Oct 17, 2018  
2011-2012 University Catalogue 
    
2011-2012 University Catalogue []

Courses


 

Course Renumbering

Commencing with the 2013-14 academic year the University began a multi-year course renumbering.  For additional information visit the Course Renumbering page on the Office of the Registrar website.

Renumbered Course List 

  • Division of Liberal Arts
    Many courses within the Division of Liberal Arts commencing with the Summer and Fall 2014 terms will be offered under new course numbers. Students registering for Summer 2014 coursework and beyond will do so using the new course numbers.
 

Other Courses

  
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    DACR 376 - Junior Seminar: Introduction to Business Management and Tech Production

    2.0 credits
    A basic production course dealing with concepts of lighting and set design for dance. Students are required to gain practical experience by working in the theater on dance concerts during the year.

  
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    GRFA 311 - Drawing: Object, Subject, and Metaphor

    3 credits
    “A studio course that treats the recognition of meaning and motive in imagery. How is an image interpreted? What is signified by the mode, the format, and the forms presented? Assignments explore options for investing images with thought and feeling.”

  
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    GRFA 312 - Site-Specific Projects

    3 credits
    Focus on the production of drawings and models of site-specific projects. Issues related to public art, environmental art, public and private realms, materiality, site selection, and site specificity are explored.

  
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    GRUA 699 - Special Topics

    1.5 - 6 credits
  
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    TCLA 200 - Travel Course: LA Topics

    1 - 3 credits
    Travel Courses are designed to expose students to an international perspective, increase their intercultural awareness, increase their awareness of professional responsibilities within a global context and provide an enhanced sense of personal responsibility and independence. Travel courses are developed by faculty with expertise in a particular area or culture of the world and are generally offered only once.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    TCST 200 - Travel Course: Studio Topic

    1 - 3 credits
    Travel Courses are designed to expose students to an international perspective, increase their intercultural awareness, increase their awareness of professional responsibilities within a global context and provide an enhanced sense of personal responsibility and independence. Travel courses are developed by faculty with expertise in a particular area or culture of the world and are generally offered only once.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    UA 5 - First-Year Success Seminar

    1 credit
    UA 005 is designed to help first-year students understand and manage their coursework, personal responsibilities, and extracurricular activities to help them to become a successful student artist at UArts. In the seminar, students will develop their own answers to questions such as “What does it mean to be an artist?,” “What are my goals?” and “How do you live and work successfully within a community of artists?” Students will investigate, discuss, and learn to implement the learning and creative strategies of successful emerging artists. Elements covered in the seminar include, but are not limited to, creative practice, critical thinking development, study and life skills, and time management. Assigned readings, discussion topics, reflective and research-oriented writing assignments, and independent and collaborative projects will be used to inspire and strengthen students and to build on what they are learning in their other courses.

    Student must have completed the 1st semester of their Freshman year (15 credits).

  
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    UA 112 - Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    1 credit
    The focus of this course is on the PROCESS of creative collaboration rather than on the PRODUCT. Students work in their own area of specialization and may venture into other artistic disciplines as dictated by of the nature of the collaborative project they choose to create. All UArts majors are invited to participate in this student-driven course, with guest professor/artists from various disciplines.


Art and Design Education

  
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    AEDU 200 - Presentation Skills

    1 credit
    This course addresses effective speech and presentation skills for the teacher, artist, and administrator communicating with groups, classes, or clients.

  
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    AEDU 201 - Introduction to Visual Arts Education

    2 credits
    A theoretical and practical introduction to the entire field of art education with an emphasis on studio processes. A survey of various aspects of teaching in a variety of situations and environments, through field observations and classroom lectures/discussions, including public and private schools K-12, as well as specialized and alternative settings in museum education, early childhood education, special education (for students with disabilities and gifted children), and adult education.

  
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    AEDU 490 - Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    AEDU 499 - Internship

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 501 - Creative and Cognitive Development

    3 credits
    This course is designed to develop skills in recognizing the developmental stages of children, adolescents, and adults according to the theories of Jean Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, Viktor Lowenfeld, and Erick Erickson. In addition, the course explores the learning theories of Jerome Bruner, B.F. Skinner, Howard Gardner, Madeline Hunter, and Bernice McCarthy toward understanding individual differences in creative and cognitive development and learning styles.

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 503 - The Art of Teaching

    3 credits
    Teacher preparation and knowledge of instructional techniques will be addressed, including professional image, teachers’ rights and responsibilities, and aspects of group process. The course explores cultural and family factors that influence learning expectations conveyed by teachers and peer behavior and techniques of instruction and creativity. A retrospective analysis of each student’s individual education experience and perceptions of teaching is explored through interactive simulation of classroom situations and teaching styles.

  
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    AEDU 509 - Professional Writing Intensive

    2 credits
    This course is required for students entering all art education programs (pre-certification, MAT, MA) who have not passed the Art Education Department writing proficiency exam. It addresses the use of effective and cogent written communication for the teacher, artist, and administrator to classes, groups, or clients.

  
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    AEDU 510 - Service Learning

    1 - 3 credits
    Through placements in a public, private, or other institutional setting serving special education students and/or ELL (English Language Learners), students observe, plan, and teach art lessons with guidance and supervision by an assigned mentor. The course enables pre-practicum (student teaching) students to extend their knowledge and skills into the classroom, to address genuine community needs, and to develop a sense of social justice and civic responsibility.

    Open to Art Education majors only

  
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    AEDU 531 - Multicultural Learning-Arts

    3 credits
    The artistic expressions of Africa, Asia, the Americas, the Near and Middle East, and related societies are examined for their aesthetic and contextual meanings. Cross-cultural contributions to world art history are recognized through the study of characteristic styles and techniques, dynastic periods of art and artists, as well as the relationship of art to varied systems of belief.

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 532 - Meeting Needs of ELL Learners

    3 credits
    This 15-week course will address the issues and complexities regarding the cultural, educational, and linguistic background of ELL’s. Application to standards-based instruction aligned with alernative assessments will be explored as well as gaining knowledge of ELL program development as stated by Pennsylvania’s Basic Education Curricular (BEC) documents for ELL’s. Legal responsibilites will be addressed as states by the Office of Civil Rights as a way to keep students informed of the rights of ELL’s.

  
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    AEDU 533 - Art and Inclusionary Education

    3 credits
    This course is designed to provide the full scope of methodologies, techniques and innovative strategies needed to teach special education students effectively. Using the arts as a means for adapting to diverse learning methods, the K-12 classroom is regarded as a dynamic setting for inclusionary learning. The impact of special needs art education is further realized through direct school and community engagement; programs and national as well as local organizations, are made available to assist in developing field placements. Arranged field placement opportunities include a broad range of community resources.

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 541 - Program Design & Methods: Elementary

    3 credits
    Through review of current literature, lectures, discussion, field observation, and mini-teaching, students explore various educational philosophies and develop and implement effective classroom curricula based on prevailing theories of learning and child development. Topics include management issues; interdisciplinary content and teaching of art; evaluation and assessment of teaching and learning; and the integration of digital technology.

    Prerequisites AEDU*201

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 542 - Program Design & Methods: Secondary

    3 credits
    Students in this course will explore current educational “”best practices”” in the field of secondary art education. Focus areas for learning will include curriculum development, lesson planning, classroom leadership, collaborative learning, student assessment, learning environments, materials ordering, and time budgeting. Class structure includes weekly outside reading assignments, group discussions, methods demonstrations, studio production activities, reflective writing, and field observation. Includes 3 hours field work (8 weeks).

    Prerequisites AEDU*541 or AEDU*560

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 543 - Aesthetics and Art Criticism

    3 credits
    This course is designed to develop skills, techniques, and strategies for integrating developmentally appropriate aesthetics and art criticism activities in the K-12 classroom. Using prevailing theories of learning, teaching, and child development, students will design puzzle cases, activities, and curricula that promote the philosophical investigation and interpretation of art and aesthetic objects.

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 560 - Saturday Practicum

    3 credits
    Students are involved in various aspects of the Saturday Arts Lab. They observe classroom instruction, plan and teach lessons, and exhibit student work under the supervision of cooperating master teachers and through the instruction of a professor in the seminar portion of the course. Field work(10 weeks).

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 561 - Student Teaching: Elementary

    4 credits
    An intensive, elementary-level field experience built around a seven-week student teaching internship, under the guidance and supervision of a highly qualified art teacher/mentor. It is intended to provide practical experience in which the intern assumes professional-level responsibilities and experiences in teaching art at the elementary level. A University supervisor observes, advises, facilitates the relationship between the mentor and intern, and assesses the student during the internship. AEDU 561 is taken concurrently with AEDU 565. (If students elect to take AEDU 561 one semester and AEDU 562 another semester, AEDU 565 must be taken both semesters.)

    Prerequisites AEDU*533, AEDU*541, AEDU*542, and AEDU*560

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 562 - Student Teaching: Secondary

    4 credits
    An intensive, secondary-level field experience built around a seven-week student teaching internship, under the guidance and supervision of a highly qualified art teacher/mentor. It is intended to provide practical experience in which the intern assumes professional-level responsibilities and experiences in teaching art at the elementary level. A University supervisor observes, advises, facilitates the relationship between the mentor and intern, and assesses the student during the internship. AEDU 562 is taken concurrently with AEDU 565. (If students elect to take AEDU 562 one semester and AEDU 561 another semester, AEDU 565 must be taken both semesters.)

    Prerequisites AEDU*533, AEDU*541, AEDU*542, and AEDU*560

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 565 - Student Teaching Seminar: Elementary/Secondary

    1 credit
    Discussion and analysis of: field experiences; special workshops; Literacy: Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum: Professional Teaching Portfolios; One-Year Curriculums for an Elementary and a Secondary Grade. Continuing development and refinement of skills in reflective practice is emphasized as well as the needs of special learners. AEDU 565 is taken concurrently with AEDU 561 and AEDU 562. (If students elect to take AEDU 561 and AEDU 562 over two semesters, AEDU 565 Student Teaching Seminar must be taken both semesters.)

    Prerequisites AEDU*533, AEDU*541, AEDU*542, and AEDU*560

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only.

  
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    AEDU 600 - Graduate Art Ed Colloquium

    1 credit
    This course assumes that some of the program participants either are teachers now or may teach at some level during their professional careers. The colloquium is an interdisciplinary forum intended to relate studio development and accomplishment as well as critical, aesthetic, and historical aspects of art, to the process and implementation of learning and teaching. Utilizing lectures, readings, visual resources and directed group dynamics and discussions, the colloquium explores varied topics during each of the four summers.

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only. Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    AEDU 602 - History of Ideas in Art and Museum Education

    3 credits
    Seminar on major issues and trends in the history of art and museum education, with an emphasis on child-centered and content-centered theories and the theoretical antecedents of Discipline-Based Art Education, the Visual Culture movement, and standards-based education.

  
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    AEDU 606 - Research in Education: Methods and Trends

    3 credits
    A graduate education seminar on principal approaches to research for art and museum education. The course examines types of research, applications and recent studies for their methodologies and findings, grant writing, and assessment techniques.

  
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    AEDU 610 - Graduate Studio Seminar

    3 credits
    A one-semester interdisciplinary seminar exclusively for art educators. Topics of broad concern to studio artists are addressed in response to students’ work, assigned readings, and occasional public lectures or other art events in the University and the community.

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only. Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    AEDU 621 - Educational Media A: Teaching and Learning Online

    3 credits
    This online course provides students with the knowledge, skills, and strategies to successfully integrate educational media into the teaching and learning of K-12 art. Areas of study include theoretical and conceptual basis for educational technology; instructional practices and strategies; approaches to integrating technology into the curriculum; training and development of technology skills, such as computer graphics, Web page design, and electronic presentations; and issues and problems related to technology use in education.

    Restrictions Computer Literacy Required
  
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    AEDU 622 - Educational Media B: Planning and Management Online

    3 credits
    This online course addresses the design, planning, and management of educational media in the K-12 classroom and school. Topics include developing a technology plan; software and hardware acquisition and assessment; care, maintenance, and security of classroom and lab computer technologies; networking concepts, design, and protocols; Internet basics and issues; and managing technological and human resources. Online guest speakers support the study of these topics. Independent online visitations to either K-12 educational settings, technology fairs, conferences, or businesses.

    Restrictions Computer Literacy Required
  
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    AEDU 625 - Interactive Media

    3 credits
    This course acquaints students with existing technology and media available for instruction to art and museum educators. Students learn to design and create interactive multimedia projects using a variety of multimedia authoring tools.

  
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    AEDU 631 - Design for Interdisciplinary Learning

    3 credits
    An introduction and curricular model for integrated learning in which design and the visual arts, music, theater, and dance are the central means of integrating all disciplines to provide a more holistic approach to learning. An approach to arts-centered learning through a design-based, problem-solving model is emphasized to address issues in all subjects and at all levels of education.

    Priority enrollment to Art Education majors and concentrations.

  
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    AEDU 632 - Applications of Interdisciplinary Learning

    3 credits
    Practical application of the knowledge gained in variety of curriculum frameworks. Students use a variety of models and thematic approaches to develop integrated arts curriculum that relates the arts to other disciplines. In keeping with interdisciplinarity in a postmodern aesthetic, students use a variety of interactive media. Class sessions include lectures, media presentations, discussions, interactive group activities, guest presenters, and workshops in the University and the community.

    Prerequisites AEDU*631

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    AEDU 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    AEDU 695 - Graduate Project/Thesis

    3 credits
    Culminating independent project supervised by a faculty advisor. The graduate project or thesis may take either of two distinct forms: a) an academic thesis presenting original research in a significant historical, theoretical, or pedagogical question relating to visual arts education, or b) a studio or curriculum project intended for use as a pedagogical tool. This course may not be taken in a 6 credit block.

    Prerequisites AEDU*602, AEDU*606, and AEDU*610

    Open to Art Education majors and concentrations only. Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAE 699 - Topics: Art Education

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.


Art Therapy

  
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    AETH 301 - Introduction to Art Therapy

    3 credits
    Introduces students to key concepts and dimensions of the art therapy profession. Course content addresses the different orientations and approaches that comprise this discipline, as well as the diverse populations that are served. Art therapists who work within a wide range of settings are invited to present to the class to balance the theoretical with the practical.

    Prerequisites LASS*871 and LASS*872

  
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    AETH 302 - Social and Group Process

    3 credits
    Introduces students to a basic understanding of social groups, group behaviors, group therapy, and group art therapy. The class helps students to better identify their own role as well as that of others within a group setting. Experiential art tasks are used to underscore course material and exemplify group dynamics.

    Prerequisites AETH*301

  
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    AETH 303 - Theories and Techniques of Art Therapy With Adults

    3 credits
    This course explores the practice of art therapy with adults as demonstrated through the use of case material from a variety of clinical populations. Overviews of diagnostic indicators as seen in artwork are presented. Issues of long- and short-term treatment are addressed, as well as a rich variety of interventions that are at the art therapists’ disposal.

    Prerequisites AETH*304

  
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    AETH 304 - Theories and Techniques of Art Therapy With Children and Adolescents

    3 credits
    Introduces students to the use of art therapy with children and adolescents, including the different arenas where art therapists work with children, as well as the various approaches that are utilized. Normal child development, as evidenced in artwork, serves as the foundation for understanding key concepts. Indicators of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral difficulties, as seen in art productions, are also presented.

    Prerequisites LASS*973 and AETH*301

  
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    AETH 401 - Senior Practicum

    3 credits
    A field placement provides an opportunity for the student to apply classroom knowledge to work within a specific clinical setting. A research paper, based on the experience, enables students to integrate theory with observation and practice. This practicum includes on-site individual supervision by an art therapist, as well as a small group supervision on campus with the Art Therapy faculty.

    Prerequisites AETH*303 and LASS*974

  
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    AETH 490 - Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    AETH 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
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    GRAT 699 - Topics: Art Therapy

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.


Communication

  
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    CMMC 3XX - Digital Distribution

    3 cr, 3 hrs.
    Take one Digital distribution course.

  
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    CMMC 101 - Communication,Culture,Process

    6 credits
    “An exploration of communication as a social and cultural process, integrating theory and analysis with practical production projects. Communication studies, linguistics, anthropology, and sociology are applied across cultural settings. Student work includes reading, writing reaction papers, and projects combining observations and analysis of communication processes with digital video production. Basic instruction in the use of digital video camera and audio equipment and logging, importing, editing, and presenting digital material. Projects employ video to document observations of nonverbal communication, interviews and speech events, and performances. Studio time is linked to course projects.”

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 102 - Video Production Workshop

    3 credits
    Acquaints students with the fundamentals of visual storytelling by providing hands-on experience translating the written word into images and sounds. Areas of study include framing images, lighting, using off-screen space and sound, editing, and postproduction. Students integrate their own writing to produce some of these projects.

    Priority enrollment to Communication, Writing for Film and Television, Applied Theater majors; Web Drama minors.

  
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    CMMC 124 - Introduction to Advertising

    3 credits
    This course introduces students to a history of advertising in order to provide a context for current trends and themes; they will learn about the unique characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of the different tactics and vehicles that make up the current marketing mix. They will learn the different jobs within advertising agencies, what they do, what their responsibilities are, and how they work with others.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 151 - History of Communication

    3 credits
    Examines how major developments in communication have influenced social and cultural history and how major historical and social changes have had an impact on communication and society. Draws connections between historically specific and contemporary modes of communication in a variety of times and cultures and the present.

  
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    CMMC 201 - Media Forms and Concepts I

    3 credits
    First of a two-semester exploration of media forms through the perspective of genre, structure, and representation, combining analysis and media production. Students are exposed to mainstream and alternative media and focus on issues of form (i.e., time, space, point of view, etc.) and social context (i.e., cross-cultural representation, stereotyping, the portrayal of gender and sexuality, the representation of violence, etc.) in order to observe how media forms create cultural meanings. Students develop an analytical framework and practical language for talking about media and an understanding of how production practices and audience expectations combine to affect the structure of media forms. Students approach these topics in media representation through creative work in documentary, journalism, and advertising using digital video, audio, still images, and the Web.

    Prerequisites CMMC*102

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 202 - Media Forms & Concepts II

    3 credits
    Second of a two-semester exploration of media forms through the perspective of genre, structure, and representation, combining analysis and media production. Students are exposed to mainstream and alternative media and focus on issues of form (i.e., time, space, point of view, etc.) and social context (i.e., cross-cultural representation, stereotyping, the portrayal of gender and sexuality, the representation of violence, etc.) in order to observe how media forms create cultural meanings. Students develop an analytical framework and practical language for talking about media and an understanding of how production practices and audience expectations combine to affect the structure of media forms. Students approach these topics in media representation through creative work in documentary, journalism, and advertising using digital video, audio, still images, and the Web.

    Prerequisites CMMC*201

  
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    CMMC 205 - Webcasting

    3 credits
    Webcasting is a production workshop that introduces students to the world of streaming media (audio and video transmitted over the Internet). The course balances the technical elements of Webcasting with the creative aspects of content production, distribution, and community. Students work in teams and individually to produce pre-recorded and original material for archives and live Webcasts.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 206 - Webcasting II

    3 credits
    WEBCASTING II is a production workshop that offers an advanced level of media production methods for different online distribution methods. Students will learn to develop all aspects of interactive streaming, from media production, to server configuration, to front-end programming and social networking. The course will focus more on the technology rather than the content. We will be experimenting with various new technologies such as FLASH Movies, JAVA based players, and Video LAN. We will also be incorporating alternative input devices for the streaming part of the class such as wireless video cameras, simple FLASH-based animation, and other methods that expand the type of streaming experience that can be created.

    Prerequisites CMMC*205

  
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    CMMC 207 - Digital Distribution

    3 credits
    Digital Distribution is a critical course focusing on the impact that digital media and distribution have had on our society and culture over the last ten years in particular. Digital technology has revolutionized the way we produce and consume media. The shift has been epitomized in the rise of self-published content created by individuals rather than traditional broadcasters and distributed to a mass audience. We are entering an era of common, niche-driven mass media, produced by anyone with a computer and an Internet connection. Students in this course will focus on the impact that digital distribution has had on traditional media and the way our culture is changing with this new perspective. We will also look at the way in which companies are adapting to this change in the media landscape. Which companies are approaching the challenges with fresh ideas, and which ones are struggling to adapt? We will look at case studies to help navigate the evolution of companies’ relationship with this disruptive technology.

  
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    CMMC 221 - Advertising: Creative Concepts I

    3 credits
    Whether an advertisement appears in print, on television or radio, or on the Internet, it is built around an idea. Students learn to recognize and create strong advertising ideas that are relevant to the product and the audience, with an emphasis on print advertising. Students learn how to allow their creativity to be guided by strategy. Students are exposed to outstanding creative work and readings in their texts and from studying professional work. They then apply these principles as they create advertising of their own.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors and Strategic Advertising minors.

  
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    CMMC 301 - Communication Production Workshop

    3 credits
    This production course offers students an opportunity to work on a project in a specific communication medium or genre otherwise unavailable. Students work collaboratively on projects in this medium and present their work to an audience of peers and/or professionals. Topics include: Web radio/streaming audio sites, producing television commercials, producing advanced audio projects, or developing online publications.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

    Restrictions Instructor Permission Required
  
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    CMMC 311 - Narrative Video Production Workshop

    3 credits
    An opportunity to develop an understanding of and experience in producing narrative-based video projects. Students begin by reading essays and articles, screening scenes from films and television shows, and reviewing technical language and concepts. They learn to translate script ideas into production proposals, making clear how story ideas, characters, action, and point of view will be rendered in sound and image. Working both on their own projects and as team members, they plan production specifics and shoot/record and edit short narrative pieces in their medium and style of choice. Students present stages of production work, from planning to script to rushes to stages of edited material.

    Prerequisites CMMC*101 or CMMC*102

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors, Narrative Video minors.

  
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    CMMC 312 - Advance Narrative Video Production

    3 credits
    Students complete a twenty-minute narrative film, emphasizing their role as director and storyteller. A script must be submitted and approved before entering the course.

    Prerequisites CMMC*311, WRIT*220, or THEA*152 A script must be submitted and approved prior to enrollment.

  
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    CMMC 321 - Advertising Strategy Development

    3 credits
    The business side of creative advertising, this course examines the functions of the various departments within an advertising agency, focusing on strategic development, and introduces the three key steps in that development-market segmentation, brand positioning, and research. Students learn a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods and analytical methods and apply what they have learned by developing and presenting an advertising strategy for an actual product.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors and Strategic Advertising minors.

  
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    CMMC 322 - Advertising: Creative Concepts II

    3 credits
    Having learned how to create strong individual concepts, students create broader and deeper concepts that can form the basis for a number of ads and learn how to execute an idea in more than one medium. The course begins by examining award-winning print campaigns in order to recognize suitable ideas for multi-ad campaigns; to identify elements and themes and their grounding in research; and to understand the consumer. The course then examines how interactive media are being used to build customer relationships and brand identities, and explores the strategic functions of these new media. Students develop storyboards for a product or service that reinforces that product’s existing brand personality.

    Prerequisites CMMC*221

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors and Strategic Advertising minors.

  
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    CMMC 324 - Introduction to Public Relations

    3 credits
    This course explores the fundamentals of public relations, viewed as a marketing communications tool, with special attention to its role in the non-profit sphere. The course reviews the functions of a wide range of marketing communications tools and explores how PR can be used in conjunction with them to achieve an organization’s objectives, helping students to come to understand the role of public relations in the overall marketing communications plan. Students learn how to coordinate messages in order to allow the company to speak with one voice and reinforce one overall corporate identity, with special attention to social marketing and the public. A series of projects culminates in students developing a public relations proposal for a non-profit organization.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors and Strategic Advertising minors.

  
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    CMMC 331 - Digital Journalism I

    3 credits
    The primary skills and practices involved in constructing news for the online environment, this course begins with an exploration of the evolution of journalism from print to online and digital forms. By looking critically at a range of journalistic examples and reading about the changing work of reporting, students grapple with the differences between traditional and new media forms of journalism and begin to learn the practice of reporting online. They work through a set of exercises researching story ideas, pitching them to the class, conducting interviews, and writing, designing, and posting short pieces for the Web, introducing them to the possibilities and constraints of working in this medium.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors and E-Publishing minors.

  
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    CMMC 332 - Digital Journalism II

    3 credits
    A more intensive course in digital journalism, building on CMMC 331: Digital Journalism I, in which students explore the present state and future possibilities for journalism in the online environment. Students work in teams and on their own to complete a more complex set of online journalism projects, researching story ideas, pitching them to the class, conducting interviews, and writing and designing story sites for the Web.

    Prerequisites CMMC*331

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 334 - News and Culture in the Digital Age

    3 credits
    Surveys the impact of social issues on journalism and the social impact of journalism on society in the digital age. Through readings about journalism and society and case studies, both past and current, of how the news industry operates, students learn about how race, gender, ethics, technology and the changing nature of the news business affect the work of journalists. These issues take on increased importance with the shift to digital technologies for production and distribution.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 341 - Documentary Video Production

    3 credits
    The conceptual, aesthetic, and pragmatic dimensions of producing video documentaries. Students are exposed to examples of a variety of documentary approaches through screenings and readings, which illustrate the range of choices and creative possibilities of communicating information and emotion through this form. They are also introduced to advanced digital video technologies as they work through a series of structured exercises and later work in teams to develop documentary projects. Project work includes pre-production research, interviews, original shooting in small crews, editing, and presenting finished work.

    Prerequisites CMMC*102

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors, Documentary Video minors.

  
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    CMMC 342 - Advanced Documentary Video Production

    3 credits
    Develops a deeper understanding of the pragmatic, conceptual, and aesthetic dimensions of producing documentary video and audio. The course presents contemporary issues and approaches in documentary media-making through screenings and readings. Students achieve increased mastery of advanced digital video technologies and work through a series of project stages for a medium-length documentary. Students are responsible for completing their own projects, presenting them to their colleagues, and collaborating on other students’ projects.

    Prerequisites CMMC*341

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors, Documentary Video minors.

  
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    CMMC 350 - Gender Images in Media

    3 credits
    Explores representation of gender and sexuality in the media over the past century and how images of male and female both follow and create social change. This class carries Liberal Arts Elective credit.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

  
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    CMMC 351 - History of Documentary

    3 credits
    Introduces the historical and aesthetic sweep of approaches to documentary film and video. Through extensive screenings and readings, this survey opens the range of choices and creative possibilities for documentary while understanding aesthetic conventions, technological limitations, and social history. In addition to attending screenings and discussion, students write two short papers and one longer term paper.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors, Documentary Video minors.

  
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    CMMC 352 - Communication Theories and Culture

    3 credits
    An intellectual history of influential 20th-century theories of communication, with a focus on the relationships between media and culture. This course reviews critical intellectual developments in the field against the backdrop of public events, social movements, and the changing daily lives of people in diverse places. The course examines how communication systems shape the course of public and private lives and how changes in communication reshaped the way we theorize about the world and the field are examined. Students read primary material in its original form, view media examples, write short position papers reflecting communication theory and culture, and complete a term paper.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 353 - Media Industries

    3 credits
    This course investigates the range of organizations and economic forces involved in media production. Includes diverse production models, from mainstream and corporate, to public sector, to alternative, and comparisons with media industries in other cultural settings. The course focuses on business and policy issues and considers examples of media practice from broadcast and cable news, advertising, Hollywood and independent cinema, public media, and new media industries. The course includes a final research project.

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors. Priority enrollment to Multimedia majors. Priority enrollment to Writing for Film/TV majors.

  
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    CMMC 401 - Communication - Senior Studio I

    3 credits
    In this project based, two-semester sequence (CMMC 401 & CMMC 402), students work on the development of their own presentation-quality hybrid project, combining aspects of their two chosen application areas (documentary video, digital journalism, narrative video, screenwriting, advertising, game design and Web design). Students research and develop project proposals in the fall semester, and begin production work. They continue this work in the spring semester, resulting in a polished piece of video, audio, print or digital form. Students write reflective pieces about their production experience in light of theoretical and contemporary issues, and complete the yearlong course with a portfolio/reel of their creative work.

  
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    CMMC 402 - Communication - Senior Studio II

    3 credits
    In this project based, two-semester sequence (CMMC 401 & CMMC 402), students work on the development of their own presentation-quality hybrid project, combining aspects of their two chosen application areas (documentary video, digital journalism, narrative video, screenwriting, advertising, game design, and Web design). Students research and develop project proposals in the fall semester, and begin production work. They continue this work in the spring semester, resulting in a polished piece of video, audio, print, or digital form. Students write reflective pieces about their production experience in light of theoretical and contemporary issues, and complete the yearlong course with a portfolio/reel of their creative work.

    Prerequisites CMMC*401

  
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    CMMC 415 - E-Publishing Thesis Project

    3 credits
    This studio class allows students to complete a project and publish it online. Students examine the sub-field of e-publishing that their project fits within, research relevant models and examples, write a business plan for their project, consider intellectual property questions raised by their project, complete and present their thesis project, and write a reflective paper about their project.

    Prerequisites Take 9 credits from: CMMC*331, LASS**831, MM*221, or MMDI*13

    Open to students in the E-Publishing minor only.

  
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    CMMC 460 - Current Issues in Communication

    3 credits
    Explores the changing landscape of ethical and policy issues in communication from a critical and intellectual perspective, with a focus on emerging issues driven by the shift to digital media (image ethics and manipulation, intellectual property, changing nature of distribution, etc.). Building on previous coursework and studio experiences, students read material from current literature and write reflective and research-based papers on selected issues. Guest speakers in the various industries and independent sectors provide a real-world perspective on how these issues affect professional practice.

    Prerequisites LACR*102 or LACR*103

    Priority enrollment to Communication majors.

  
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    CMMC 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CMMC 499 - Communication Internship

    3 credits
    Professional internship with a media organization or producer. Student needs to gain approval for internships from an advisor, meet periodically for supervisory discussions, and complete a short, reflective essay at the end of the internship.

    Open to Communication majors only.

  
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    CMMC 690 - Graduate Independent Study

    1 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.


Crafts

  
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    CAIN 498 - Fine Arts/Crafts Internship

    3 credits
    Opportunities to apprentice to practicing artists, gain gallery experience, and work with non-profit organizations, which leads to practical experience and knowledge about the field.

    Open to Fine Arts and Crafts majors only. Student must have completed the 1st semester, of their Sophomore year (45 credits).

  
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    CRFT 111 - Freshman Ceramics

    1.5 credits
    Through lecture and demonstrations, students learn basic skills such as handbuilding, throwing, and press molding with an introduction to loading and firing kilns and mixing clay and glazes. Problems are given with an emphasis on developing each student’s potential for personal expression and artistic invention. Freshmen are encouraged to participate in the departmental guest lecture series and field trips.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits). Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CRFT 121 - Freshman Fibers and Mixed Media

    1.5 credits
    Provides Foundation students with a hands-on studio experience grounded in fabric processes and materials as a means of personal expression. The student receives an introduction to stamp printing and direct painting on fabric, collage, three-dimensional off-loom structures, as well as tapestry weaving on frame loom. Guidance is offered in the form of demonstrations, slide presentations, field trips, informal discussion, and intensive group critiques.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits). Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CRFT 131 - Freshman Glass

    1.5 credits
    Explores glass as an expressive and creative medium. Students work with flat glass in stained glass techniques.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits). Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CRFT 141 - Freshman Jewelry and Metalsmithing

    1.5 credits
    An introduction to metalwork through several beginning jewelry projects. Students learn basic fabrication techniques through simple hollow construction; movement is approached through aspects of linkage and chain making; forming and fabrication is covered as well.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits). Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CRFT 161 - Freshman Furniture and Wood

    1.5 credits
    The introduction of wood as a material, basic joinery theory, and the ability to manipulate safely with both hand and power tools. Lecture on and demonstration of the properties of wood and the proper use of the band saw and shaping tools, including rasps, chisels, small hand planes, and gouges.

    Priority enrollment to Foundation majors. Student must NOT have completed the 2nd semester of their, Sophomore year (45 credits). Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
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    CRFT 201 - Projects I

    3 credits
    Students make art that deals with crafts issues and concepts. Individual project consultations are supplemented by lectures, visiting artists, and group critiques. As this course is content based, students use any/all crafts studios during in-class work time and open studio hours. (Students have access to crafts studios where they have completed or are currently taking a media-specific course.)

    Prerequisites FNDP*131

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
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    CRFT 202 - Projects I

    3 credits
    Students make art that deals with crafts issues and concepts. Individual project consultations are supplemented by lectures, visiting artists, and group critiques. As this course is content based, students use any/all crafts studios during in-class work time and open studio hours. (Students have access to crafts studios where they have completed or are currently taking a media-specific course.)

    Prerequisites CRFT*201

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
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    CRFT 224 - Art for the Body

    3 credits
    This introductory mixed-media course focuses on the body as the site-specific locus for a variety of art forms. Looking at a range of cultural and historical examples, students gain an appreciation for the personal and social influences that underlie our conception of the human body and how we construct for it. Studio work in an array of media, with specific emphasis on the use of metal, paper, fabric, and leather. Technical information includes flat pattern making, piecing and sewing; forming and fabrication; mixed-media construction; and systems of attachment, linkage, and closure. Emphasis on the student’s ability to generate unique solutions to the physical challenges imposed by the human body on the content of attire.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
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    CRFT 281 - 3D Computer Modeling

    1.5 credits
    An introduction to the use of 3-D modeling software for visualization, design, production, and presentation of Craft objects. Through tutorial exercises and individual projects, students become fluent in the use of this important tool. One piece of software (such as formZ, Rhino, etc.) that is both CAD accurate and affordable to individual artists is covered. As students gain proficiency, they apply the techniques to problems addressed in their major studio classes. Students taking the course for a second time explore the capabilities of the software in more depth and focus on intelligent sequencing of operations and using the tools in context.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

    Restrictions Computer Literacy Required
  
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    CRFT 299 - Selected Topics in Crafts

    1.5 - 3 credits
    This course allows for the presentation of one-time, unique studio experiences involving either specialized themes, media, classroom structures, or teaching and learning formats, for the development of projects relevant to contemporary Crafts issues.

    Priority enrollment to Crafts majors.

  
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    CRFT 301 - Projects II

    3 credits
    Art-making dealing with crafts issues and concepts. A continuation of Projects I, work done in this class becomes increasingly student determined as the dialogue becomes more subjective. As this course is content-based, students use any/all crafts studios during in-class work time and open studio hours. (Students have access to crafts studios where they have completed or are currently taking a media-specific course.)

    Prerequisites CRFT*202

    Open to Crafts majors only.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
  •  

    CRFT 302 - Projects II

    3 credits
    Art-making dealing with crafts issues and concepts. A continuation of Projects I, work done in this class becomes increasingly student determined as the dialogue becomes more subjective. As this course is content-based, students use any/all crafts studios during in-class work time and open studio hours. (Students have access to crafts studios where they have completed or are currently taking a media-specific course.)

    Prerequisites CRFT*301

    Open to Crafts majors only.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
  •  

    CRFT 401 - Projects III

    3 credits
    Student selects a topic and produces a body of work for the crafts Senior thesis exhibition. Part of this course is Senior Seminar, a forum for the discussion of ideas and issues through student participation, guest lecturers, and professional offerings. The modern craft aesthetic is examined in terms of late nineteenth- and twentieth-century ideas and issues. Emphasis on the interdependency of all the arts with an eye to the unique contribution of crafts ideology and practice. Topical discussions encourage students to find contemporary relevancy and validity in an analysis of historical precedents. Other topics include: making an artist’s presentation, resume preparation, writing an artist’s statement, recordkeeping and taxes, grant writing, and career opportunities. Particular attention is paid to the style and survival techniques of contemporaries working in craft media.

    Prerequisites CRFT*302

    Open to Crafts majors only.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
  •  

    CRFT 402 - Projects III

    3 credits
    Student selects a topic and produces a body of work for the crafts Senior thesis exhibition. Part of this course is Senior Seminar, a forum for the discussion of ideas and issues through student participation, guest lecturers, and professional offerings. The modern craft aesthetic is examined in terms of late nineteenth- and twentieth-century ideas and issues. Emphasis on the interdependency of all the arts with an eye to the unique contribution of crafts ideology and practice. Topical discussions encourage students to find contemporary relevancy and validity in an analysis of historical precedents. Other topics include: making an artist’s presentation, resume preparation, writing an artist’s statement, recordkeeping and taxes, grant writing, and career opportunities. Particular attention is paid to the style and survival techniques of contemporaries working in craft media.

    Prerequisites CRFT*401

    Open to Crafts majors only.

    Restrictions Enrollment in Studio Required
  
  •  

    CRFT 490 - Independent Study

    1.5 - 6 credits
    Independent Study offers a matriculated student the opportunity to initiate individual research or advanced projects that are beyond the limits of the standard curriculum, with limited supervision. Independent Study is available to Junior and Senior undergraduate students who have a minimum 2.5 GPA and to graduate students in good standing. Independent Study cannot fulfill major requirements. Independent Study may serve as free, studio, and liberal arts electives, depending on the topic of investigation. Students cannot apply more than 12 total credits of independent study toward their degree requirements.

    Restricted to Undergraduate students only.

  
  •  

    GRCM 311 - Advanced Throwing

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration on the wheel. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, serial production, the table, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness with clay on the wheel. Senior Craft majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

  
  •  

    GRCM 312 - Advanced Throwing

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration on the wheel. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, serial production, the table, and site-oriented applications, and medium to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness with clay on the wheel. Senior Craft majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

  
  •  

    GRCM 313 - Advanced Ceramics

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, production, and site-oriented applications, and medium to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRCM 314 - Advanced Ceramics

    3 credits
    Concentration on resolving conceptual and formal issues as they relate to individual exploration. Problems encourage uniqueness and challenge abilities. Typical issues include usage and symbolic function, production, and site-oriented applications, and medium- to large-scale use of materials. All problems stress practical as well as aesthetic resourcefulness. Senior Crafts majors taking this course may choose to spend all or part of their time producing thesis work to supplement the thesis component of Crafts Projects III.

    Restricted to students enrolled in graduate programs.

  
  •  

    GRCM 699 - Topics: Communication

    1 - 6 credits
    Graduate students may register for upper-level undergraduate liberal arts courses and studio electives for graduate credit. Graduate students are expected to contribute at a higher level in the classroom and have additional assignments (readings, papers, etc.) in order to be granted graduate credit. Students are advised to select an area of study that broadens or intensifies their background in the arts, education, and related disciplines. Often this work contributes directly to the preparation of the graduate project proposal. In order to register for an upper-level undergraduate course and receive credit, the student must submit a completed special topics/independent study form to the Office of the Registrar.

 

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