Dec 19, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue []

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Foundation Program

  
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    FNDP 171 - Time Motion

    3 credits
    Building on the concepts and sensibilities of FNDP 151 Two-Dimensional Design Principles and FNDP 161 Three-Dimensional Design/Time Motion, students undertake an expanded exploration of time-based art. Students develop works that explore mechanical and digital animation devices, kinetics, and the cinematic language. Projects that focus on the controlled movement of objects, the positioning of the viewer and the use of sound prepare the students for the development of increasingly complex narrative works. Students experiment with a variety of materials and media.

    Open to Foundation majors only.

  
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    FNDP 490 - Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.


Graduate

  
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    GRAD 652 - Studio and Text

    3 credits
    Focuses on the creation and development of text in the context of the visual arts - from text that generates the visual to text that is an essential part of the work. A concept-generating course, this combines the making of art and a writing workshop. Students may choose to work in any of various visual arts areas, including book arts, picture books, painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography, and multimedia.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GRAD 655 - Graduate Seminar: Visual Culture Studies

    3 credits
    In this graduate seminar we examine the content and evolution of contemporary visual culture - that is everything we see, may see, or visualize and the how we use visual and textual means to communicate, define, and produce our culture and its artifacts. We examine historic origins and changing contexts that underlie and inform a broad range of creative practices including art, design, architecture, cinema, media, display, material culture, digital culture, popular culture, sustainable design, and performance. By addressing concerns for 21st century artists, art educators, industrial designers, museum designers and practitioners, students gain an understanding of the concepts, objects, and practices that comprise contemporary visual culture, and learn how these ideas may be applied to their concurrent graduate research, writing, and studio practice.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAD 656 - Graduate Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Art and Design

    3 credits
    This seminar addresses unique themes and topics proposed by UArts faculty based upon their current research and critical inquiry that are developed in response to the diverse range of CAD graduate program curricula. Students select a topic relevant to the research and studio pursuits being explored in their major discipline thesis.

    Prerequisites GRAD*655

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAD 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAD 750 - University Seminar: Criticism

    3 credits
    An interdisciplinary seminar in which advanced graduate students from various disciplines in the visual arts further examine the nature of image-making with particular attention to the theories and applications of criticism.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GRCR 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRCR 699 - Topics: Crafts

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    GRFA 699 - Topics: Fine Arts

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    GRLA 699 - Topics: Liberal Arts

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    MUED 110 - Brass Instruments

    1 credit
    Students learn basic breathing, embouchure, sound-production, and fingerings for standard band and orchestra brass instruments, appropriate repertoire and pedagogy, and diagnosing typical problems of beginning performers. The performance emphasis is on cornet/trumpet, and horn and trombone, with euphonium and tuba being assigned to brass and bass majors.

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 111 - Flute & Double Reed Instrument

    1 credit
    Students learn basic breathing, embouchure, sound-production, and fingerings for flute, appropriate repertoire and pedagogy, and diagnosis of typical problems of beginning performers. The performance emphasis in this course is on flute, with an introduction to oboe and bassoon.

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 112 - Creative Classroom Musicianship

    1 credit
    This course focuses on learning to play the guitar for use in general music classroom and ensemble accompaniment settings. Students will learn basic chords, progressions, and the ability to accompany and sing varied songs in general music and ensemble settings. Students will also learn about creative and alternative methods of engaging groups of students in musical expression and production.

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 113 - Percussion Instruments

    1 credit
    Students learn basic drum performing techniques and an overview of all pitched and non-pitched standard band and orchestra percussion section instruments, appropriate repertoire and pedagogy, and diagnosis of typical problems of beginning performers. The performance emphasis of this course is on drum set, with timpani and mallet percussion being assigned to percussion majors.

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 114 - Single Reed Instruments

    1 credit
    Students learn basic breathing, embouchure, sound-production, and fingerings for standard band and orchestra woodwind instruments, appropriate repertoire and pedagogy, and diagnosis of typical problems of beginning performers. The performance emphasis in this course is on clarinet and saxophone.

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 115 - String Instruments

    1 credit
    Students learn basic bowing techniques, hand positions, and fingerings for standard orchestral instruments, appropriate repertoire and pedagogy, and diagnosis of typical problems of beginning performers. The performance emphasis of this course is on violin and electric bass, with viola and cello being assigned to bass majors.

    Prerequisites MUSC*102

    Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 320 - Music Pedagogy I - Private Lessons

    1 credit
    Pedagogical and practical aspects relative to teaching private lessons. Students study the components of lessons, various pedagogical approaches, the interpersonal nature of private instruction, repertoire selection, diagnosis of problems, and administrative issues that are part of both private lessons and developing and managing a studio.

    Prerequisites MULS*212, MULS*222, or MULS*232

  
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    MUED 321 - Music Pedagogy II - Improvisation

    1 credit
    The pedagogy of teaching improvisation to students of all ages, including an evaluation of literature available for various levels of difficulty.

    Prerequisites MULS*212, MULS*222, or MUSC*232

  
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    MUED 400 - Psychology of Music Teaching & Learning

    3 credits
    This course covers major theories and developments associated with music cognition and child development in physical, emotional, and psychological terms; and principles supported by psychological observation and investigation that appear to possess import for the teaching/learning endeavor in music. Emphasis is placed on the application of learning theories to practical considerations of teaching, including motivation, learning sequence, student-teacher interaction, and classroom management. Developmental theories, like those of Piaget and Erikson, and current research in cognitive science, are explored with attention to selecting learning experiences in the music and art classrooms.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    MUED 401 - Music and Special Children

    3 credits
    This course consists of readings, discussions, guest speakers, classroom observations, and simulated teaching to help students define and examine various types of disabilities; develop a background on special education practices and laws in America; develop an appreciation of the needs of handicapped persons in general society, in education, and in music education; and guide music education students in developing goals and objectives, adapting lessons and preparing meaningful lesson plans for special students in the music classroom. Participation in class discussion based on assigned reading, a written/verbal presentation on a specific disability, field observations, and two written examinations provide the basis for evaluating student achievement.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    MUED 430 - Rehearsal Techniques - Jazz Ensemble

    2 credits
    Appropriate rehearsal techniques are studies along with rehearsal planning, score study and analysis, repertoire evaluation, selection, interpretation and preparation, performance aspects such as tuning, balancing, phrasing, and teaching improvisation in the rehearsal setting. Special topics include starting and building jazz programs, and jazz for younger students.

    Prerequisites MULS*222, MULS*212, or MULS*232

  
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    MUED 431 - Basic Conducting

    2 credits
    An introduction to a basic repertoire of conducting patterns and gestures, providing students with a hands-on laboratory conducting experience, and giving them opportunities to utilize their music theory analytical and aural skills. Through lectures, laboratory activities, and assignments, students are introduced to the technical skills used in conducting, are provided with opportunities to explore and implement them, and develop assessment strategies to improve their conducting.

    Prerequisites MUSC*204 and MUSC*206

  
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    MUED 520 - Music Pedagogy III: Pre-K to Grade 4

    3 credits
    Study of pedagogical issues and approaches for music instruction in classroom music settings for children from pre-kindergarten through grade 4. Topics include goal setting and lesson planning, selection of age-appropriate materials and methods, and assessment of learning.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 521 - Music Pedagogy IV: Grades 5 to 8

    2 credits
    Study of pedagogical issues and approaches for music instruction in classroom music in grades 5-8. Topics include goal setting and lesson planning, selection of age-appropriate materials and methods, and assessment of learning, as well as the development of advanced skills in functional piano, and writing/arranging for classroom ensembles. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of technology (i.e., Smart Music, Yamaha MIS etc.) and social instruments in the music classroom. This is a TI:ME Level II course.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 522 - Music Pedagogy V: Grades 9 - 12

    2 credits
    Study of pedagogical issues and approaches for music instruction in classroom music in grades 9-12. Topics include goal setting and lesson planning, selection of age-appropriate materials and methods, and assessment of learning. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of technology (i.e., Finale, etc.) in the music classroom and teaching composition and music theory at the secondary school level, as well as digital/audio recording. This is a TI:ME Level II course.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 523 - Music Pedagogy VI Vocal/Choral

    2 credits
    Study of pedagogical issues and approaches for music instruction in vocal/choral music. Topics include voice theory, vocal production, teaching methods, and instructional materials in K-12 settings. The physiology of the voice is studied with reference to principles of choral singing. Special problems of the child and adolescent are considered.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 530 - Alternative Ensembles Elementary and Middle School Ensembles

    2 credits
    Students develop performance and rehearsal skills in alternative ensembles for use in school such as bucket drums, hand bells, samba percussion, and steel pans. Two to three ensembles are covered in any given semester. Age-appropriate rehearsal techniques are emphasized, along with rehearsal planning, appropriate repertoire, equipment selection, and maintenance, and composing and arranging for such ensembles.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 540 - Student Teaching - Elementary

    4 credits
    Taken in a cooperating school, the internship represents full-time employment equivalency under the mentorship of a certified music teacher. It is intended to provide the practical experience in which the intern is integrated into the program, assuming professional-level responsibilities and experiences. A university supervisor observes, advises, and facilitates the relationship between mentor and intern, and assesses the student during the internship.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 541 - Student Teaching Seminar - Elementary

    1 credit
    Discussion and analysis of field experiences, special workshops and field trips. Continuing development and refinement of skills in reflective practice is emphasized as well as the needs of special learners.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 542 - Student Teaching Secondary

    4 credits
    Taken in a cooperating school, the internship represents full-time employment equivalency under the mentorship of a certified music teacher. It is intended to provide practical experience in which the intern is integrated into the program, assuming professional-level responsibilities and experiences. A university supervisor observes, advises, and facilitates the relationship between the mentor and intern, and assesses the student during the internship.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 543 - Student Teaching Seminar: Secondary

    1 credit
    Discussion and analysis of field experiences, special workshops, and field trips. Continuing development and refinement of skills in reflective practice is emphasized as well as certification, job searching, career development, and instrument repair.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 600 - Historical Foundations of Music Education

    3 credits
    An intensive reading course in the history of educational thought and practices in music education in the United States from the Colonial Period to modern times. Students develop a basic understanding of the historical roots of Music Education in America and various movements, philosophies, and events that have had an impact on it. These movements and philosophies are analyzed in terms of their impact and effectiveness and why some have succeeded where others failed. An analysis of ideas and events reveal historical cycles, socio-political ramifications, and periodic reintroduction/revision of previous ideas and approaches. Current trends in American music education are analyzed though the use of historical perspective. Students also develop basic historical research and reporting skills.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 601 - Philosophical Foundations Of Music Education

    3 credits
    An intensive reading course in the philosophical basis of music education. Emphasis is placed on how one’s philosophic perspective informs and molds praxis with particular application to the curriculum and instruction in school music. The course moves chronologically from the roots of philosophy in Ancient Greece to today, but most emphasis is placed on 20th and 21st century thought and movements in American education. Students develop a basic understanding of the philosophical perspectives of Music Education in America and various movements, philosophies, and events that have had an impact on it. Students become familiar with the basic schools and terminology of philosophy needed to be able to think about and discuss philosophical issues in music, education, and music education. Current trends in American music education are analyzed from a philosophical perspective. Students develop basic philosophical research and reporting skills.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 602 - Sociological Foundations of Music Education

    3 credits
    An intensive reading, research, and discussion course in the sociology of music education’s role in society. Students develop a basic understanding of the sociological functioning of music in society and how education in music should, but often does not, meet the greater society’s needs. Socialization in performing groups, group identity, and sociology of schools is studied. Current trends in US music education will be analyzed from a sociological perspective. Students will also develop basic sociological research and reporting skills. This course may be offered on-line.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs. Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 603 - Curriculum and Assessment in Music Education

    3 credits
    The course covers the development, writing, and evaluation of curriculum as a dynamic interactive process based on research. Students develop curriculum writing and evaluation skills through critical review of various curricula, analyses of curriculum models, and developing their own curricula. Measurement and assessment of learning, which is the crucial dynamic element in curricula, is covered in depth. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to critically analyze curricula, design curricula, and develop appropriate assessment tools for various music learning situations.

    Open to Masters in Teaching in Music Education only.

  
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    MUED 605 - Historical and Philosophical Foundations In Music Education

    3 credits
    This is an intensive course of study of the historical and philosophical foundations of music education. This course will encapsulate both the history of music education in the United States from the Colonial period to modern times, and a philosophical emphasis on twentieth and twenty-first century thought and movements in American music education. These movements and philosophies will be analyzed in terms of their impact and effectiveness and why some have succeeded where others failed. An analysis and synthesis of ideas and events will reveal historical cycles, socio-political ramifications, and periodic reintroduction/revision of previous approaches. Current trends in American music education will be analyzed from both historical and philosophical perspectives, while making evident to learners the connections of philosophical theories and theorists, and their significance through the history of music education.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs. Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 606 - Intergration of Technology in Music Education

    3 credits
    This course provides intensive study for learning computer programs that support the music education classroom and for understanding the effective means to authentically integrate technology in K-12 music education. This course will be based upon the seven areas of music technology developed by the Technology Institute for Music Educators (TI:ME), the National Education Technology Standards developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and supported by the National Conference (MENC). The purpose of this course is to provide tools and resources to students that will enable them to become active agents in the growth of their technological skills that are needed to support learning in 21st century classrooms.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs. Open to majors in the School of Music only.

  
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    MUED 610 - Vsm Curricular Dev. and Plan

    2 - 3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. Go to www.villanova.edu/studentlife/music/summerstudies/ for course descriptions and campus information.

  
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    MUED 620 - VSM Music Skills & Techniques

    2 - 3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. Go to www.villanova.edu/studentlife/music/summerstudies/ for course descriptions and campus information.

  
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    MUED 630 - VSM Technology in Music Ed:

    2 - 3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. Go to www.villanova.edu/studentlife/music/summerstudies/ for course descriptions and campus information.

  
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    MUED 641 - VSM Orff Certification Level 1

    3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. The Orff Certification Courses above are part of the American Orff-Schulwerk (AOSA) approved certification course program. Pedagogy skills for teaching basic Orff Schulwerk will be explored and discussed through the use of Music For Children, Murray Volume I and pentatonic folk song material, movement and recorder. Level I teachers will actively learn to use speech, rhymes, poetry, playing pitched and unpitched percussion as well as singing, playing, and improvising in pentatonic for creating an active music curriculum in the school setting. Soprano Recorder pedagogy and skills, creating student-friendly compositions in an elemental style, and models for improvisation will be developed.

  
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    MUED 642 - VSM Orff Certification Level 2

    3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. The Orff Certification Courses above are part of the American Orff-Schulwerk (AOSA) approved certification course program. Level II will be a continuation and refinement of Level I content and will explore the aspects of complex rhythms and meter, movement accompaniment, transposed pentatonic, hexatonic, and other modal melodies including: Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian, Ionian, Lydian and Mixolydian. Movement: form-based choreography and traditional folk dance will be used. The alto recorder will be used throughout and the wider ranges of the soprano recorder will be explored, with an emphasis on modal repertoire and improvisation. Music For Children Murray Volumes II & IV will be the foundation of the course.

    Prerequisites MUED*641

  
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    MUED 643 - VSM Orff Certification Level 3

    3 credits
    Course offered at Villanova Summer Music Program. The Orff Certification Courses above are part of the American Orff-Schulwerk (AOSA) approved certification program. Level III: This course will focus on pedagogy of more complex music from Music for Children Volumes III & V as well as eclectic folk music and more complex musical elements, including syncopation, meter, permutations of 16th notes, melody, theme and variation, chaconne, irregular speech/poetry and iconic notation, with an emphasis on improvisation and drama. Recorder studies will explore a wide range of music, including Schulwerk source materials, traditional folk music, and historical and modern repertoire. Movement classes will include a more detailed study of Laban’s movement efforts, folk dances in complex meter, and more complex choreography synthesizing all dance elements studied thus far.

    Prerequisites MUED*642

  
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    MUED 780 - Thesis/Project Development: Music Education

    3 credits
    The Music Education Thesis is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation.

  
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    MUED 781 - Thesis: Music Education

    3 credits
    The Music Education Thesis is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education, and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation.

    Prerequisites MUED*780

  
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    MUED 785 - Project: Music Education

    3 credits
    The Music Education Project is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education, and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation.

  
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    MUSC 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    THEA 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.


Graduate - Book Arts/Printmaking

  
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    GRPR 302 - Printmaking Workshop

    1.5 credits
    An investigation into the combination of previously studied printmaking media including, but not confined to: relief, intaglio, screenprinting, lithography, and photo & digital imaging. Students are encouraged to investigate unorthodox uses of materials and techniques through the creation of two-dimensional and three-dimensional work.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 304 - Book Arts: Concept and Structure

    3 credits
    An opportunity to explore the integration of type and relief image in unique and editioned book structures. Hands-on experience in dealing with composition (metal) type and computer typesetting is on an intermediate level. Relief printing, photopolymer plates, color reduction printing, and related traditional and contemporary methods of multiple image making are pursued. Special emphasis on development of a personal visual language.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 305 - Lithography

    3 credits
    All of the basic techniques of drawing, imagemaking and printing skills that are necessary to produce hand-pulled lithographs from stones and plates are taught. An emphasis is placed on visual expression and development of ideas through group discussions and critiques.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 314 - Advanced Non-Silver

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Opportunity for continued development of images and skills in combinations of non-silver processes. Introduction of palladium printing and the use of the Scitex Image Setter in the Imaging Lab.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 321 - Advanced Lithography

    3 credits
    Students will further investigate and develop image-making, through lithography. In this course students will be encouraged to use lithography in dynamic and unexpected ways. Students at this advanced level in fine arts should expect to focus attention on concept, content, and formal concerns and to research historic and contemporary litho prints and practices. The skills learned will include, large format stone printing, multicolor separation and registration, and offset litho techniques. They will have the opportunity to perfect their technical skills thereby producing printed works of greater scope and complexity consistent with their interests and experience.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 323 - Intro to Offset Lithography

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students are offered a hands-on course that develops skills in image preparation and printing techniques using offset lithography. An emphasis is placed on personal imagery where both hand-drawn and photographic methods of image making are investigated.

  
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    GRPR 324 - Advanced Offset Lithography

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students have the opportunity for a continued investigation of offset lithography with advanced projects.

  
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    GRPR 325 - Book Arts: Structures

    1.5 credits
    Historical book forms serve as models and as a departure point for innovative new work. Among the new structures presented are accordion bindings and variations, pop-ups, carousel books, tunnel books, and box structures. Students are encouraged to explore new applications and to experiment by combining images and text with book structures. Prior bookbinding experience is suggested. May serve as a follow-up course for FAPR 233. Priority enrollment to Printmaking majors and Book Arts minors.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 434 - Book Production

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This advanced course focuses on the development and production of a printed book or portfolio of works: design and formatting of a publication including the investigation of sequence, page design, and binding possibilities; hands-on experience in the preparation of images for press production, pre-press techniques; and assisting the Master Printer in the printing. All work is produced in the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts, the University’s offset lithography facility. Students may choose to collaborate on projects or work independently.

  
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    GRPR 481 - Collaborative Printmaking

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Students will be involved in the business, technology, and experience of printing limited editions for faculty, other students, or professional artists. During this process they will work with the artist in preparing the idea, then proofing and printing the edition. Advanced students only; they must demonstrate mark-making and editioning abilities.

  
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    GRPR 500 - Papermaking Studio

    3 credits
    A studio course based on in-depth involvement with handmade paper as a creative medium within three major area of emphasis; fiber preparation and sheet production techniques, 3D investigations, and pulp painting techniques. Digital slide lectures and demonstrations on Western and Japanese pulp preparation, sheet formation, and pressing and drying techniques are presented. Students create paper and images using a variety of handmade pulps and fibers. Book structures unique to the handmade paper process and the creation of the unique papers specifically for prints and books are presented.

  
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    GRPR 601 - Colloquium: Text & Image

    1.5 credits
    The focus is on the development of the student’s sensitivity to language and verbal constructs and an understanding of the relation of text to image and structure. The course also supports the development of the student’s creative writing, in particular in the context of artists’ books.

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 602 - Colloquium: History of the Book

    1.5 credits
    Hands-on study of rare books and manuscripts form antiquity to the present, with discussions dealing with their structural, historical, and artistic significance. The class meets at the Library Company of Philadelphia, with field trips to local special collections.

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 603 - Colloquium: the Artist’s Book

    1.5 credits
    An introduction to the history of the artist’s book and an investigation into the artist’s book as a complex art form. Classes consist of discussion of readings and the examination of artists’ books in the Special Collections of various libraries and cultural institutions.

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 611 - Book Arts Studio: Color/Mark

    3 credits
    Personal imagery is investigated through various printmaking and drawing techniques.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GRPR 616 - Book Arts Studio: Concept, Image, Type

    6 credits
    “Introduction to practical and conceptual concerns intrinsic to the production of books and prints. Emphasis is on both print processes, including hands-on experience with letterpress, lithography (plate and offset), and digital printmaking, and conceptual/production processes, including creating dummies and pre-press work. Conceptual explorations further the development of the student’s visual language.”

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 617 - Books Arts Studio: Projects

    6 credits
    Building on what has been learned in the previous semester, students continue to develop their skills and techniques and explore their particular interests in the creation of several works.

    Prerequisites GRPR*611

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 621 - Bookbinding

    1.5 credits
    Basic book structures are explored in the first semester with emphasis on sound conservation techniques and good craftsmanship.

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

    Restrictions Experience Required- See Dept.
  
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    GRPR 622 - Bookbinding

    1.5 credits
    Historic book structures serve as models and departure points for innovative bindings.

    Prerequisites GRPR*621

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 632 - Non-Toxic Printmaking Methods

    1.5 - 3 credits
    Introduction to a range of printmaking media using nontoxic processes and materials. Designed for graduate students who are experienced artists with an understanding of their personal imagery and approach to visual expression, but who are not necessarily proficient printmakers. Students are offered a number of solutions to working in the studio, solvent and acid free. Topics covered include intaglio (using water process photographic plates), drypoint, relief, collograph, monotype, and screen-printing.

  
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    GRPR 633 - Digital Printmaking

    3 credits
    An opportunity for continued investigation within the various printmaking processes. Photoshop is introduced and emphasis is on the use of the computer as an image-making tool within the context of printmaking, and the integration of idea and process. Meets with FAPR 411. In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate-level concepts that typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Open to graduate students in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

    Restrictions Computer Literacy Required
  
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    GRPR 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPR 695 - Graduate Book Arts Internship

    1.5 - 4.5 credits
    A supervised practicum, working with practicing artists, with non-profit arts organizations, in print shops, and in book and paper conservation laboratories. Students gain knowledge of the field and hands-on experience in a variety of professional settings. One goal of the internship is to assist them in testing and expanding their professional skills and knowledge and help them make informed career decisions.

  
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    GRPR 699 - Topics: Printmaking

    1.5 - 6 credits
  
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    GRPR 701 - Colloquium: Professional Practices

    1.5 credits
    Professional practices and issues related to the fields of printmaking and book and publication arts are explored through discussions, lectures, and field trips in the first semester.

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 702 - Colloquium: Professional Practices

    1.5 credits
    Professional practices and issues related to the fields of printmaking and book and publication arts are explored through discussions, lectures, and field trips in the first semester. In the second semester the course focuses on the completion of the student’s professional portfolio.

    Prerequisites GRPR*701

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 721 - Bookbinding

    1.5 credits
    Continued investigation of the book structure at an advanced technical level. Individual attention to developing creative solutions to support book content starts in the first semester.

    Prerequisites GRPR*622

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 722 - Bookbinding

    1.5 credits
    Through critiques and individual instruction, the second semester of this investigation into book structure is devoted to developing structures that support thesis work.

    Prerequisites GRPR*721

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 785 - Thesis Studio I

    6 credits
    In conjunction with the faculty advisor, the MFA candidate develops an individual course of study and defines the projects, in preparation for the required Thesis Exhibition during the final semester.

    Prerequisites GRPR*617

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.

  
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    GRPR 786 - Thesis Studio II

    6 credits
    The planning and execution of a mature body of work to be prepared for thesis exhibition at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites GRPR*785

    Open to graduate Book Arts majors only.


Studio Arts - Ceramics

  
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    GRCR 611 - Major Studio I/Ceramics

    6 credits
    Evaluation of the student’s artistic involvement, projecting and testing options for the direction of the student’s graduate work.

    Open to graduate Ceramics majors only.

  
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    GRCR 612 - Major Studio II/Ceramics

    6 credits
    Further exploration of options, with increased awareness of theoretical issues and personal vision. Greater focus on the student’s work, with a view to completing the repertoire of skills and expression in the medium needed to undertake a thesis project.

    Prerequisites GRCR*611

    Open to graduate Ceramics majors only.

  
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    GRCR 660 - Ceramics

    1.5 credits
    Through lecture and demonstration, students learn basic skills such as handbuilding, throwing, and press molding with an introduction to loading and firing kilns. Mixing clay, slips, and glazes is also covered. Meets with CRCM 220. In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate-level concepts that typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs. Not open to graduate Ceramics majors.

  
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    GRCR 711 - Major Studio III/Ceramics

    6 credits
    Planning and initiation of a sustained body of mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibition following the thesis exhibition semester.

    Prerequisites GRCR*612

    Open to graduate Ceramics majors only.


Graduate - Fine Arts

  
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    GRFA 611 - Independent Studio I

    3 credits
    Intended to assist students in establishing independent production in their major discipline while acquiring the ability to integrate studio production with the demands of off-campus life. At the conclusion of Summer I, the student and faculty mentor agree on a plan of work to be pursued during the off-campus semester, which is a continuation of work begun in the summer. The students are required to propose a direction for their investigations and have access to off-campus studio space in which to carry out the proposal. Enrollment in the Independent Studio requires a commitment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of studio activity per week during the 15-week off-campus semester. The studio mentor meets with the student five times during the semester at regular intervals, reviewing the student’s progress for a 1/2 hour session. The meetings take place at an agreed upon location (usually the student or mentors studio, or school). The last meeting is the final critique of the semester, which takes place at the Winter Critique held at the University.

    Prerequisites GRCR*611, GRPT*611, or GRSC*611

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 612 - Independent Studio II

    3 credits
    Intended to assist students in establishing independent production in their major discipline while acquiring the ability to integrate studio production with the demands of off-campus life. At the conclusion of Winter Critique I, the student and faculty mentor agree on a plan of work to be pursued during the off-campus semester, which is a continuation of work begun in the previous semester. The students are required to propose a direction for their investigations and have access to off-campus studio space in which to carry out the proposal. Enrollment in the Independent Studio requires a commitment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of studio activity per week during the 15-week off-campus semester. The studio mentor meets with the student five times during the semester at regular intervals, reviewing the student’s progress. Meetings take place at an agreed upon location (usually either the student or mentor’s studio or at school). The last meeting is the final critique of the semester, which takes place at the Spring Critique held at the University.

    Prerequisites GRFA*611

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 613 - Graduate Drawing

    3 credits
    Advanced studio develops and expands the student’s visual language and skills while challenging their conceptual approach to drawing by examining and applying the use of materials and methods having historic and cultural origins.

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 614 - Studio Topics:

    3 credits
    This course brings together students from each of the major disciplines to explore studio issues common to all visual arts.

    Prerequisites GRFA*613

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 621 - Independent Writing Project I

    1.5 credits
    The Independent Writing Project is a corequisite of the Independent Studio I and II, and is intended to inform the student’s ongoing Independent Studio investigations undertaken during the fall and spring off-campus semesters. The student proposes an area of research intended as a continued examination of topics introduced during the previous summer seminars, Structure and Metaphor or Art and Society. The student is encouraged to explore through writing the range of issues emanating from seminar reading and discussion and the relationship of these external influences to the development of themes and directions being explored in the studio work.

    Prerequisites GRAD*655 or GRAD*656

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 622 - Independent Writing Project II

    1.5 credits
    The Independent Writing Project is a corequisite of the Independent Studio I and II, and is intended to inform the student’s ongoing Independent Studio investigations undertaken during the fall and spring off-campus semesters. The student proposes an area of research intended as a continued examination of topics introduced during the previous summer seminars, Structure and Metaphor or Art and Society. The student is encouraged to explore through writing the range of issues emanating from seminar reading and discussion and the relationship of these external influences to the development of themes and directions being explored in the studio work.

    Prerequisites GRFA*621

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRFA 740 - Professional Practices

    3 credits
    This course is designed to familiarize students with methods, practices, and professional standards in preparation for the Thesis Exhibition and eventual entry into the visual arts professions.

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 781 - Thesis Writing Project I

    1.5 credits
    The Thesis Writing Project is a corequisite of Thesis Preparation I, and takes place during the fall off-campus semester. Research for the Thesis Writing Project is intended to inform the student’s second-year Independent Studio activity, which focuses on identifying and developing potential directions for the thesis exhibition and written thesis. The student is expected to consider issues raised during the previous summer’s seminar that are particularly relevant to the more focused direction of their studio work. The student independently formulates a proposal and bibliography for a formal paper to be based upon the more developed direction of their work. The range of issues considered for further investigation may include aesthetic, conceptual, technical, or visual culture issues as well as the relationship of the major work to other disciplines.

    Prerequisites GRFA*622

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 782 - Thesis Writing Project II

    1.5 credits
    The Thesis Writing Project is a corequisite of Thesis Preparation II, and takes place during the spring off-campus semesters. Research for the Thesis Writing Project is intended to inform the student’s second-year Independent Studio activity, which focuses on identifying and developing potential directions for the thesis exhibition and written thesis. The student is expected to consider issues raised during the previous summer’s seminar that are particularly relevant to the more focused direction of their studio work. The student independently formulates a proposal and bibliography for a formal paper to be based upon the more developed direction of their work. The range of issues considered for further investigation may include aesthetic, conceptual, technical, or visual culture issues as well as the relationship of the major work to other disciplines.

    Prerequisites GRFA*781

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 783 - Thesis Preparation I

    3 credits
    Following the successful completion of Summer II and the MFA Candidacy Review, the student is declared a thesis candidate by the graduate faculty. They begin independently producing a body of work intended for eventual presentation in a thesis exhibition following the successful completion of Summer III. In consultation with their studio mentor, the student submits Thesis Preparation Plan I, identifying and describing a direction of investigation to be undertaken during the fall semester. The student is expected to identify specific issues to be addressed: intended focus of the work, considerations of technique, materials, scale, location, etc. The student must propose a personal timetable for accomplishing the thesis and identify the sources that will be used in preparation for the exhibition. Enrollment in Thesis Preparation I requires a commitment of 150 hours, equivalent to 10 hours of studio activity per week during the 15-week, off-campus semester.

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 784 - Thesis Preparation II

    3 credits
    In consultation with the studio mentor, thesis candidates propose further development of directions begun in studio work the previous semester by submitting Thesis Preparation Plan II for the spring semester to the mentor.

    Prerequisites GRFA*783

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.

  
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    GRFA 785 - MFA Thesis Exhibition

    6 credits
    The MFA degree certifies that the artist has attained a high level of competence and independent judgment in the discipline and is qualified to stand with his/her mentors as a master artist. The thesis exhibition and accompanying written statement are intended to serve as a demonstration of this mastery. During the final semester, criticism-based research is undertaken as a continuation of the summer seminar in Criticism and is intended to assist the MFA candidate in completing the written component of the thesis requirements.

    Prerequisites GRCR*711, GRPT*711, or GRSC*711

    Open to majors in the MFA Studio Art program only.


Graduate - Liberal Arts

  
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    GRLA 631 - American Art Since 1945

    3 credits
    (See course description under LAAH 831.) In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate-level concepts that typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRLA 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.


Studio Arts - Painting

  
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    GRPT 301 - Junior Painting

    3 credits
    Students maintain individual spaces in the Junior Studio where they can develop a more professional working routine. They are expected to show increasing personal initiative and direction. Regular critiques on both an individual and group basis connect the student to the values of the past and the present, stimulate interest in the major questions of our time, and provide resources for progress. This course embraces a plurality of ideas about painting and, linked with the goals of FACR 301, advocates a spirit of experimentation and research.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 302 - Junior Painting

    3 credits
    Continuation of FAPT 301.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

 

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