Sep 19, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue []

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Liberal Arts - Social Sciences

  
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    LASS 823 - Modern Culture

    3 credits
    An examination of some of the ways in which contemporary society and culture, including the arts and media, are related. For example, which people choose which forms of culture for their use, why do they use them, what effects does the culture have on the people who use them, and what interest does society have in regulating which culture people have access to? The course considers the categories of high and popular culture, the natural of social and cultural hierarchy, the social values transmitted by popular culture and the media, and perspectives on censorship.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 824 - The United States and the World, 1776- Present

    3 credits
    “This course examines American foreign policy and relations from 1776 to the present. Diverse perspectives - ideological, nationalist, realist, humanist - will be brought to bear on issues like America’s “”mission”” in the world, expansion and empire, the World Wars, the Cold War, and the War on the Terror.”

  
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    LASS 831 - Money Matters

    3 credits
    Explores issues in economics and business by working out from the roles and interests of individual agents and groups. We look at economic dynamics in artistic and cultural work in the present, and at different historical moments, to explore further the nature of these relationships and their meanings. Students are exposed to economic and business discourse, provided with a broad and intensive understanding of economic and business language and logic, given experience in the application of these concepts to the issues in their field of interest, and provide a foundation for thinking through the economic and ethical dimensions of their work.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    LASS 836 - Study Abroad: 18th Century London and Bath

    3 credits
    This course complements LAPI 822 Age of Reason, Age of Satire. The 14-day excursion will consider essential aspects of English Enlightenment culture - architecture, collecting and museum building, spa and social life, science, imperial expansion - with site visits to Bath, Greenwich, the British Museum, John Soane’s House, Kenwood House, the Tate Britain, the Wallace Collection, etc. Students will attend twice-weekly lectures, keep a trip journal, and, after our return, submit a substantial paper on Enlightenment England.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 and LACR*210

  
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    LASS 850 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 credits
    An exploration of the nature of human culture, its variations, and the anthropological explanations of these differences ranging from symbolic, functional, to historical. This survey of culture in Western and non-Western societies considers a number of special topics such as: language and society; cultural identity and the arts; gender; religion and cultural change; marriage and family; ethnicity and race; the impact of globalization, tourism, and cultural change.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 852 - Human Evolution

    3 credits
    An introduction to human biological and cultural evolution, a survey of the major evolutionary stages in hominid evolution, an introduction to Paleolithic technologies, and a comparison of contemporary Stone Age societies with Paleolithic populations.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 854 - Analyzing Talk

    3 credits
    This course asks: What can be learned by listening, recording, and analyzing human communication? Much like the interdisciplinary course Observing Humans, Analyzing Talk will involve student-led field work in a location chosen by the student. This is a course primarily about the study of power and culture; the students will be learning about patterned power dynamics through the frameworks of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and age. Speech, para-linguistics, gesture, and posture are the focus as the course introduces classics in sociolinguistics, semiotics, and video ethnography. Like music, drama, and choreography, and visual art, human talk can be analyzed both aesthetically and structurally. Framed by the media available of its time, Analyzing Talk will cover speech and gesture research and will ask how media extends and limits the questions of a particular age. Classics in documentary film will augment the course.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 861 - Folklore

    3 credits
    Folklore is considered the artistic communication of small groups of subcultures. This course emphasizes urban folklore. Each student chooses a subculture and an art genre of an existing community to study. Classes involve the development of interviewing skills, documenting methods, and an understanding of the history of folklore study. Students learn about people’s lives through their songs, tales, movements, and material culture.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 862 - Psychology of Music

    3 credits
    What makes a phenomenon musical? What is musical behavior? Why do people devote valuable cognitive resources to it? Does music have properties with universal (cross-cultural) significance? Can music be said to convey meaning? These and similar questions represent an effort to understand aspects of music seldom if ever addressed through studies of its history, theory, and practice. Moving from causal explanation to cognitive representation and mediated behavior, the course examines the biological origins of music-making, the psychology of aural awareness and perception, the strategies of musical expression, and the construction of meaning in relation to culture.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 871 - Child & Adolescent Psychology

    3 credits
    This course is developmentally oriented and focuses on Erikson’s psychosocial stages of life from birth to adolescence. Major topics include pregnancy, the birth process, and the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the child. Family life and parent-child relationships are also examined, with particular attention given to the impact of our social institutions upon parents and children.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 872 - Adult Psychology

    3 credits
    This course provides an overview of adult stages of psychological development throughout early, middle and late adulthood. An eclectic variety of perspectives citing psychoanalytic, cognitive, and humanistic orientations are considered.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority Enrollment to Dance Education majors and Art Therapy.

  
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    LASS 873 - Personality & Creativity

    3 credits
    Through readings of works of major theorists on the nature of personality and on creativity, the course poses two major questions: What do major theorists have to say about the human personality?; and What do major theorists have to say about what it means to be a creative person? There are a number of ways of answering these questions and it is not the purpose of the course to choose the “”best”” answer, but rather, to put the student in a better position to make his or her own decision.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 874 - Psychology of Touch

    3 credits
    In this course students learn about the role the sense of touch plays in early physical development and in the development of perceptual and cognitive skills. The last part of the course is devoted to the aesthetic dimension of touch and the significance of early tactile stimulation for the visual and performing arts.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 875 - Social Psychology

    3 credits
    A survey of major social problems today and an analysis of society’s resistance to implementing the necessary painful solutions. Students study the current status of major social institutions and their increasing failure to meet and satisfy human needs. Some of the other areas that are studied are mental health and mental illness, human values, love and marriage, dreams, and preventative programs.

    Prerequisites LASS*871 or LASS*872

    Students must have completed the 2nd semester of their Sophomore year (60 credits).

  
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    LASS 876 - Psychology of Creativity

    3 credits
    The course examines the problems involved in defining and attempting to measure creativity. The course is developmentally oriented, focusing on relationships between creativity and normal growth and development, and intelligence and personality. Problems that the artist encounters with productivity are explored, as well as the values of society toward creativity and the artist.

    Prerequisites LASS*871

  
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    LASS 911 - Renaissance and Reformation: 1400-1648

    3 credits
    The intellectual and cultural explosion that heralded the modern era in Western civilization. Political, economic, philosophical, religious, and cultural developments.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 912 - Age of Science & Enlightenment: 1648 - 1815

    3 credits
    The dramatic intellectual revolution of the age of science and the applications of the revolution to every province of the human experience. The Enlightenment and the French Revolution, which are parts of the transformation of Europe, are studied from the perspective of their consequences for the modern world.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 914 - Holocaust

    3 credits
    The Holocaust is a watershed event in modern history. This traumatic episode left indelible marks on Western society, probably for generations to come. It was caused by factors that still exist in the world. This course examines the history that led to the Holocaust, and will attempts to help students understand what happened and what meaning it has for us today.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 922 - Politics and the Media

    3 credits
    This course analyzes how political and social forces interact with the American community and how that interaction affects government structure and policy. Factors such as population profiles, suburbanites, elite groups, public opinion, party organization, elections, and reform movements are studied.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 923 - Sociology of Art

    3 credits
    An examination of the relationships that exist between art and society. The course focuses on the social influences that shape the creation and reception of artistic works. Topics include the social role of the artist; art as a socially organized form of work; the social institutions of artistic production, transmission, and audience reception; and the understanding of art in terms of its social content.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 924 - Sociology of Politics

    3 credits
    This course studies the interaction of political, social, economic, technological, and cultural forces in American society with their resultant impact on the political system. A brief introduction to political science is incorporated early in the semester. Factors such as population profiles, suburbanites, elite groups, party organization, elections, and reform movements are considered.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 925 - Mass Media And The Arts

    3 credits
    The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of mass media and popular culture, primarily in the United States since the 1890s. Various forms of mass media are defined and the shared techniques by which these forms seek to communicate are analyzed. Finally, the values, both aesthetic and social, embodied in both these media and popular culture are examined in relation to social and economic change.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 931 - The City

    3 credits
    A study of the city in history, the forces that shaped its development, and the impact the city has had on history. The American city from the 17th century to the present is used as the model for this study.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 932 - The American Suburbs

    3 credits
    The modern suburb has had a tremendous impact upon the history, culture, politics, and art of American society. In this course we investigate the historical development of the American suburb as well as its modern form. Looking at the suburb as a cultural phenomenon, we explore both the stereotype of the suburbs as well as its more complex reality. We also examine works of fiction, photography, painting, film-making, architecture, and design that have emerged out of this strange and familiar landscape.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 933 - American Society

    3 credits
    The course considers American national identity by examining the unique nature of America’s organizing principles as well as its culture. Basic American values such as equality, individualism, and freedom are explored: where they came from and how they affect American patterns and behavior. American exceptionalism is underlined by the cross-national comparisons with Europe and Canada. The course concludes with a consideration of some contemporary value differences and conflicts within American culture that challenged American national identity and contribute to polarization within the society.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 934 - 1968:The Year That Defined A Generation

    3 credits
    Was 1968 a revolutionary year? This course will examine the course and consequences of 1968 - a year-long crisis halfway between the end of the Second World War (1945) and the end of the Cold War (1991) - for the United States, Europe, and the Soviet Union. From Paris to Berlin, and from Washington to Chicago to San Francisco, mostly young citizens protested against American (“”Tet”“) and Soviet (“”Prague”“) hegemony in Europe, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere, and demanded instead freedom, justice, and self-determination for all people. With this in mind, we will consider such questions as the connection between domestic and international forces; the role of the mass media in shaping the events of 1968; formal and informal activist networks across Europe, across the Atlantic, and across the world; the degree to which ideology (whether real or perceived) united or divided leaders, followers, and spontaneous movements; the diverse meaning of protest and its impact on class, age, gender, and racial relations; and, finally, the role that “”1968”” played in separating Western Europe from the U.S., producing new centers of power across the world, and contributing to the ultimate collapse of the Soviet Empire in 1991.

    Prerequisites LACR*210

    Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    LASS 951 - Islam: Religion & Culture

    3 credits
    This course examines Islamic culture as it is refracted in various religious and literary texts by Muslims from Arabia, Iran (Persia), and India as well as North America. The course begins with discussion of the centrality of prophecy and scripture in Islam, followed by a perusal of Islamic theology and mysticism, and ends with a sampling of primarily literary prose and poetry pieces that provide insights into the multifarious facets of Islamic civilization.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 952 - Afro-American Culture

    3 credits
    A survey of some of the most important Afro-American contributions to American culture, with special attention to the 20th century and to the arts. Among those whose work is discussed are W. E. B. DuBois, Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes, and Paul Robeson.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 953 - Middle Eastern Art and Culture

    3 credits
    This course considers the artistic, socio-cultural, and historic context of contemporary visual, literary, and performing arts from Morocco to Afghanistan. Through an examination of the lives and work of selected contemporary filmmakers, illustrators, writers/poets, musicians and painters, we will touch on the intellectual and artistic traditions underlying their work. Also considered will be how they are affected by issues such as secularism and religious fundamentalism, political struggles, war and exile, women’s rights, and the impact of the West.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 955 - Cultural Ecology

    3 credits
    A review of the various cultural adaptations found in different environments such as deserts, grasslands, circumpolar regions, tropical and temperate forests, islands, and high-altitude and urban areas. These adaptations include hunting and gathering, fishing, and agriculture (shifting, irrigated, and industrial). The attitude toward the environment, population growth, and the use of labor, technology, energy, and other resources are considered.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 972 - Personality & Adjustment

    3 credits
    The study of personality, the patterns of behavior and predispositions that determine how a person perceives, thinks, feels, and acts. The inner life of men and women, the quality of their character, their adjustment to their social milieu, and their potentialities for self-fulfillment are all explored. Special attention is given to adjustment problems of artists in work and in love.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    LASS 973 - Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits
    This course focuses on historical perspectives, casual factors, and treatments for types of mental disorders in adults and children including stress, panic, anxiety, mood, and substance, eating, cognitive and personality disorders. Schizophrenia, mental retardation, autism, and behavioral disorders of childhood are also addressed. Theoretical systems relating to psychopathology including psychodynamic, social theories, cognitive as well as biological influences are explored.

    Prerequisites LASS*871 or LASS*872

    Priority enrollment to Art Therapy concentration.

  
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    LASS 974 - Theories of Personality

    3 credits
    Introduces the study of personality and how patterns of behavior, interaction, perception, and response are understood by a broad variety of theorists. Questions of nature vs. nurture, whether the past impacts the present, and what defines mental health are discussed. Psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, and behavioral approaches are compared and contrasted.

    Prerequisites LASS*871 or LASS*872, and one additional from LASS*871, LASS*872, LASS*873, LASS*874, LASS*875, LASS*972, LASS*973, LASS*876, LASS*975, or MMDI*353

    Priority enrollment to Art Therapy concentration.

  
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    LASS 975 - Educational Psychology

    3 credits
    An introduction to educational psychology for potential educators. The basic principles of learning theory and education are presented and critically examined. Using a psychosocial orientation, the developmental stages of the human life cycle are explored, as well as the needs of a variety of special populations, e.g., those with learning disabilities or physical disabilities. Considerable attention is given to increasing awareness and understanding of communication, group dynamics, and organizational behavior.

    Prerequisites LASS*871 or LASS*872


Master of Industrial Design

  
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    GRID 501 - Business Planning and Practices

    3 credits
    Based on the principles of human-center design, this course introduces students in the arts and media to the principles of business - idea development, marketing, finances, and presentation skills - and develops competencies in strategic thinking problem solving, goal setting, time management, presentation skills, business writing, and financial literacy. Over the course of the semester students research, develop and prototype their ideas forming them into viable ventures. The course also introduces students to the various organizational structures used in business - small and large, start-up and established. The course culminates with public presentations and judging with the best proposals being eligible for a venture grant or participation in a summer incubator program.

    Restricted to Graduate students and Undergraduate Seniors.

  
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    GRID 506 - Cognitive Science of Interaction Design

    3 credits
    The goal of this course is to address complexity of interaction between human beings and designed systems, environments or objects. This includes a wide range of practical applications - from designing or iPhone apps and interactive installations to designing of “”smart clothes”” and neural interfaces. In the first part of the course students will be introduced to basic concepts and vocabulary of the fields of cognitive science and psychology relating to interaction design. The main topics covered in the course will be cognitive science research findings related to information input and processing theory, perception and cognition, information appliances and interface design. In the second part of the course students will apply their knowledge of cognitive science concepts and human-centered design theory to specific projects assigned to them in collaboration with the main design studio and their personal interest.

  
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    GRID 508 - Design Research and Synthesis

    3 credits
    This course is focused on design research as it applies in a human-centered design context. Through readings, presentations, and discussions students learn to distinguish and articulate different research strategies, review methods and ways of making sense of data collected. Making sense of complexity by doing and devising actions based on abductive thinking produce meaningful argument that support decision making and iterative design development. Special emphasis is placed on ethnography, communication theory, and interventions in organizational systems and cultures.

    Restricted to Graduate students and Undergraduate Seniors.

  
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    GRID 603 - Design Studio I

    3 credits
    This studio is structured around collaboration with businesses, for- and not-for-profit organizations and community. Projects focus on organizational development, service design and design for user-experience. Studio teams combine first and second year MID students. As first-year students are introduced to the human-centered design process and methodology, second year students take on the leadership role as team managers and facilitators. There is a strong emphasis on design research and synthesis, clear and highly visual communication, and the prototyping and practice is additionally supported through Design Methods I and II (GRID 604 and 704).

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 604 - Design Methods I

    3 credits
    As a complement to the studio course (GRID 603), this course helps to develop the skills and methods required to realize successful design projects. Put into practice, these “”tools”” enable and support a design process that is increasingly shared with other disciplines, facilitates collective learning, and produces actionable strategies for change. Special emphasis is placed on participant field research, system mapping, the development of design-orientated scenarios and the ability to communicate design thinking and concepts in a clear and compelling way. Content of the coursework comes directly from the studio projects.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 605 - Design Studio II

    3 credits
    This design studio offers the opportunity to launch individual or group design projects that are not connected to the ongoing industry partnerships. Projects are framed through critical issues, connected to the ongoing industry partnerships, and take into consideration personal interests of the individual student. The primary goal of this course is to increasingly strengthen the student’s ability to engage and advance critical issues through demonstrating and testing design concepts that can lead to products, systems and/or services. Students will be able to gauge their personal strengths and weaknesses, and orient/position themselves for the subsequent summer internship.

    Prerequisites GRID*603

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 606 - Design Methods II

    3 credits
    As a complement to the Design Studio II course (GRID 605), this course builds on the introduction to the design process, its tools and methods, to further develop the skills and methods in GRID 604 in the previous semester. The course further develops field research methods and principles (e.g. Universal Design, Human Factors) and refines mapping, modeling and presentation techniques. This course also supports students’ portfolio development and self-promotion in order to secure an appropriate internship for the summer.

    Prerequisites GRID*604

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 611 - Design Seminar: Concepts and Contexts

    3 credits
    A seminar devoted to examining the shift in cultural, technological, material, and professional landscapes that a graduate design candidate must navigate. Through readings, presentations, and discussions, students explore how these evolved contexts are changing the nature of design practice and thinking. Special emphasis is placed on developing key concepts and ideas that inform the work that the students undertake throughout their program. The seminar works in parallel with the studio course; topics and themes covered in the seminar are germane to the studio projects.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 614 - Materials and Processes Seminar

    3 credits
    A writing-intensive course introducing the student to the nature of materials used in industrial products and the various processes by which they are formed. Films, lectures, and field trips familiarize students with wood, metal, and plastic materials as well as processes such as injection molding, laser cutting, and stereolithography. Emphasis is placed on the study of material characteristics and the appropriate use of forming methods. Introduction to technical information, specification writing, and professional communications. Meets with IDES*232. In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate level concepts that will typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GRID 624 - Architectonics

    1.5 credits
    An elective course intended as a multidisciplinary forum for the investigation, appreciation, and design of architectural space, structures, and systems. Using in-class exercises as a laboratory for creative and collaborative exchange, students learn and apply alternative design processes, design vocabulary, user-centered experience, and design. This course develops concepts and analytical studies of objects/spaces through various 2D and 3D drawing/modeling techniques and culminates in an actual built/altered environment. Meets with IDES 371. In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate-level concepts that typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GRID 626 - Team Building

    3 credits
    Through a combination of readings, discussion, and participation in thematic events, as well as the study of their own behavior, students learn about the nature of authority and responsibility, anxiety, communications, the evolution of norms and the underlying assumptions that often govern team development. Students will also learn how a task with a specific deadline and collective responsibility for a product affects team dynamics and is effected by them.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 690 - Graudate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRID 699 - Topics: Industrial Design

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    GRID 703 - Advanced Design Studio

    3 credits
    This studio is structured around collaborations with businesses, for- and not-for-profit organizations and community. Projects focus on organizational development, service design and design for user-experience. Studio teams combine first and second year MID students. As first-year students are introduced to human centered design process and methodology, second year students take on a leadership role as team managers and facilitators. There is a strong emphasis on design research and synthesis, clear and highly visual communication, and the prototyping and iteration of design concepts based on user input and feed-back. The development of design skills and studio practice is additionally supported through Design Methods I and II (GRID604 and GRID704).

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 704 - Advanced Design Methods

    3 credits
    Building on the design methods classes offered during the first year, the laboratory offers a series of tutorials in order to round out students’ particular skill sets. This course will further support professional networking through development of student’s portfolio websites and other outreach projects.

    Prerequisites GRID*606

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 711 - ID Seminar: Professional Development

    3 credits
    A professional seminar that addresses the individual career interests of each degree candidate especially as they relate to the student’s thesis project. The product of this course is the formulation of a career plan and objectives tailored to each candidate, and the further development of a portfolio, resume, and other documentation targeted toward the practical application of the candidate’s knowledge and skill.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 712 - Design Entrepreneurship

    3 credits
    This course will help students to develop the tools that take ideas from inception to business plan, to put their ideas into idioms that make sense to industry, and to create the viable means for connecting new product and service development to sustainable outcomes. This course will explore new business incubation, microbusiness practices, emerging models of design consultancies, and, practices of innovation in a global economy.

  
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    GRID 721 - Masters Thesis Project

    6 credits
    A tutorial providing the opportunity for individual candidates to shape and present the outcome of their programs of study in a manner that directly reflects their career objectives. Projects may be carried out independently, under industry sponsorship, or as part of a research project, based on a plan produced and approved through the thesis director.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 722 - Master’s Thesis Documentation

    3 credits
    A tutorial providing the opportunity for individual candidates to develop and present their thesis in a manner that directly reflects their career objectives. The thesis project and document must exhibit an in-depth exploration of an approved topic, which addresses an area of importance to the Industrial Design field and contributes to the body of knowledge pertaining to that area. It may be carried out under industry sponsorship, as a part of a research project, or be independently based.

    Open to Masters of Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    GRID 795 - Design Internship

    3 credits
    A supervised practicum in a cooperating business, consultancy or design firm. The internship represents full-time employment equivalency under the new mentorship of a professional; it provides practical on-site experience, in which the intern is integrated into the professional staff, assuming professional-level responsibilities and experience. A University professor also observes, advises, and assesses the student during the course of the internship.


Animation

  
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    GRAN 325 - Storyboarding

    3 credits
    The ability to create effective visual continuities represents a fundamental skill in animation and live-action filmmaking. In this class, an understanding of narrative story structure and the ability to translate words into images will be developed through exercises dealing with the specifics of shot sequence design. Storyboards will be expanded into animatic form and will include the creation of basic soundtracks.

  
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    GRAN 332 - 3D II: Modeling and Lighting

    3 credits
    This course is designed to further develop 3D computer animation modeling, texturing, lighting, and rendering skills. Using industry-standard software, students explore and develop 3D skills with both photo-realistic and stylized graphic approaches to image creation and manipulation.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAN 333 - 3D III: Character Animation

    3 credits
    This course is designed to deeply increase students’ 3D computer character animation knowledge. Using industry-standard software, students build character models and skeletons, attach the models to the skeletons, and move the resulting 3D computer characters through a series of exercises as they explore and refine 3D character animation skills.

  
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    MAAN 101 - Freshman Animation

    1.5 credits
    An introduction to the basics of animation, with an emphasis on the development of storytelling capabilities. Inventive studio projects explore production techniques used both in experimental and character animation. In addition, an historical overview is provided through film screenings and group discussion.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    MAAN 201 - Animation Movement Principles

    3 credits
    Through a series of drawn exercises concentrating on timing, movement, and weight, the student acquires an understanding of fundamental animation principles.

    Priority enrollment to Media Arts Majors, Animation Minors, and Multidisciplinary majors.

  
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    MAAN 202 - Object Animation

    3 credits
    Introduces students to under-the-camera animation using varied media, such as puppets, cut-outs, and painting-on-glass. Special attention is given to non-narrative approaches to animation. Students create a final project using one or more of the techniques explored during the semester.

    Priority enrollment to Media Arts Majors, Animation Minors, and Multidisciplinary majors.

  
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    MAAN 211 - Character Design

    3 credits
    Designing characters, backgrounds, pans, and creative camera moves for the animated scene. Design styles and techniques are explored for their potential to develop a wide range of character types, traits, moods, personalities, and attitudes. Students learn to integrate space and characters action, work with camera fields, deal with composition and perspective, and create moods through layout. A final project requires development of an animator’s bible, a production workbook for the student’s personal film portfolio.

    Prerequisites MAAN*201 or MAAN*202

  
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    MAAN 231 - Digital Image Creation and Editing

    3 credits
    This introductory course develops the student’s understanding of digital movement and imaging through animation exercises using a variety of 2D software programs on the PC platform. No previous computer experience is required.

    Priority enrollment to Animation majors.

  
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    MAAN 232 - 2D Motion Graphics and Movement

    3 credits
    Using both raster- and vector-based programs, students explore how to build 2D animation sequences in the computer and how to translate hand-drawn animation into digitally composited animated pieces. Traditional animation principles are expanded upon and reinforced using 2D computer graphics and editing programs. Digital imagery and sound are integrated in class assignments designed to explore a wide variety of 2D styles.

    Prerequisites MAAN*231 or MMDI*102

  
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    MAAN 301 - Collaborative Workshop

    3 credits
    The first half of this course is devoted to the creation of a short, client-based project. The second half involves an interdisciplinary group project aimed at refining students’ knowledge of animation movement design.

    Prerequisites MAAN*201 or MAAN*202

  
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    MAAN 302 - Junior Animation Piece

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the creation of a personal one and half-minute animated piece, starting form initial conception and ending with final output to digital or film media. Stages in the production cycle include storyboarding, animatics, animation, inking and painting, sound-image editing, and final output.

    Prerequisites MAAN*201 or MAAN*202

  
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    MAAN 314 - Sound Design and Technology

    3 credits
    A hands-on exploration of various technical materials and procedures that complement the animator’s production skills, including video editing, analog and digital sound recording, mixing and processing, digital soundtrack preparation, and green screen compositioning techniques.

    Prerequisites MAAN*202

    Open to Animation majors and minors; and Film/Animation majors only.

  
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    MAAN 320 - Selected Topics in Animation

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course allows for the presentation of one-time, unique studio experiences involving either specialized themes, media, classroom structures, or teaching and learning formats, for the development of projects relevant to contemporary Animation issues.

    Restrictions Junior/Senior Preferred Variable Level - Check W/ Dept
  
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    MAAN 321 - Puppet Animation

    3 credits
    The technique of animation handmade three-dimensional characters. Topics include puppet construction in clay and mixed media, set design and construction, and lighting. Students also study the history of puppet animation through screenings and lectures, with special emphasis on European filmmakers and nonverbal storytelling.

    Prerequisites MAAN*201 or MAAN*202

  
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    MAAN 325 - Storyboarding

    3 credits
    The ability to create effective visual continuities represents a fundamental skill in animation and live-action filmmaking. In this class, an understanding of narrative story structure and the ability to translate words into images will be developed through exercises dealing with the specifics of shot sequence design. Storyboards will be expanded into animatic form and will include the creation of basic soundtracks.

    Prerequisites MAAN*201, MAAN*202, MAFL*201, and MAFL*202

  
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    MAAN 331 - 3-D 1: Introduction

    3 credits
    Using industry-standard 3D computer software, students learn basic modeling, texturing, lighting, movement, and rendering techniques. This course prepares students for further 3D computer coursework and allows them to utilize 3D software in the development and creation of their Junior and Senior thesis work.

    Prerequisites MAAN*231 or MMDI*102

  
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    MAAN 332 - 3D II: Modeling and Lighting

    3 credits
    This course is designed to further develop 3D computer animation modeling, texturing, lighting, and rendering skills. Using industry-standard software, students explore and develop 3D skills with both photo-realistic and stylized graphic approaches to image creation and manipulation.

    Prerequisites MAAN*331

  
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    MAAN 333 - 3D III: Character Animation

    3 credits
    This course is designed to deeply increase students’ 3D computer character animation knowledge. Using industry-standard software, students build character models and skeletons, attach the models to the skeletons, and move the resulting 3D computer characters through a series of exercises as they explore and refine 3D character animation skills.

    Prerequisites MAAN*331

  
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    MAAN 341 - History of Animation

    3 credits
    The aesthetics of animation design and the structural elements of frame-by-frame filmmaking have evolved over time. Analytical, procedural, and historical approaches are brought to bear in the study of animation principles and their development in cinematic history.

    Prerequisites MAAN*202

  
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    MAAN 401 - Animation Thesis I

    3 credits
    Directed independent production of a short film project in an idiom of the student’s choosing; additional production of a visual portfolio and reel.

    Prerequisites MAAN*302

  
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    MAAN 402 - Animation Thesis II

    3 credits
    Directed independent production of a short film project in an idiom of the student’s choosing; additional production of a visual portfolio and reel.

    Prerequisites MAAN*401 or MAAN*302


Film

  
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    GRMA 304 - Image and Performance

    3 credits
    For artists and performers of all disciplines. An intensive cross-disciplinary workshop in which the students create their own short performance works using fusions of video, animation, dance, motion, and sound to explore the interactions between visual media and the performing arts.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRMA 443 - Time: A Seminar

    3 credits
    The concept of Time considered from a multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings in philosophy, literature, psychology, sociology, and film theory. Relevant works in film and video are screened. Students are responsible for a final term paper that interrelates two or more of the readings with one of the screened works.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRMA 690 - Graduate Media Arts Ind Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRMA 699 - Topics: Media Arts

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    MACR 121 - The Art of Cinema

    3 credits
    Surveys the artistic possibilities of film and digital video, introducing students to narrative, documentary, experimental, and hybrid approaches to live-action film and animation. The course mixes lecture, discussion, screenings, and basic hands-on work with filmed images using digital-video cameras and editing software.

  
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    MACR 121S - The Art of Cinema - Screening

    0 credits
    Surveys the artistic possibilities of film and digital video, introducing students to narrative, documentary, experimental, and hybrid approaches to live-action film and animation. The course mixes lecture, discussion, screenings, and basic hands-on work with filmed images using digital-video cameras and editing software.

  
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    MACR 304 - Image and Performance

    3 credits
    For artists and performers of all disciplines. An intensive cross-disciplinary workshop in which the students create their own short performance works using fusions of video, animation, dance, motion, and sound to explore the interactions between visual media and the performing arts.

  
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    MACR 304X - Image and Performance

    1.5 credits
    Meets with MACR 304. For artists and performers of all disciplines. An intensive cross-disciplinary workshop in which the students create their own short performance works using fusions of video, animation, dance, motion, and sound to explore the interactions between visual media and the performing arts.

    Open to majors in the College of Performing Arts only.

  
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    MACR 401 - Collaborative Web Series

    3 credits
    A digital-video workshop in which students collaborate to produce a large-scale serial media project for Internet distribution. Students work in groups to write, shoot, post-produce, and upload three or more episodes of a narrative, documentary, reality, or experimental series using live-action filmmaking, animation, or both. Lectures and screenings provide a background in the history and aesthetics of serial media projects, short-form video, and episodic drama. The course encourages participation by students in any major.

  
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    MACR 443 - Time: A Seminar

    3 credits
    The concept of Time considered from a multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings in philosophy, literature, psychology, sociology, and film theory. Relevant works in film and video are screened. Students are responsible for a final term paper that interrelates two or more of the readings with one of the screened works.

    Students must have completed the 2nd semester of their Sophomore year (60 credits).

  
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    MACR 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    MACR 499 - Internship

    3 credits
    Internship program in which the student, working closely with the Media Arts Department internship advisor, is placed in one of several professional situations. Placements include assisting in professional studios, practice in biomedical photography laboratories, and working for commercial and non-profit galleries, among others. Placements in film and animation are sponsored by local independent production houses and television stations, design firms, and freelance artists; students of film may assist in location shooting, set production, editing, casting, scripting, and a myriad of other practical tasks.

    Prerequisites MAPH*202, MAAN*202, or MAFL*202

    Open to Media Arts majors only.

  
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    MACR 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    MAFL 101 - Freshman Film

    1.5 credits
    A short survey of the artistic possibilities of film and video. Topics include elements of narrative, the poetics of film, the documentary idiom and video as an art form. Students write two short papers and work on group shooting projects.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    MAFL 102 - Video: Strategies and Tactics

    3 credits
    Building on the skills and concepts introduced in Time/Motion (FNDP 161), this course introduces the student to the creative and expressive possibilities of film and video. The course surveys a variety of approaches to film from narrative to documentary to experimental, fosters more critical viewing habits, and provides the student with basic production skills in digital video and audio.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111, FNDP*151, FNDP*161, and FNDP*171

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    MAFL 122 - The Art of Sound

    3 credits
    This introductory course investigates the expressive range, communicative power, and aesthetic structure of sound as a form of art. Frequent readings and listening examples demonstrate the ways that sound communicates and enhance students’ awareness of the medium, while practical exercises build up fundamental skills in observation, editing, and mixing.

  
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    MAFL 124 - Video Production

    3 credits
    A hands-on introduction to the principles and techniques of digital-video production. Students develop a sensitivity to the nuances of movement; learn to light, compose, and shoot video; and explore the logic of editing. The course engages students in an analytic consideration of basic cinematic syntax and provides them with the opportunity for individual experimentation and practice.

  
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    MAFL 201 - Cinematography

    3 credits
    This course offers and introduction to the basic principles of cinematography in film and video: lighting, exposure, composition, and color theory. Students learn to shoot and edit 16mm film; perform timing, staging, and blocking exercises to develop a feel for direction; and explore strategies for using camera movement.

    Priority enrollment to Media Arts majors, Film/Dig, minor and Multidisciplinary major. Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman, year (15 credits).

    Restrictions Not Recommended for Foundation
  
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    MAFL 202 - Introduction to Film/Digital Video

    3 credits
    This course offers an introduction to the basic practices of digital video editing and further creative exploration of the art of moving images. Students perform timing, staging, and blocking exercises to develop a feel for direction, experiment with more advanced film strategies, learn to edit digital video, and investigate relationships between sound and image. A final project integrates these explorations creatively.

    Prerequisites MAFL*201

    Priority enrollment to Media Arts majors, Film/Dig minor and Multidisciplinary major.

  
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    MAFL 213 - The Art of Editing

    3 credits
    In this course, students apply critical analysis to the art of editing for motion pictures. Classical and avant-garde editing approaches are explored through selected readings and screenings of seminal works. Students improve and expand their digital-editing capabilities through a series of creative assignments relating to the logic of shot relationships.

    Students must have completed the 2nd semester of their Freshman year.

  
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    MAFL 220 - Writing for the Short Film

    3 credits
    A writing class introducing students to the basic elements of screenwriting. These include three act structure, creating a character, act design, and scene structure. Students complete a short screenplay (5 to 20 pages) by the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites MAFL*201 and MAFL*202

    Open to Film Animation and Film/Digital Video Majors

    Restrictions Not Recommended for Foundation
  
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    MAFL 301 - Junior Production Workshop

    3 credits
    A production course that focuses on independent-filmmaking techniques and concepts. Students explore cinematic ideas through structured and personal filmmaking assignments that emphasize keen visual thinking, story development, and an understanding of film form and language. Students are taught advanced techniques in lighting, shot selection, camera movement, editing, and sound design, using high-end 16mm film and HD video gear. Student also view and analyze significant films.

    Prerequisites MAFL*202

  
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    MAFL 302 - Junior Cinema Production II

    3 credits
    Second part of a year-long film and digital video production class emphasizing independent filmmaking techniques and concepts. Students explore cinematic ideas through structured and personal filmmaking assignments that emphasize keen visual thinking, story development, and an understanding of film form and film language. Students are taught professional lighting, 16mm sync sound camera technologies, editing and soundtrack strategies, and laboratory procedures. Students also view and analyze significant films.

    Prerequisites MAFL*301

    Open to Film/Digital Video majors only.

  
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    MAFL 304 - Sound Design

    3 credits
    Introduces the theory and practice of sound editing and design for motion pictures. Through weekly screenings, selected readings, and analytical assignments, students learn the historical and aesthetic development of film sound. Using nonlinear sound-editing software, students complete exercises in the creative practice of post-production sound acquisition, editing, and mixing for various media.

    Students must have completed the 2nd semester of their Freshman year.

  
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    MAFL 311 - Narrative Production

    3 credits
    Students in this course explore creative sound design in finished films with instruction and practice in the use of 16 mm sync-sound and digital audio recording equipment, and by building and editing multiple synchronous sound tracks. Students work collaboratively in small groups to write, direct, and crew on short films that incorporate the concept of sound design. Particular emphasis is placed on the refinement of directing and crewing skills.

    Prerequisites MAFL*202

 

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