through conversation and drills derived from readings of easy modern prose and from a cultural reader.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 803 - German I

    3 credits
    One-year course of basic grammar. The aim of the course is to develop reading, writing, and conversing skills of the first-year German student.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 804 - German I

    3 credits
    One-year course of basic grammar. The aim of the course is to develop reading, writing, and conversing skills of the German student.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 805 - Italian I

    3 credits
    This course covers conversation about everyday Italian life and culture and basic grammar through reading of Italian prose.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 806 - Italian I

    3 credits
    This course covers conversation about everyday Italian life and culture and basic grammar through reading of Italian prose.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 807 - Spanish I

    3 credits
    This introduction to Spanish is open to students who have had little to no previous Spanish language experience. In this course, the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, pronunciation and Spanish culture are introduced. Students will develop listening comprehension, speaking, and writing skills. Emphasis on conversational Spanish.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 808 - Spanish II

    3 credits
    Spanish II is the continuation of Spanish I. It is open to students who have had Spanish I or equivalent high school experience. In this course, the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, pronunciation and Spanish culture are further developed. Students will improve listening comprehension, speaking, and writing skills. Emphasis on conversational Spanish.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 and LALL*807 or permission from the department

  
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    LALL 809 - Latin I

    3 cr, 3 hrs
    This course introduces the Latin language, some Latin authors in translation, and aspects of Roman culture.  The course will cover approximately half of standard Latin grammar.  Assignments will include reading and translation exercises and selections from ancient Latin texts.  By the end of the course, students should understand the fundamentals of Latin grammar, have a basic working vocabulary, and be able to read simple Latin texts.

    Prerequisites Prerequisite: LACR 102
     

  
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    LALL 811 - Western Literary Masterpieces I Ancient to Medieval

    3 credits
    Works from antiquity through the Middle Ages that form the foundation of Western literature. Focuses on the creation of character, the structure and form of the works and the perspectives and values they reveal. Examines the questions asked by different cultures and how human potential, fate, and reality are defined.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 812 - Western Literary Masterpieces II Renaissance to Neoclassical

    3 credits
    Works from the Renaissance through the Neoclassical period that form the foundation of Western Literature. Focuses on the creation of character, on structure and form, but also on tone (humor, parody, satire, and irony) and the perspectives and the values that the works reveal.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 815 - Romanticism

    3 credits
    A study of the Romantic movement in England, including the major poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats), several novelists (including Bronte’s “”Wuthering Heights”” and Mary Shelley’s “”Frankenstein”“), samplings from the letters and essays. Some of the predominant Romantic themes - the artist as outcast, revolution, man’s relation to nature - are addressed.

    Prerequisites LACR*102

  
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    LALL 821 - Lyric Poetry

    3 credits
    A survey of lyric poetry, with particular emphasis on a single period or a group of poets, e.g., Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, and the English Romantics.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 822 - Haiku: Classical to Contemporary

    3 credits
    A survey of Haiku poetry from its development in Japan to its influence on American and world poets of the 20th century. This short, enigmatic poetic form is approached from three perspectives. First, we will focus on understanding the craft of haiku and the use of that knowledge to interpret the individual poems. Second, the foundations of haikus aesthetic principles as they developed over the centuries in Japan. And third, the influence of Japanese haiku on such 20th century poets such as Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, and the Beat poets. Throughout the course, English language haiku of contemporary North American poets is read, and students write their own haiku verses.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 823 - Women Writers

    3 credits
    This course explores and perhaps reclaims, the provocative treasures of women writers, ancient and contemporary, and their potential capacity to transform us as human beings. The various works studied, from the ancient poetic fragments of Sappho to the solitary lyrics of Emily Dickinson, from the fictional classics of Bronte, Austen, Wharton, and Virginia Woolf, to the twentieth century voices of Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, and Julia Alvarez, all give us the spectrum of authenticity in the female voice. In our reading, the questions will emerge: Do women think/write differently from men? What is the role of gender in the artistic imagination? As a counter example, students will also look at Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, with its classical work in feminine psychology, and Gilbert and Gubar’s groundbreaking textual analysis of women writers.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 825 - The Short Story

    3 credits
    A study of the short story from Poe to the present. Samplings from the British, the American, and the European, with particular attention to the major authors who reinvented the genre. At the end of the semester, students look at developments in contemporary fiction, the anti-story, the new wave, the surreal, the minimal, the funny, the mythic.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 831 - 19th Century American Writers

    3 credits
    From the Gothic darkness of Edgar Allan Poe to Stephen Crane’s Red Badge, from Irving’s mystic Sleepy Hollow to Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter, from Thoreau’s idyll on Walden Pond to Melville’s terror rounding Cape Horn, from Whitman’s barbaric shout to Emily Dickinson’s lyric whisper, from Emerson’s ‘Self-Reliance’ to Mark Twain’s despairing loss of innocence, the trajectory of American Literature in the 19th century traces a movement from the past to the future. This course looks at the major writers of 19th century America, a fascinating and revolutionary period in American art, where an American past becomes an American Voice and our Original Sins form our future.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 832 - 20th Century American Writers

    3 credits
    An introduction to 20th century American literature and its roots. What can be traced in that literature is a movement from idealism to cynicism or, perhaps, from idealism to realism. As America from an agrarian, small town culture to an increasingly urban and industrialized society, the American Dream of infinite potential and freedom for each citizen was re-mapped, just as the Western movement changed the geographical landscape of America. How the individual - the ‘little guy’ marginalized from self and society - reacted to this aloneness, this powerlessness is the focus of the course. We ask, as a new American century begins, what does it mean now to dream dreams, to endure nightmares? What truths do Americans continue to hold as self-evident in the wake of international terrorist violence and the uncharted seas of a new future? Of what use is literature in this?

    Prerequisites LACR*102 LACR*103

  
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    LALL 833 - African American Literature

    3 credits
    Readings may include works by Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Imamu Baraka, and Gwendolyn Brooks, focusing on the larger question of the role of the African-American writer in American society.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 835 - American Politics and Culture: 1945-1975

    3 credits
    The interaction of politics and culture from 1940 to 1975. Course material includes fiction and poetry, history and journalism, and film.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 841 - Introduction to Mythology

    3 credits
    This course defines mythmaking and analyzes different approaches to myth. The class will explore the function of different myths, their relevance to the culture that created them, and the forms through which the myths survive, particularly the epic and tragedy.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 842 - Literature of the Roman Empire

    3 credits
    After a glance at Greek influences, the course focuses on the literature of classical Rome. Readings from epic, drama, and lyric, with an emphasis on the interaction between those classical forms and the culture that produced them.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 843 - Latin American Literature

    3 credits
    The major literary trends and writers of Latin America where the way in which writers such as Rulfo, Marquez, Lezama Lima, and Mutis reinvented the Western literary tradition as they incorporated a common landscape and history into their work. The origins of both their style and imagery are traced by looking at earlier exponents of Latin American literatures.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 851 - Greek Drama

    3 credits
    Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes are examined to understand their integrity as works of art and to develop an appreciation of the extraordinary accomplishment of Greek drama.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 852 - Modern Drama

    3 credits
    A study of the modern theater from the end of the 19th century to the mid-20th century. Students read some of the world’s most famous playwrights: Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Lorca, Brecht, and Beckett. Theater trips are part of the experience of this course.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 853 - Contemporary Drama

    3 credits
    A study of the experimental developments in today’s theater, both on Broadway and off, from ‘Waiting for Godot’ to the present moment. Students read some of the most famous playwrights of our times: Genet, Beckett, Ionesco, Albee, Pinter, and Shepard, as well as some not so well-known. Theater trips are part of the experience of this course.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 860 - Literature & Film

    3 credits
    This course explores different subjects through the arts of literature and film. Among the topics treated have been images of Vietnam, the thriller, and science fiction.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 861 - Film History

    3 credits
    A survey of the history of film. Films to be shown are selected from the following categories: early film forms (Lumiere, Griffith, and De Mille); Dada and Surrealist influences (Leger, Bunuel, Marx Brothers, and Resnais); the impact of Constructivism and the Machine Aesthetic (Eisenstein, Vertov, and Chaplin); German Expressionists’ influence on Hollywood (Ford, Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock); modern European and American films (Bergman, Godard, Kubrick, and Altman); and avant-garde art influences on new American cinema (Deren and Brakhage).

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 862 - Issues in National Cinema

    3 credits
    This course selects films from modern and post-modern European cinema and from emerging national cinema. The films chosen will demonstrate both their interaction with politics and culture and an alternative discourse to Hollywood commercial filmmaking. Films are selected from the following: Italian Neo-Realism; French Revised Wave; postwar European national cinema; other national cinemas (China, Japan, Brazil, Chile, etc.).

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 871 - Poetry Writing Workshop

    3 credits
    Students’ poems are discussed, criticized, revised, and improved. Principles governing the decision to change a poem in various ways, the study of poems by American and English poets, the reading of some criticism, and concentration on the basic principles of craft are all included. Theories involve sound, content, meaning, and purpose of student poems and of poetry in general. The poet’s sense of an audience also figures in the discussion.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 873 - Playwriting

    3 credits
    This workshop course introduces students to the discipline of writing for theater and radio. Focusing on the elements necessary for the creation of producible scripts, the student develops practical skills leading to the creation of a short work for stage or radio by the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Theater Management and Production majors.

  
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    LALL 875 - Fiction Writing Workshop

    3 credits
    This course focuses on writing short fiction in a workshop setting. Students study the elements of creative writing, experiment with several forms, and develop a clear voice. The goal is to produce a portfolio of finished pieces.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 901 - French II

    3 credits
    This course is open to students who have completed French I or have had two years or more of high school French. Emphasis speaking French and reading French short stories, modern poetry, newspapers and magazines.

    Prerequisites LALL*802

  
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    LALL 902 - French II

    3 credits
    This course is open to students who have completed French I or have had two or more years of high school French. Emphasis speaking French and reading French short stories, modern poetry, newspapers and magazines.

    Prerequisites LALL*901

  
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    LALL 905 - Italian II

    3 credits
    Open to students who have completed Italian I or have had two or more years of high school Italian. Verbal skills in Italian are developed as well as the ability to read poetry, short stories, and newspaper articles in Italian.

    Prerequisites LALL 806

  
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    LALL 906 - Italian II

    3 credits
    A continuation of LALL 905. Open to students who have completed Italian I or have had two or more years of high school Italian. Verbal skill in Italian and ability to read poetry, short stories, and newspaper articles in Italian.

    Prerequisites LALL*905

  
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    LALL 907 - Spanish III

    3 credits
    An accelerated course which reviews the basic principles of the Spanish language for students with some background of high school Spanish or Spanish I and II at UArts. Spanish grammar and culture are introduced in the context of short literacy readings, and articles from newspapers and periodicals. This course helps students develop listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It is given predominantly in Spanish.

    Prerequisites LALL*807 and LALL*808 or permission from the department.

    Restrictions Experience Required- See Dept.
  
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    LALL 908 - Spanish IV

    3 credits
    This course will offer a content-based review of Spanish grammar and systematic vocabulary and skill development. At this level, more advanced grammatical structures are presented. The course integrates language, culture, art, and literature. It is given predominantly in Spanish.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 and LALL*907 or permission from the LA department

    Restrictions Experience Required- See Dept.
  
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    LALL 911 - Major Writers

    3 credits
    Focuses on the life and work of a single important writer. Among the authors who have received this intense examination have been James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and Emily Dickinson.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 913 - Nineteenth Century Novel

    3 credits
    We study some of the most admired, best loved books of the world, written in the heyday of the novel, the 19th-century: ‘Crime and Punishment’ by Dostoevsky, ‘Madame Bovary’ by Flaubert, ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Bronte, ‘Great Expectations’ by Dickens, ‘Portrait of a Lady’ by James. This is a course for people who love to read.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 914 - Contemporary Novel

    3 credits
    This is a course for people who like to read. We study 10 (count ‘em 10!) novels by some of the most interesting authors of the past two decades including works from North and South America and Eastern and Western Europe. Some are weird, some beautiful, some sexy, some funny.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 915 - Modern Poetry

    3 credits
    The course considers both the central figures and central movements in modern poetry. The first part of the semester will look at the stylistic changes and the ideological currents which shaped the high modernist mode. The second part of the course will explore the major figures through their most important works. Figures include Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, and Frost.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 916 - Contemporary Poetry

    3 credits
    The course surveys both the central figures and the central movements in contemporary poetry. The course looks at the dominant currents that emerged after WWII, including Beats, Confessional, and New York Schools. The class will explore the formal, technical, thematic experimentation of the poetry written in the 60s and early 70s. Finally, the course examines the way a younger generation of poets has come to terms with the work of their predecessors.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 921 - Superheroes

    3 credits
    This course examines the most important heroes of popular culture in the Middle Ages - Beowulf, Roland, Siegfried, and King Arthur. What do these heroes and the epics in which they appear reveal about their culture? How do they compare to modern popular superheroes?

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 922 - Big Fat Famous Novel

    3 credits
    Three of the world’s best and most important novels: Tolstoy’s ‘War and Peace,’ Melville’s ‘Moby Dick,’ and Joyce’s ‘Ulysses’ are read. Each provides great pleasure to the serious reader and much material for intense discussion. Each novel has the equivalent of its own little course, about one month long.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 923 - Children’s Literature

    3 credits
    This course investigates the oral traditions of world literature, which continue to nurture the imagination and sense of identity of children today, and the modern tradition of children’s literature. The course focuses on children’s literature as an introduction to the principles and forms of art and to the rule of the imagination in child development.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 925 - The Uncanny

    3 credits
    This course explores the phenomenon of the uncanny as it has been represented in literature, the graphic arts, and film. Material varies but may include artists from Holbein and Bosch to Poe, Kafka, Lynch, and Hitchcock.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LALL 927 - Detective Film and Fiction

    3 credits
    An examination of the genre known as hard-boiled detective fiction as it developed in literature and then was extended by feature films. Among the authors to be considered are Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and Ross MacDonald; among the films are ‘The Maltese Falcon,’ ‘The Big Sleep,’ and ‘The Long Goodbye.’

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

 

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