May 25, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Studio Arts - Painting

  
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    GRPT 303 - Color Studies

    1.5 credits
    Studio group projects and independent projects consider the purposes and effects of color organization, color perception, and color theory. Color is approached as emotive, symbolic, descriptive, and structural.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 307 - Junior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    This course will be a continuation of information and experiences encountered in FAPT 211: Drawing Form and Space and the introduction of more sophisticated concepts in pictorial art. Drawing will be considered as a preparatory form-making act in the painting process and as expression in its own right.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 308 - Junior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    This course will be a continuation of information and experiences encountered in FAPT 211: Drawing Form and Space and the introduction of more sophisticated concepts in pictorial art. Drawing will be considered as a preparatory form-making act in the painting process and as expression in its own right.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 403 - Drawing References

    1.5 credits
    Advanced drawing projects focus on the relation between a given work and its references and resources. Emphasis is on understanding the nature of references or resource material and the manner in which references or resources influence the outcome of a work. This studio/critique course aims at enhancing students’ ability to connect their personal and subjective interests to the larger context of nature, history, and culture.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 404 - Drawing References

    1.5 credits
    Continuation of FAPT 403.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 411 - Senior Drawing

    1.5 credits
    Advanced drawing, specialized projects.

  
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    GRPT 611 - Major Studio I/Painting

    6 credits
    Evaluation of the student’s artistic involvement, projecting and testing options for the direction of the student’s graduate work.

    Open to graduate Painting majors only.

  
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    GRPT 612 - Major Studio II/Painting

    6 credits
    Evaluation of the student’s artistic involvement, projecting and testing options for the direction of the student’s graduate work.

    Prerequisites GRPT*611

    Open to graduate Painting majors only.

  
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    GRPT 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRPT 699 - Topics: Painting

    1.5 - 6 credits
  
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    GRPT 711 - Major Studio III/Painting

    6 credits
    Planning and initiation of a sustained body of mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibition following the thesis exhibition semester.

    Prerequisites GRPT*612

    Open to graduate Painting majors only.


Studio Arts - Sculpture

  
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    GRSC 331 - Carving

    1.5 credits
    Introduces the student to carving, one of the basic methods of forming sculpture. Students learn to prepare, maintain, and use the tools of the carver. They are introduced to the characteristics of suitable carving materials. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of the formal and expressive potentials of carved sculpture.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 363 - Medallic Sculpture

    1.5 credits
    The Medallic Arts have a long history beginning with monetary coins in the ancient world, developing through Renaissance medals into a vital and international art form that now includes small free-standing sculpture. The link between all of these is not only size, but the need for the work to have a specific communicative function, while at the same time exploring the contemporary sculptural issues. This is a studio course with a lecture component to give the student a history of the discipline. Projects are designed to challenge the student conceptually and to introduce forms and techniques such as bas relief, carving, mold making casting and fabricating, all on a small scale. There will be annual opportunities to exhibit the finished sculpture internationally.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 364 - Installation and Performance

    3 credits
    This course explores the concepts and practice of installation and performance art and their development during the past century. Four primary aspects of Installation are explored: the multisensory immersive environment; the site-specific work; work responsive to the history, usage, or natural aspects of a particular site or location; interactivity or installations in which the audience is encouraged to participate; and the performance art ranging from theatrical situations through the private acts of the artist that explore particular behavioral, experiential, or social issues and is documented through photos, videos, etc. The history of installation and performance work is discussed through a series of lectures and video presentations that examine the art historical, social, cultural, and psychological concerns from which these art forms are derived. Students are expected to be resourceful and inventive when realizing their work.

  
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    GRSC 411 - Advanced Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    For students seriously involved with the figure, this course provides an atelier to continue figure modeling on increasingly advanced levels and a context to help formulate a personal figurative sculptural idiom. Works are sculptured at various scales, including life size, and independent projects are undertaken in consultation with the faculty. Critiques involving the meaning and sculptural significance of the works are an integral part of the ongoing class activity.

  
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    GRSC 412 - Advanced Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    For students seriously involved with the figure, this course provides an atelier to continue figure modeling on increasingly advanced levels and a context to help formulate a personal figurative sculptural idiom. Works are sculptured at various scales, including life size, and independent projects are undertaken in consultation with the faculty. Critiques involving the meaning and sculptural significance of the works are an integral part of the ongoing class activity.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 413 - Projects in Figure Modeling

    3 credits
    Allows the student to move beyond modeling the figure as an academic study. Exploration using the figure in expressive contexts is emphasized.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 421 - Advanced Projects

    3 credits
    Provides a studio context where maturing self-initiated areas of concentration in sculpture can be developed to fruition on an advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical emphasis is placed through both open and devised assignments on how materials and forms compatible to personal statements are found. Graduate students may register for this course under GRSC 621.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 422 - Advanced Projects

    3 credits
    Provides a studio context where maturing self-initiated areas of concentration in sculpture can be developed to fruition on an advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical emphasis is placed through both open and devised assignments on how materials and forms compatible to personal statements are found. Graduate students may register for this course under GRSC 621.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 433 - Metals

    1.5 credits
    Forming metal sculpture has contributed much to the history of sculpture, particularly in the present, where the idiom has become as familiar as carving and modeling. Concurrently offering both basic and advanced technical instruction in welding and forging using both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, this course is concerned with both the technical and aesthetic aspects of metal sculpture.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 611 - Major Studio I/Sculpture

    6 credits
    Evaluation of the student’s artistic involvement, projecting and testing options for the direction of the student’s graduate work.

    Open to graduate Sculpture students only.

  
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    GRSC 612 - Major Studio II/Sculpture

    6 credits
    Further exploration of the options, with increased awareness of theoretical issues and personal vision. Greater focus in the student’s work, with a view to completing the repertoire of skills and expression in the medium needed to undertake a thesis project.

    Prerequisites GRSC*611

    Open to graduate Sculpture students only.

  
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    GRSC 621 - Advanced Projects

    3 credits
    Provides a studio context where maturing self initiated areas of concentration in sculpture can be developed to fruition on an advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical emphasis is placed through both open and devised assignments on how materials and forms compatible to personal statements are found. Meets with FASC 421. In order to receive graduate credit, graduate students are expected to exceed undergraduate course expectations by applying the skills and competencies outlined in the syllabus to graduate-level concepts that typically relate to their major program of study. In this regard, graduate students taking this graduate elective are required to meet with the instructor prior to the start of class to determine and outline the nature of the requirements to be met.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRSC 699 - Topics: Sculpture

    1.5 - 6 credits
  
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    GRSC 711 - Major Studio III/Sculpture

    6 credits
    Planning and initiation of a sustained body of mature work to be presented in a thesis exhibition following the thesis exhibition semester.

    Prerequisites GRSC*612

    Open to graduate Sculpture students only.


Graduate - Special Topics

  
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    GRXX 699 - Special Topics

    1.5-6 cr
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

    Prerequisites Instructor permission required. Repeatable for credit.


Graphic Design

  
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    GDES 101 - Freshman Graphic Design Projects

    1.5 credits
    An elective course introducing the Foundation student to the profession of graphic design and its working processes. The classwork begins with directed formal studies and leads to an introductory communication project. Emphasis on the craftsmanship and working methods of the students as well as the breadth and depth of the student’s individual investigative process. Studio lecture/demonstrations focus upon professional case studies to supplement the course assignments. This course offers the student the opportunity to measure his or her suitability to the Graphic Design major.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    GDES 201 - Design Systems

    3 credits
    An intensive laboratory where the formal aspects of composition, organic and geometric form, color, symbolic drawing, craftsmanship, and the processes of conceptualizing are investigated. All of the assignments are founded on directed goals and playful investigation to train the student in the areas of selection, set theory, and visual logic.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation or MMDI*101 and MMDI*102

  
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    GDES 202 - Design Systems

    3 credits
    An intensive laboratory where the formal aspects of composition, organic and geometric form, color, symbolic drawing, craftsmanship, and the processes of conceptualizing are investigated. All of the assignments are founded on directed goals and playful investigation to train the student in the areas of selection, set theory, and visual logic.

    Prerequisites GDES*201

    Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits). Open to majors in the College of Art, Media, and Design only.

  
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    GDES 203 - Letterform Design

    3 credits
    The analysis and development of letterforms. The norms of weight, proportion, character width, and alphabetic relationships are developed perceptually, by hand. This course stresses the inherent optical relationships that exist in the construction of typefaces derived from the Latin alphabet.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation or MMDI*101 and MMDI*102

  
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    GDES 212 - Typography Fundamentals

    3 credits
    The course addresses the basic formal language of typography and the application of typographic principles to frame basic communication messages. Typographic investigations are achieved by both manual and digital means.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation or MMDI*101 and MMDI*102

  
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    GDES 220 - Selected Topics in Graphic Design

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course allows for the presentation of one-time, unique studio experiences involving either specialized themes, media, classroom structures, or teaching and learning formats, for the development of projects relevant to contemporary Graphic Design issues.

  
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    GDES 221 - Descriptive Drawing

    3 credits
    A freehand drawing course that teaches the student to consciously observe, analyze, understand, and represent the underlying structure and form of manmade and natural objects. Logical representation and problem-solving is emphasized. A visual vocabulary of line, shape, value, texture, and their spatial organization is developed so that drawing can be used as a method of research and invention.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

  
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    GDES 222 - Descriptive Drawing

    3 credits
    A continuation of Descriptive Drawing GDES 221. A freehand, analytical drawing course that concentrates on organic form and objects from nature. Formal composition and visual vocabulary of line, shape, value, texture, and spatial organization are stressed. Drawing skills are developed to sketch and research visual concepts, as well as to use the medium for the invention of original images in upper-level courses.

    Prerequisites GDES*221

  
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    GDES 301 - Communications Studio

    3 credits
    Developing an understanding of visual relationships and how to use them to create visual impact and clarity while solving communications problems. Invention, intuition, and discovery are combined with logical thought and thorough preliminary research. Special attention is given to refining the student’s perceptual abilities, hand skills, and the integration of various media. Coursework is completed using both traditional and computer technologies. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI 203, or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*202 and EMDI*202

  
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    GDES 302 - Communications Studio

    3 credits
    A continuation of GDES 301, concentrating on the development of color, sensitivity, perceptual abilities, and hand skills within a communications context. A working process that develops invention through logical thought and intuition is applied to communication problems. Coursework is completed using both traditional and computer technologies. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite and introductory experience in time-based software, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI*204, or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*202 and EMDI*203

  
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    GDES 311 - Typographic Systems

    3 credits
    This course investigates and defines the principles of typography in a communication context. Directed research based upon typographic norms addresses the issues of informational hierarchies achievable through visual form and structure as well as the editorial and expressive potentials of typography. Coursework is completed both using traditional and computer technologies. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI 202, or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites EMDI*202 and GDES*212

  
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    GDES 312 - Typographic Systems

    3 credits
    This course is an extension and continuation of Typographic Systems GDES 311. The course addresses the typographic principles of the grid, text typography, text hierarchies, and image integration, all within the context of a multipage format. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, image scanning, and introductory experience in time-based software, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI 204, or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*311 and EMDI*203

  
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    GDES 331 - Photographics I

    3 credits
    Develops a designer’s methodology and viewpoint to achieve both structure and meaning in photography, and as a way to extend the range of how objects and nature can be seen and translated using photographic processes. Students use both traditional photography and digital software to create hybrid photographic images.

  
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    GDES 334 - Font Design Lab

    3 credits
    The emphasis of this course is on the design and production of an entire alphabet or limited set of letters to form distinct word picture as in a logotype. The work process seamlessly integrates hand and computer skills. Students rely on, expand, and also question existing conventions of the Roman alphabet. The course uses specialized type design software to make the new typefaces available in word processing or page layout environments. The course provides highly applicable professional skills.

    Prerequisites GDES*203

    Priority enrollment to Typography Minors

  
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    GDES 335 - Single Image

    3 credits
    This course explores the communication potential of imagery both in a single and/or serial format. Students develop an understanding of literal and abstract forms of expression and how they can be used to articulate and solve visual concepts.

    Prerequisites GDES*202

    Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits). Open to majors in the College of Art, Media, and Design only. Priority enrollment to Graphic Design majors.

  
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    GDES 336 - Visualizing Information

    3 credits
    This elective course emphasizes the analytical understanding, purposeful structuring, and clear visual presentation of information-rich content. Issues of information design including accessibility, transparency, credibility, quantity, density, dimensionality, and utility, as well as universality and language independence are investigated. Applications including maps, guides, diagrams, instructions, timelines, charts, graphs, and tables are explored using both traditional and electronic media.

    Prerequisites GDES*201

  
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    GDES 401 - Design Studio

    3 credits
    A wide-ranging exploration of the connections between image and text, and symbolic and narrative imagery. These studies are supported by inquiries into semiotics, information theory, and research methodology. This course uses both traditional and computer technologies within a thorough research process. Preliminary research and definition of a self-generated degree project is undertaken by Graphic Design majors in this course. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and authoring and scripting skills in time-based software or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*302 and EMDI*204

  
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    GDES 402 - Design Studio: Senior Project

    3 credits
    A self-generated degree project involving research, proposals, complete design formulation, and final presentation. Topics are reviewed by a panel of faculty in Graphic Design; and the students are reviewed by an outside critic midway through the preliminary stages of development. This course uses both traditional and computer technologies within a thorough research process. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and authoring and scripting skills in time-based software or receive instructor permission.

    Prerequisites GDES*401 and EMDI*204

    Open to Graphic Design majors only.

  
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    GDES 403 - Problem Solving

    3 credits
    Develops approaches to solving communications problems of diverse character and increasingly practical application. It assumes a high level of formal competence and places special emphasis on working within technical and time constraints by developing clear and concise thought patterns. This course uses both traditional and computer technologies within a thorough research process. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and authoring and scripting skills in time-based software or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*302 and EMDI*204

  
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    GDES 404 - Problem Solving

    3 credits
    A continuation of Problem Solving GDES 403. This course develops approaches to solving communications problems of broad scope and increasingly practical application. Students work within technical and time constraints while developing clear and concise thought patterns. The course assumes a high level of formal competence and places special emphasis on the development of unified visual and conceptual relationships across various formats and scale. Both traditional and computer technologies are used within a thorough research process. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and authoring and scripting skills in time-based software or receive instructor approval.

    Prerequisites GDES*403 and EMDI*204

  
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    GDES 411 - Advanced Typography

    3 credits
    This elective course addresses typography as a primary vehicle to communicate information and as a support to images. Assignments range from informational design to expressive, content-based problems, to intuitive investigations and formal experiments. Although traditional methods of conceptualizing are used within a thorough visual process, extensive computer work is involved. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop.

    Prerequisites GDES*311

  
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    GDES 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    GDES 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRGD 311 - Typographic Systems

    3 credits
    This course investigates and defines the principles of typography in a communication context. Directed research based upon typographic norms addresses the issues of informational hierarchies achievable through visual form and structure as well as the editorial and expressive potentials of typography. Coursework is completed both using traditional and computer technologies. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI 202, or receive instructor approval.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRGD 312 - Typographic Systems

    3 credits
    This course is an extension and continuation of Typographic Systems GDES 311. The course addresses the typographic principles of the grid, text typography, text hierarchies, and image integration, all within the context of a multipage format. Students must have working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, image scanning, and introductory experience in time-based software, be concurrently enrolled in EMDI 204, or receive instructor approval.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRGD 331 - Photographics I

    3 credits
    Develops a designer’s methodology and viewpoint to achieve both structure and meaning in photography, and as a way to extend the range of how objects and nature can be seen and translated using photographic processes. Students use both traditional photography and digital software to create hybrid photographic images.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRGD 336 - Visualizing Information

    3 credits
    This elective course emphasizes the analytical understanding, purposeful structuring, and clear visual presentation of information-rich content. Issues of information design including accessibility, transparency, credibility, quantity, density, dimensionality, and utility, as well as universality and language independence are investigated. Applications including maps, guides, diagrams, instructions, timelines, charts, graphs, and tables are explored using both traditional and electronic media.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRGD 411 - Advanced Typography

    3 credits
    This elective course addresses typography as a primary vehicle to communicate information and as a support to images. Assignments range from informational design to expressive, content-based problems, to intuitive investigations and formal experiments. Although traditional methods of conceptualizing are used within a thorough visual process, extensive computer work is involved. Students should have expertise in Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop.

  
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    GRGD 699 - Topics: Graphic Design

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.


Illustration

  
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    CAIN 497 - Design Internship

    3 credits
  
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    GRIL 202 - Illustration Methods

    3 credits
    Introduction to drawing and painting skills as they relate to illustration. Objective visual perception, clarity in drawing, and technical facility are stressed. Students are exposed to visual communications, strategies, and design concepts through exposure to art history and the field of contemporary illustration.

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    GRIL 301 - Illustration Methods

    3 credits
    The development of narrative imagery, pictorial illusion, and space, and their combined potential for communication. Procedures focus on developing visual awareness, personal imagery, and conceptual directions. Direct drawing situations and photographic reference (existing or student-produced) also serve as source material for pictorial development. Various media and technical procedures are explored. Assignments and lectures focus on the requirements of applied illustration.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 302 - Illustration Methods

    3 credits
    The development of narrative imagery, pictorial illusion, and space, and their combined potential for communication. Procedures focus on developing visual awareness, personal imagery, and conceptual directions. Direct drawing situations and photographic reference (existing or student-produced) also serve as source material for pictorial development. Various media and technical procedures are explored. Assignments and lectures focus on the requirements of applied illustration.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 312 - Figure Utilization

    3 credits
    Studies of the figure in narrative contexts are explored, as is work from single and grouped models, nude and costumed. Concentration is on developing compositions and concepts from different and often combined resources. Drawing and painting techniques are utilized.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 320 - Design Methods

    3 credits
    Within the context of design/illustration projects, a basic understanding of how artwork is reproduced in commercial print media. Emphasis is on the relationship between electronic media and production techniques. Specific programs utilized include: Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 321 - Figurative Communication

    3 credits
    Emphasis on working from life. The course focuses on the use of the figure and or still life objects to communicate concepts in the figurative context. Drawing and painting media are explored.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 322 - Sequential Format

    3 credits
    Course focuses on sequential formats as they relate to illustrations and graphic design. Potential areas of inquiry: brochures, storyboarding, simple animations, slide presentations, websites, multipage spreads, and identity programs.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 380 - Children’s Book Illustration

    3 credits
    The design and illustration of children’s books. Emphasis on the stages of development of a book from manuscript through dummy design to finished art. Professional practice and working with editors and art directors are discussed. Students become familiar with the work of past and present book illustration and design.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 480 - Communication Workshop

    1.5 credits
    In this unique, collaborative studio course, Graphic Design and Illustration Majors work to produce two posters per semester for the School of Theater Arts Main Stage Productions. Mentored by illustration and graphic design faculty, students are challenged with real-life, professional design studio experiences such as working on deadline with a client, illustration and design concept to completion, and final publication in the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts. Posters are used to advertise upcoming theatre productions on campus and throughout the Philadelphia community. The course also provides students with an excellent opportunity to get an actual printed piece for their portfolios.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRIL 699 - Topics: Illustration

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

  
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    ILUS 101 - Foundation Illustration

    1.5 credits
    Within the context of illustration assignments, students are introduced to a variety of media, methods, styles, and techniques used to create both black-and-white and color illustrations. The course includes conceptual, perceptual, and technical problems. The development of narrative skills, logical steps to problem solving, research, and creative thinking is also covered. Numerous presentations are made by guest illustrators.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors.

  
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    ILUS 201 - Pictorial Foundation

    3 credits
    Introduction to drawing and painting skills as they relate to illustration. Objective visual perception, clarity in drawing, and technical facility are stressed. Students are exposed to visual communications, strategies, and design concepts through exposure to art history and the field of contemporary illustration.

    Prerequisites FNDP*121 and FNDP*111

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 202 - Pictorial Foundation

    3 credits
    Introduction to drawing and painting skills as they relate to illustration. Objective visual perception, clarity in drawing, and technical facility are stressed. Students are exposed to visual communications, strategies, and design concepts through exposure to art history and the field of contemporary illustration.

    Prerequisites ILUS*201

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 211 - Figure Anatomy

    3 credits
    Focus on the investigation and application of line, plane, mass, light and shade, shadow, perspective, anatomy, and proportion as they relate to figure drawing. Weekly sessions include a lecture, demonstrations from the skeleton, and drawing from life.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 212 - Figure Anatomy

    3 credits
    Focus on the investigation and application of line, plane, mass, light and shade, shadow, perspective, anatomy, and proportion as they relate to figure drawing. Weekly sessions include a lecture, demonstrations from the skeleton, and drawing from life.

    Prerequisites ILUS*211

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 219 - Selected Topics in Illustration

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course allows for the presentation of one-time, unique studio experiences involving either specialized themes, media, classroom structures, or teaching and learning formats, for the development of projects relevant to contemporary Illustration issues.

  
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    ILUS 220 - Typography

    3 credits
    Beginning studies in the form, use, nomenclature, and history of typography. Individual letters, word formations, text arrangements, and the application of type to simple communication exercises. Use of Macintosh computer for generating type and industry-accepted software is used.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111 and FNDP*121

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    ILUS 280 - Anatomy Elective

    3 credits
    Focus on the investigation and application of line, plane, mass, light and shade, shadow, perspective, anatomy, and proportion as they relate to figure drawing. Weekly sessions include a lecture, demonstrations from the skeleton, and drawing from life.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    ILUS 285 - Volumetric Figure Drawing

    3 credits
    Introduces and develops the skills needed for good figurative animation drawing. Of primary concern is anatomical figure drawing with an emphasis on the structure and solidity of the figure, good proportions, and specific movement and gesture as they relate to the model. Other topics are two-and-three-dimensional ways of translating form, how perspective and viewpoint are used with the figure and affect scale, exaggerated foreshortening, diagrammatic and expressive line quality, facial expressions, hand and foot studies, capturing movement through gesture, and animal drawing.

    Prerequisites FNDP*111 or FNDP*112

    Priority enrollment to Animation majors.

  
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    ILUS 286 - Layout

    3 credits
    This sequel to ILUS 285 (Volumetric Figure Drawing) introduces and develops the skills and knowledge needed to create competently rendered, dynamic, three-dimensional space and convincingly place volumetrically rendered characters into such space, with attention to acting and storytelling needs. Topics include figures in space; creating the illusion of space; linear and aerial perspectives; how space creates mood and supports theme; the importance of viewpoint; composition, lighting, and color; how detail creates character; figure drawing as it relates to weight, balance, gesture, action and volumetric representation.

    Prerequisites ILUS*285

  
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    ILUS 301 - Illustration Methods

    3 credits
    The development of narrative imagery, pictorial illusion, and space, and their combined potential for communication. Procedures focus on developing visual awareness, personal imagery, and conceptual directions. Direct drawing situations and photographic reference (existing or student-produced) also serve as source material for pictorial development. Various media and technical procedures are explored. Assignments and lectures focus on the requirements of applied illustration.

    Prerequisites ILUS*202

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    ILUS 302 - Illustration Methods

    3 credits
    The development of narrative imagery, pictorial illusion, and space, and their combined potential for communication. Procedures focus on developing visual awareness, personal imagery, and conceptual directions. Direct drawing situations and photographic reference (existing or student-produced) also serve as source material for pictorial development. Various media and technical procedures are explored. Assignments and lectures focus on the requirements of applied illustration.

    Prerequisites ILUS*301

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    ILUS 312 - Figure Utilization

    3 credits
    Studies of the figure in narrative contexts are explored, as is work from single and grouped models, nude and costumed. Concentration is on developing compositions and concepts from different and often combined resources. Drawing and painting techniques are utilized.

    Prerequisites ILUS*321

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 320 - Design Methods

    3 credits
    Within the context of design/illustration projects, a basic understanding of how artwork is reproduced in commercial print media. Emphasis is on the relationship between electronic media and production techniques. Specific programs utilized include: Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop.

    Prerequisites ILUS*220

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

    Restrictions Junior/Senior Preferred
  
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    ILUS 321 - Figurative Communication

    3 credits
    Emphasis on working from life. The course focuses on the use of the figure and or still life objects to communicate concepts in the figurative context. Drawing and painting media are explored.

    Prerequisites ILUS*212

    Priority enrollment to Illustration majors and Figurative Illustration minors.

  
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    ILUS 322 - Sequential Format

    3 credits
    Course focuses on sequential formats as they relate to illustrations and graphic design. Potential areas of inquiry: brochures, storyboarding, simple animations, slide presentations, websites, multipage spreads, and identity programs.

    Prerequisites ILUS*320

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

  
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    ILUS 380 - Children’s Book Illustration

    3 credits
    The design and illustration of children’s books. Emphasis on the stages of development of a book from manuscript through dummy design to finished art. Professional practice and working with editors and art directors are discussed. Students become familiar with the work of past and present book illustration and design.

    Prerequisites FNDP*112

    Priority enrollment to Ilustration majors.

    Restrictions Junior/Senior Preferred
  
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    ILUS 401 - Illustration

    3 credits
    Assignments revolve around specific areas of illustration, advertising, book, documentary, editorial, and institutional. Emphasis is on communication, personal viewpoint, and focused technique that are practical and relevant, to professional needs and demands. A senior thesis project, the William H. Ely Illustration Exhibition, is incorporated into the late fall and early spring semesters.

    Prerequisites ILUS*302

    Open to Illustration majors only.

  
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    ILUS 402 - Illustration

    3 credits
    Assignments revolve around specific areas of illustration: advertising, book, documentary, editorial, and institutional. Emphasis is on communication, personal viewpoint, and focused technique that are practical and relevant, to professional needs and demands. A senior thesis project, the William H. Ely Illustration Exhibition, is incorporated into the late fall and early spring semesters.

    Prerequisites ILUS*401

    Open to Illustration majors only.

  
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    ILUS 441 - Senior Portfolio

    3 credits
    Development of a portfolio based on the student’s personal interests, abilities and target markets. Students focus on a traditional, digital or design illustration orientation and develop, over the year, a working portfolio for presentation at the end of the spring term. In addition, the course offers instruction in marketing and promotion, business practices and procedures, resume writing, taxes, and small business requirements as they relate to artists. The course culminates in The University of the Arts Portfolio Day in New York City at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites ILUS*302

    Open to Illustration majors only.

  
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    ILUS 442 - Senior Portfolio

    3 credits
    Development of a portfolio based on the student’s personal interests, abilities and target markets. Students focus on a traditional, digital or design illustration orientation and develop, over the year, a working portfolio for presentation at the end of the spring term. In addition, the course offers instruction in marketing and promotion, business practices and procedures, resume writing, taxes, and small business requirements as they relate to artists. The course culminates in The University of the Arts Portfolio Day in New York City at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites ILUS*441

    Open to Illustration majors only.

  
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    ILUS 480 - Communication Workshop

    1.5 credits
    In this unique, collaborative studio course, Graphic Design and Illustration Majors work to produce two posters per semester for the School of Theater Arts Main Stage Productions. Mentored by illustration and graphic design faculty, students are challenged with real-life, professional design studio experiences such as working on deadline with a client, illustration and design concept to completion, and final publication in the Borowsky Center for Publication Arts. Posters are used to advertise upcoming theatre productions on campus and throughout the Philadelphia community. The course also provides students with an excellent opportunity to get an actual printed piece for their portfolios.

    Prerequisites FNDP*112

    Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits). Open to Graphic Design and Illustration majors, only.

  
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    ILUS 482 - Illustration Workshop: Personal Viewpoint

    3 credits
    A special elective course for qualified Junior and Senior Illustration majors. The Department invites three of America’s most accomplished illustrators to share their talent, insights, and expertise by finding and emphasizing the personal conceptual viewpoint of each student. The goal is to meld that identity with each student’s developing technique to create the greater vision of the artist through illustration as a self-expressive art form. Each of the three faculty presents their work and answers questions in an open forum and then teaches an intensive four-week long segment of the course. The artists give lectures, technical demonstrations, and studio assignments, and students work through a demanding process to produce finished illustrations. This flexible curriculum also allows for timely illustration issues to be covered as they develop in the field.

    Prerequisites ILUS*301

  
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    ILUS 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    ILUS 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.


Industrial Design

  
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    IDES 101 - Freshman I.D.

    1.5 credits
    This course introduces first-year students to the issues surrounding the profession and highlights its importance in informing culture and shaping the way we live. Students are exposed to the fundamental skills required to support the process of concept ideation, design development, and presentation of products and furniture. These fundamentals are introduced through in-class exercises, lectures by visiting professionals, and direct involvement in relevant activities within the Industrial Design Department itself.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    IDES 201 - Studio 1: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    A conceptual and practical understanding of design and three-dimensional problem-solving processes. This studio is taught in a collaborative manner, with two instructors conducting projects individually or as a team in order to provide focused instruction and integrated experiences covering a wide range of subjects including the tools, processes, and languages of design and model making. Emphasis is on the development of three-dimensional, model-making skills, problem solving and creative thinking, and their application to problems of design.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 202 - Studio 1: Projects Studio

    3 credits
    A conceptual and practical understanding of design and three-dimensional, problem-solving processes. This studio is taught in a collaborative manner, with two instructors conducting projects individually or as a team in order to provide focused instruction and integrated experiences covering a wide range of subjects including the tools, processes, and languages of design and model making. Emphasis is on the development of three-dimensional, model-making skills, problem solving and creative thinking, and their application to problems of design.

    Prerequisites IDES*201

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 220 - Selected Topics in Industrial Design

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course allows for the presentation of one-time, unique studio experiences involving either specialized themes, media, classroom structures, or teaching and learning formats, for the development of projects relevant to contemporary Industrial Design issues.

  
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    IDES 221 - Studio 2: Techniques

    3 credits
    This studio assists the student to acquire essential two-dimensional representational skills to support the process of design, including production and presentation. It is taught in a collaborative manner, with the instructors conducting projects individually or as a team in order to provide focused instruction and integrated experiences over a wide range of subjects, including the tools, processes, and languages of conceptual drawing, rendering, and detailing using both the computer and traditional media as means to assist design and control production. Principles of technical specification and machine control are introduced as are concepts such as rapid photocopying, computer-integrated manufacturing, parts reduction through integration, and other techniques for efficient production. Students learn to apply these techniques to design problems addressed in IDES 201: Projects Studio.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 222 - Studio 2: Techniques

    3 credits
    This studio assists the student to acquire essential two-dimensional representational skills to support the process of design, including production and presentation. It is taught in a collaborative manner, with the instructors conducting projects individually or as a team in order to provide focused instruction and integrated experiences over a wide range of subjects, including the tools, processes, and languages of conceptual drawing, rendering, and detailing using both the computer and traditional media as means to assist design and control production. Principles of technical specification and machine control are introduced as are concepts such as rapid photocopying, computer-integrated manufacturing, parts reduction through integration, and other techniques for efficient production. Students learn to apply these techniques to design problems addressed in IDES 201: Projects Studio.

    Prerequisites IDES*221

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 231 - Design Issues Seminar

    3 credits
    This course is designed to assist the student to develop an understanding of the major issues for design in modern society. Discussions range from issues such as the ecological responsibility of designers to the contributions of individual designers and design organizations throughout the history of the discipline. Assignments include research and demonstration projects that explore ideas and illuminate ethical, practical, and moral issues with which designers should be concerned. Students prepare information and present their views on issues through written, oral, and visual means.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

  
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    IDES 232 - Materials & Processes Seminar

    3 credits
    A writing-intensive course introducing the student to the nature of materials used in industrial products and the various processes by which they are formed. Films, lectures, and field trips familiarize students with wood, metal, and plastic materials as well as processes such as injection molding, laser cutting, and stereolithography. Emphasis is placed on the study of material characteristics and the appropriate use of forming methods. Introduction to technical information, specification writing, and professional communications. Graduate students may register for this course under GRID 614.

    Prerequisites Completion of Foundation

    Open to Industrial Design majors only.

 

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